Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Dan Stromberg
 
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Default "Chinese tea by class"

http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm

Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.

Where can I find a good "yellow tea"? Preferrably in the $7.50-$10.00
for a 1/4 pound range. I'd like to try one.
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Lawman
 
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On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 21:00:59 GMT, Dan Stromberg > wrote:
> http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
>
> Where can I find a good "yellow tea"? Preferrably in the $7.50-$10.00
> for a 1/4 pound range. I'd like to try one.


I have found only one YELLOW tea: Hua Shan Huang Ya Yellow Tea is available at
Todd & Holland (http://www.todd-holland.com/fineteas...teaType=whites).
The offer it near the bottom of their White Tea page. Unfortunately, the
price is quite a bit higher that what you want -- $10.80 per 0.05 pound. It
is a very interesting tea with extremely small leaves. The taste is close to
that of the finer Chinese greens.

Todd & holland carries a large range of teas, and it can be really enjoyable
to visit their shop.

H.L.Law


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cc
 
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"Dan Stromberg" > wrote in message

> http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
>
> Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
> I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.


That's not contradictory. As the site says, the process is different.

Black tea :
-leaves are heated
-leaves are massaged by hand*
-time of maturation in high temperature
-leaves are massaged by hand*
-leaves are dried

Red tea :
-leaves are displayed on baskets
-leaves are massaged by hand*
-fermentation
-leaves are dried

*I translate without knowing the technical term in English, but that's
litterally what they do.

Kuri

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Zephyrus
 
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Default "Chinese tea by class"

Lawman > wrote in message >...
> On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 21:00:59 GMT, Dan Stromberg > wrote:
> > http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
> >
> > Where can I find a good "yellow tea"? Preferrably in the $7.50-$10.00
> > for a 1/4 pound range. I'd like to try one.



I doubt that you are going to find any yellow tea for under $15 per
quarter pound, and you'd be lucky to find that, with the US tea market
as it is.

What I'd advise is to try a sample of something, which is usually not
too expensive (all of the following sources offer a sample size). And
no, I have no affiliation with any of the following, save that I've
ordered tea from all of them with no problems yet.

Holy Mountain offers the most economical yellow tea I've so far seen,
for $18 per 1/4 lb. http://www.holymtn.com/tea/whitetea.htm (about
halfway down the page, "Organic Huoshan Yellow Sprouting".)

Ten Tea (aka Ten Ren) offers one yellow tea as well:
http://www.tentea.com/yellowtea.html

Imperial Tea Court offers three (!) yellows, none of which sells for
under $30 per 1/4 lb. Even the 1oz. samples usually run over $15.

I wish I could discuss the relative merits of these teas, but
unfortunately I'm as ignorant of yellows as you are. Hopefully someone
will try one and tell us.

Good luck,

ZBL
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Zephyrus
 
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Dan Stromberg > wrote in message . uci.edu>...
> http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
>
> Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
> I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.
>


"Red Tea" (Hong Cha) is what we call Black Tea here in the west.

What they call "Black Tea" (Hei Cha) in China, Pu-Erh being the most
common example, is a class that can brew up to a very dark tea and
improves with age. The only other members of this class I can think of
are Liu Bao and Liu An, although there are probably more.

Hope that helps,

ZBL


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myclee
 
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So, you say that both red tea and black tea are not the same in China
because of the way to processes the tea are different. But, I just
wondering are they both taste the same?

myclee

"cc" > wrote in message >...
> "Dan Stromberg" > wrote in message
>
> > http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
> >
> > Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
> > I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.

>
> That's not contradictory. As the site says, the process is different.
>
> Black tea :
> -leaves are heated
> -leaves are massaged by hand*
> -time of maturation in high temperature
> -leaves are massaged by hand*
> -leaves are dried
>
> Red tea :
> -leaves are displayed on baskets
> -leaves are massaged by hand*
> -fermentation
> -leaves are dried
>
> *I translate without knowing the technical term in English, but that's
> litterally what they do.
>
> Kuri

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
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Default "Chinese tea by class"

(myclee) writes:

> So, you say that both red tea and black tea are not the same in China
> because of the way to processes the tea are different. But, I just
> wondering are they both taste the same?


No, they don't. When this source says "black tea", they're referring
to the Chinese term "hei cha", which means Puerh and other so-called
fermented teas, e.g. Liu An. This has nothing to do with "red tea"
("hong cha" in Chinese), e.g. Keemun, Yunnan "black", etc.

It's very confusing, I know. When you see a document that looks as if
it was translated from the Chinese referring to "black tea", try to
figure out from the context whether they're using the term in the
Western or the Chinese sense.

> myclee
>
> "cc" > wrote in message >...
> > "Dan Stromberg" > wrote in message
> >
> > >
http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
> > >
> > > Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
> > > I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.

> >
> > That's not contradictory. As the site says, the process is different.
> >
> > Black tea :
> > -leaves are heated
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -time of maturation in high temperature
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -leaves are dried
> >
> > Red tea :
> > -leaves are displayed on baskets
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -fermentation
> > -leaves are dried
> >
> > *I translate without knowing the technical term in English, but that's
> > litterally what they do.
> >
> > Kuri


--

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Zephyrus
 
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Default "Chinese tea by class"

Not at all. "Red" tea is just the same "black" tea all Westerners know
(Keemun, Ceylon, Darjeeling, Lipton...)

Definition: http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcar...hrase=hong+cha
(Incedentally, Babelcarp is a fun site just for browsing tea terms).

"Black" tea is some truly weird stuff, which gets better while it
ages. Look around on rec.food.drink.tea or do a Google Groups search
for "pu-erh" (Pu-Erh is by far the best-known member of the Black tea
class). It's come up a lot recently. I'd recommend a look at Mike
Petro's really great (and inexplicably contreversial) website
www.pu-erh.net . He's really assembled a lot of good links and
resources about pu-erh, which is kind of a mysterious tea.

Definition of "Hei Cha" (black tea):
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcar...phrase=hei+cha

ZBL

(myclee) wrote in message . com>...
> So, you say that both red tea and black tea are not the same in China
> because of the way to processes the tea are different. But, I just
> wondering are they both taste the same?
>
> myclee
>
> "cc" > wrote in message >...
> > "Dan Stromberg" > wrote in message
> >
> > >
http://chineseteas101.com/teaclass.htm
> > >
> > > Is it true that black tea and red tea are two different things in China?
> > > I had thought Red tea in china was what we called black tea in the West.

> >
> > That's not contradictory. As the site says, the process is different.
> >
> > Black tea :
> > -leaves are heated
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -time of maturation in high temperature
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -leaves are dried
> >
> > Red tea :
> > -leaves are displayed on baskets
> > -leaves are massaged by hand*
> > -fermentation
> > -leaves are dried
> >
> > *I translate without knowing the technical term in English, but that's
> > litterally what they do.
> >
> > Kuri

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