Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Default darjeeling muscatel?

i normally drink whites , greens and such kind of tea.

i tried darjeeling blacks for this muscatel flavour and am at a loss.
i ordered teas supposed to be strong muscatel flavour and am missing
it i guess.

the second flush 2008 are for sale now and are 80 bux a pound, WOW

i got some great white tea from yunnansourcing for 35 bux and it is
great. my wife thins the whites taste like normal water but i get a
spectrum of flavours even to the 4th infusion, my wife just rolls her
eyes and pours it in the sink. i get butter vanilla flavours.

based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to spend
that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour,
i thought it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.

any thoughts ?

or is it like my wife and the white tea ? do some ppl just not get the
flavours ?

alanj
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Default darjeeling muscatel?

On Jul 9, 8:38*pm, wrote:
> i normally drink whites , greens and such kind of tea.
>
> i tried darjeeling blacks for this muscatel flavour and am at a loss.
> i ordered teas supposed to be strong muscatel flavour and am missing
> it i guess.
>
> the second flush 2008 are for sale now and are 80 bux a pound, WOW
>
> i got some great white tea from yunnansourcing for 35 bux and it is
> great. my wife thins the whites taste like normal water but i get a
> spectrum of flavours even to the 4th infusion, my wife just rolls her
> eyes and pours it in the sink. i get butter vanilla flavours.
>
> based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to spend
> that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour,
> i thought it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.
>
> any thoughts ?
>
> or is it like my wife and the white tea ? do some ppl just not get the
> flavours ?
>
> alanj


I also mostly drink whites and greens.
Usually I don't drink darjeelings but
sometimes they're not bad. I think
descriptions of taste like 'muscatel'
are not very exact; I never get a
taste from darjeelings very much like
red grapes. If I never heard them
described as 'muscatel-tasting', I
might never chose to describe them
as such myself, but now I do find
a little muscatel-like aftertaste. Same
with whites that are described as
vanilla/butter - yes, but at the same
time very different. In the end, a
particular tea tastes like itself and
nothing else.
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Default darjeeling muscatel?

I've given up on the elusive muscatel taste. I've tried every major
estate darjeeling both flushes for the past five years. All things
being equal the commercial brands are just as good. I call some white
tea taste ephemeral. Some will argue you have to brew it right. I
think the tasting temperature is more important, slightly less than
medium hot or a little more hot than warm. I prefer glass for
tasting. Its not a casual tea. You have to be in the moment with a
clean pallette. Another approach is load the pot and discover the
taste in multiple infusions. If you want to taste a muscatel type
taste in a white tea try SowMee, stuff the pot.

Jim

wrote:
> i normally drink whites , greens and such kind of tea.
>
> i tried darjeeling blacks for this muscatel flavour and am at a loss.
> i ordered teas supposed to be strong muscatel flavour and am missing
> it i guess.
>
> the second flush 2008 are for sale now and are 80 bux a pound, WOW
>
> i got some great white tea from yunnansourcing for 35 bux and it is
> great. my wife thins the whites taste like normal water but i get a
> spectrum of flavours even to the 4th infusion, my wife just rolls her
> eyes and pours it in the sink. i get butter vanilla flavours.
>
> based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to spend
> that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour,
> i thought it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.
>
> any thoughts ?
>
> or is it like my wife and the white tea ? do some ppl just not get the
> flavours ?
>
> alanj

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Default darjeeling muscatel?

writes:

> i normally drink whites , greens and such kind of tea.
>
> i tried darjeeling blacks for this muscatel flavour and am at a loss.
> i ordered teas supposed to be strong muscatel flavour and am missing
> it i guess.
>
> the second flush 2008 are for sale now and are 80 bux a pound, WOW
>
> i got some great white tea from yunnansourcing for 35 bux and it is
> great. my wife thins the whites taste like normal water but i get a
> spectrum of flavours even to the 4th infusion, my wife just rolls her
> eyes and pours it in the sink. i get butter vanilla flavours.


Congratulations on that! Sounds as if you have a lot of pleasure
ahead of you.

> based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to
> spend that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour, i thought
> it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.
>
> any thoughts ?


Darjeelings (second flushes, really) that justifiably wear the
muscatel label are supposed to remind you of *muscatel* grapes, whose
taste hardly resembles that of burgundy red grapes.

> or is it like my wife and the white tea ? do some ppl just not get the
> flavours ?


Well, that certainly happens, too. But if you're really interested in
figuring out the muscatel issue, try to find the right grapes!

/Lew
---
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http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
recent blogger-wedding-anticipation addition: Rui Pin Hao
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Default darjeeling muscatel?

> > based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to
> > spend that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour, i thought
> > it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.

>
> > any thoughts ?

>
> Darjeelings (second flushes, really) that justifiably wear the
> muscatel label are supposed to remind you of *muscatel* grapes, whose
> taste hardly resembles that of burgundy red grapes.


Lew beat me to the punch on this one. I'd never quite "gotten" the
term muscatel used with Darjeeling, mainly because I don't drink any
alcohol, so the only place I'd run into the term is in tea. However,
about a month ago, a tea friend had purchased some Muscat grapes and
gave me some. My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
like second flush Darjeeling!" So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea.

