Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

On a business occasion, I recently met a Chinese man who gave me some
tea in a small sealed package. He said that it would have a very good
smell. When I brewed it, I used green tea temperature and time
guidelines (175 degrees F 1-2 minutes), and I was astounded at how
fragrant and wonderful this tea tasted. The small package which may
have been a tablespoon lasted for days, and I must have gotten 7+
infusions out of the last bit. I enjoyed the tea so much that I hated
to throw the leaves out even chewing them for fresh breath before
finally discarding.
I later emailed him and asked about the tea, to which he replied that
it was Tie Guanyin (an oolong, which I mistakenly called a green) and
gave me this link
http://tieguanyinchaye.com/tieguanyintea/ I have searched for a tea
this good for about 1 month and found a post on this group about
teaspring. I am happy to say that I found an oolong very close to the
Tie Guanyin. It is Huang Jin Gui, which is not very expensive. Any
suggestions on others from this source? So far, all the teas that i
have tried from Teaspring are excellent (to my uninitiated taste-but I
know what I like). I've tried a gunpowder green, Keemun Mao Feng, and
Yunnan Pure Gold. In the process of finding a tea like the Tie
Guanyin, I discovered that Oolongs vary a lot. Some that I received
from other sources were more fermented, bitter, and had a "funky"
taste. I now know that I like lightly fermented, floral type Oolongs,
although in a black tea I favor Assam for the malty taste.
Now that I have all these different types of teas, I am trying to
decide which tea to season a Yixing pot with. It's either the Yunnan
or the Huang Jin Gui. It seems like the stronger/bolder taste of the
tea, the more the Yixing would pick up the taste, although this is
just guessing. Then there is the possibility that I'll get more
infusions out of the Huang Jin Gui. Which would be the better use of
the pot?
Gregory
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 997
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

swede > writes:

> On a business occasion, I recently met a Chinese man who gave me some
> tea in a small sealed package. He said that it would have a very good
> smell. When I brewed it, I used green tea temperature and time
> guidelines (175 degrees F 1-2 minutes), and I was astounded at how
> fragrant and wonderful this tea tasted. The small package which may
> have been a tablespoon lasted for days, and I must have gotten 7+
> infusions out of the last bit. I enjoyed the tea so much that I hated
> to throw the leaves out even chewing them for fresh breath before
> finally discarding.
> I later emailed him and asked about the tea, to which he replied that
> it was Tie Guanyin (an oolong, which I mistakenly called a green) and
> gave me this link
> http://tieguanyinchaye.com/tieguanyintea/ I have searched for a tea
> this good for about 1 month and found a post on this group about
> teaspring. I am happy to say that I found an oolong very close to the
> Tie Guanyin. It is Huang Jin Gui, which is not very expensive. Any
> suggestions on others from this source? So far, all the teas that i
> have tried from Teaspring are excellent (to my uninitiated taste-but I
> know what I like). I've tried a gunpowder green, Keemun Mao Feng, and
> Yunnan Pure Gold. In the process of finding a tea like the Tie
> Guanyin, I discovered that Oolongs vary a lot. Some that I received
> from other sources were more fermented, bitter, and had a "funky"
> taste. I now know that I like lightly fermented, floral type Oolongs,
> although in a black tea I favor Assam for the malty taste.
> Now that I have all these different types of teas, I am trying to
> decide which tea to season a Yixing pot with. It's either the Yunnan
> or the Huang Jin Gui. It seems like the stronger/bolder taste of the
> tea, the more the Yixing would pick up the taste, although this is
> just guessing. Then there is the possibility that I'll get more
> infusions out of the Huang Jin Gui. Which would be the better use of
> the pot?


First of all, congratulations on discovering tea!

I'm far from an expert on Yixing pots, but I do know that not every
Yixing collector believes that one pot needs to be restricted to a
narrow genre of tea.

But really, at this stage, even if you believe that, say, Huang Jin
Gui might be something to dedicate a pot to, maybe you shouldn't be
worrying about pots at all. You still need to map out your personal
taste in tea, don't you? If you get yourself a serviceable, plain
porcelain gaiwan, you will have lots to occupy your mouth, nose, and
mind for a long time.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong


"Lewis Perin" > wrote in message news
> swede > writes:
>
>> On a business occasion, I recently met a Chinese man who gave me some
>> tea in a small sealed package. He said that it would have a very good
>> smell. When I brewed it, I used green tea temperature and time
>> guidelines (175 degrees F 1-2 minutes), and I was astounded at how
>> fragrant and wonderful this tea tasted. The small package which may
>> have been a tablespoon lasted for days, and I must have gotten 7+
>> infusions out of the last bit. I enjoyed the tea so much that I hated
>> to throw the leaves out even chewing them for fresh breath before
>> finally discarding.
>> I later emailed him and asked about the tea, to which he replied that
>> it was Tie Guanyin (an oolong, which I mistakenly called a green) and
>> gave me this link
>> http://tieguanyinchaye.com/tieguanyintea/ I have searched for a tea
>> this good for about 1 month


It seems that you would like to have the tea 'you enjoyed so much'
but you are not able to have that and settle for a 'substitute',
if you will.

Isn't there a way to order that tea for you and for us, if any?
I mean, there is a link to direct to the tea but that is in Chinese,
so that it is nigh impossible for us, if any, to use practically.
Will it be too much for you to ask the Chinese man in question
to give you more information so you can order the tea
in English?

Any help there?

and found a post on this group about
>> teaspring. I am happy to say that I found an oolong very close to the
>> Tie Guanyin. It is Huang Jin Gui, which is not very expensive. Any
>> suggestions on others from this source? So far, all the teas that i
>> have tried from Teaspring are excellent (to my uninitiated taste-but I
>> know what I like). I've tried a gunpowder green, Keemun Mao Feng, and
>> Yunnan Pure Gold. In the process of finding a tea like the Tie
>> Guanyin, I discovered that Oolongs vary a lot. Some that I received
>> from other sources were more fermented, bitter, and had a "funky"
>> taste. I now know that I like lightly fermented, floral type Oolongs,
>> although in a black tea I favor Assam for the malty taste.
>> Now that I have all these different types of teas, I am trying to
>> decide which tea to season a Yixing pot with. It's either the Yunnan
>> or the Huang Jin Gui. It seems like the stronger/bolder taste of the
>> tea, the more the Yixing would pick up the taste, although this is
>> just guessing. Then there is the possibility that I'll get more
>> infusions out of the Huang Jin Gui. Which would be the better use of
>> the pot?

>
> First of all, congratulations on discovering tea!
>
> I'm far from an expert on Yixing pots, but I do know that not every
> Yixing collector believes that one pot needs to be restricted to a
> narrow genre of tea.
>
> But really, at this stage, even if you believe that, say, Huang Jin
> Gui might be something to dedicate a pot to, maybe you shouldn't be
> worrying about pots at all. You still need to map out your personal
> taste in tea, don't you? If you get yourself a serviceable, plain
> porcelain gaiwan, you will have lots to occupy your mouth, nose, and
> mind for a long time.
>
> /Lew
> ---
> Lew Perin /
>
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

snip
> Isn't there a way to order that tea for you and for us, if any?
> I mean, there is a link to direct to the tea but that is in Chinese,
> so that it is nigh impossible for us, if any, to use practically.
> Will it be too much for you to ask the Chinese man in question
> to give you more information so you can order the tea
> in English?
>
> Any help there?


Yes, I looked at that website through Google translation, but didn't
know exactly which tea, etc. I have emailed my Chinese friend asking
for more information, but haven't received a reply, yet. The Huang Jin
Gui from Teaspring is very close, although I didn't get as many
infusions. I believe that I may find a tea that is really as good from
Teaspring the next time I order, since now I know the name of the tea.
I will post back, if I get more info.

Gregory

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong


"swede" > wrote

> Yes, I looked at that website through Google translation, but didn't
> know exactly which tea, etc. I have emailed my Chinese friend asking
> for more information, but haven't received a reply, yet. The Huang Jin
> Gui from Teaspring is very close, although I didn't get as many
> infusions. I believe that I may find a tea that is really as good from
> Teaspring the next time I order, since now I know the name of the tea.
> I will post back, if I get more info.


Thanks.



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

Teas with the name "Tie Guanyin" (translated as Iron Buddha, Iron
Goddess of Mercy, Iron Avalokiteƛvara) are very common and are
available from any reasonably serious dealer. The main problem one
might have is the existence of 2 completely different kinds of tea
under the same name. The Tie Guanyin I know from Mucha on the
outskirts of Taipei in Taiwan is a strongly oxidized, 'roasted,'
'dark' tea with caramel characteristics. The Tie Guanyin that had
Gregory bowled over is the other kind, essentially a very lightly
oxidized, virtually green, oolong mostly originating from the
mainland. Like all such generic teas, (Dragon Well is another example)
a wide range of qualities exists, so that again explains why a
reliable dealer is important, and a careful read of the product
description. Of course, it is perfectly possible to find similar
intensities of fragrance in other lightly oxidized oolongs and there
is no end to the variety available. The dark variety of Tie Guanyin
matures over time, rather like pu'erh, and is now sometimes marketed
as being 10 or more years old. Additional sessions over a gentle heat
from time to time are involved here, I think.

Br Anthony
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

Sevencups may have the tea you want:

http://www.sevencups.com/

Look at Anxi oolongs.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 642
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

swede > wrote:
> I later emailed him and asked about the tea, to which he replied that
>it was Tie Guanyin (an oolong, which I mistakenly called a green) and
>gave me this link
>http://tieguanyinchaye.com/tieguanyintea/ I have searched for a tea
>this good for about 1 month and found a post on this group about
>teaspring.


Tikuanyin (Goddess Tea, Tie Guanyin, whatever you want to call it) is
probably the most popular oolong sold. It's not as popular as it was
a decade or so ago when there was a huge tikuanyin craze, but it's still
a very popular tea.

Most wholesalers will have at least one or two grades of the stuff.

>I am happy to say that I found an oolong very close to the
>Tie Guanyin. It is Huang Jin Gui, which is not very expensive. Any
>suggestions on others from this source? So far, all the teas that i
>have tried from Teaspring are excellent (to my uninitiated taste-but I
>know what I like).


I would be very surprised if Teaspring didn't have at least one tikuanyin.
I know Upton's has half a dozen, Ten Ren has six grades (and I suggest
the second to lowest if you can find it; their higher grade teas are only
marginally better than their cheap ones and are much more money). It is
common enough that you should even be able to find it at any reasonably
sized Chinese market.

>Now that I have all these different types of teas, I am trying to
>decide which tea to season a Yixing pot with. It's either the Yunnan
>or the Huang Jin Gui. It seems like the stronger/bolder taste of the
>tea, the more the Yixing would pick up the taste, although this is
>just guessing. Then there is the possibility that I'll get more
>infusions out of the Huang Jin Gui. Which would be the better use of
>the pot?


If you season it with a mild tea, you can later on use a darker tea that
will cover the taste of the mild tea if you decide you would rather use
the pot with the darker tea. If you season it with a darker tea, you will
never be able to use it with anything else. It only goes one way, so if
you don't know what you want, start with something mild like a dishwater
oolong.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Discovering Tie Guanyin and Teaspring Oolong

On Dec 27, 1:19*pm, (Scott Dorsey) wrote:
snip
> I would be very surprised if Teaspring didn't have at least one tikuanyin..
> I know Upton's has half a dozen, Ten Ren has six grades (and I suggest
> the second to lowest if you can find it; their higher grade teas are only
> marginally better than their cheap ones and are much more money). *It is
> common enough that you should even be able to find it at any reasonably
> sized Chinese market.


I am even now planning another Teaspring order as well as searching
some of the other sources suggested.

> If you season it with a mild tea, you can later on use a darker tea that
> will cover the taste of the mild tea if you decide you would rather use
> the pot with the darker tea. *If you season it with a darker tea, you will
> never be able to use it with anything else. *It only goes one way, so if
> you don't know what you want, start with something mild like a dishwater
> oolong.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. *C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


This is a great idea, and I will approach it this way. I did use it
for some Yunnan yesterday, but the mild oolong will be next. I really
like the pot. I really appreciate all the helpful posts. I learn from
each one. I just wish I had more time to make and drink tea!
Gregory
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tie Guanyin's anti-aging effects sunnygirl General Cooking 5 02-11-2009 06:07 PM
Discovering to save the pasta water Karen[_3_] General Cooking 109 19-06-2008 09:12 PM
Discovering no-chew foods Kajikit[_2_] General Cooking 44 12-05-2008 01:14 AM
Pu Ti Cha from TeaSpring Shen[_2_] Tea 0 12-02-2008 12:40 AM
Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong! Shen[_2_] Tea 12 20-01-2008 11:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:59 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2023 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"