--Michael J. Coffey--
www.Teageek.net
Ironic, isn't it?


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Default darjeeling muscatel?

On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:
> > > based on my three darjeelings already received i find it hard to
> > > spend that kind of cash searching for a muscatel flavour, i thought
> > > it would have been a tartness, like burgundy red grapes.

>
> > > any thoughts ?

>
> > Darjeelings (second flushes, really) that justifiably wear the
> > muscatel label are supposed to remind you of *muscatel* grapes, whose
> > taste hardly resembles that of burgundy red grapes.

>
> Lew beat me to the punch on this one. I'd never quite "gotten" the
> term muscatel used with Darjeeling, mainly because I don't drink any
> alcohol, so the only place I'd run into the term is in tea. However,
> about a month ago, a tea friend had purchased some Muscat grapes and
> gave me some. My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> like second flush Darjeeling!" So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea.
>
> --Michael J. Coffey--
> www.Teageek.net
> Ironic, isn't it?


Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
"muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
how it is.

- Dominic
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Default darjeeling muscatel?

Dominic T. wrote:
I'll make a note of this. I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.

Jim

> On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

....Lucy in the grape pit...
> > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > like second flush Darjeeling!" So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea.
> >
> > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > www.Teageek.net
> > Ironic, isn't it?

>
> Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> how it is.
>
> - Dominic

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Default darjeeling muscatel?

Dominic T. wrote:
I'll make a note of this. I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.

Jim

> On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

....Lucy in the grape pit...
> > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > like second flush Darjeeling!" So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea.
> >
> > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > www.Teageek.net
> > Ironic, isn't it?

>
> Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> how it is.
>
> - Dominic

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On Jul 12, 3:04*am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> Dominic T. wrote:
>
> I'll make a note of this. *I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
> like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.
>
> Jim
>
> > On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

>
> ...Lucy in the grape pit...
>
> > > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > > like second flush Darjeeling!" *So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea. *

>
> > > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > > *www.Teageek.net
> > > * Ironic, isn't it?

>
> > Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> > Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> > than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> > muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> > just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> > are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> > also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> > "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> > how it is.

>
> > - Dominic


Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas? Muscatel in
darjeeling is often a hint, a suggestion of a note. Ever tried aged
silver needles? If it is good you'll get a strong note of dark
chocolate. If your wife likes chocolate, this might be a good
suggestion to make her fall in love with white tea...

kevo
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On Jul 14, 3:50*am, Kevo > wrote:
> On Jul 12, 3:04*am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
>
>
>
> > Dominic T. wrote:

>
> > I'll make a note of this. *I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
> > like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.

>
> > Jim

>
> > > On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

>
> > ...Lucy in the grape pit...

>
> > > > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > > > like second flush Darjeeling!" *So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > > > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea. *

>
> > > > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > > > *www.Teageek.net
> > > > * Ironic, isn't it?

>
> > > Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> > > Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> > > than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> > > muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> > > just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> > > are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> > > also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> > > "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> > > how it is.

>
> > > - Dominic

>
> Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas? Muscatel in
> darjeeling is often a hint, a suggestion of a note. Ever tried aged
> silver needles? If it is good you'll get a strong note of dark
> chocolate. If your wife likes chocolate, this might be a good


err.. dark, not white chocolate? Doesn't make sense. -ak





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Default darjeeling muscatel?

I've had some lao cong shui xian that taste like it was fossilized. I
have some 25 year old silver needles which is better than anything I
can get today. Once again it is the taste back then versus the taste
now. The same goes for Darjeeling in clay pots I got 20 years ago.
Well stored teas should stand the test of time if the detrimental
factors are minimized.


Jim


Kevo wrote:
> On Jul 12, 3:04?am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> > Dominic T. wrote:
> >
> > I'll make a note of this. ?I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
> > like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.
> >
> > Jim
> >
> > > On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

> >
> > ...Lucy in the grape pit...
> >
> > > > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > > > like second flush Darjeeling!" ?So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > > > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea. ?

> >
> > > > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > > > ?www.Teageek.net
> > > > ? Ironic, isn't it?

> >
> > > Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> > > Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> > > than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> > > muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> > > just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> > > are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> > > also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> > > "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> > > how it is.

> >
> > > - Dominic

>
> Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas? Muscatel in
> darjeeling is often a hint, a suggestion of a note. Ever tried aged
> silver needles? If it is good you'll get a strong note of dark
> chocolate. If your wife likes chocolate, this might be a good
> suggestion to make her fall in love with white tea...
>
> kevo

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On Jul 14, 5:12*pm, Rainy > wrote:
> On Jul 14, 3:50*am, Kevo > wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Jul 12, 3:04*am, Space Cowboy > wrote:

>
> > > Dominic T. wrote:

>
> > > I'll make a note of this. *I suspect that'll make any Darjeeling taste
> > > like muscatel which as it turns out will be no big deal.

>
> > > Jim

>
> > > > On Jul 11, 10:05 am, Tea Geek > wrote:

>
> > > ...Lucy in the grape pit...

>
> > > > > My first thought on eating one was "Hey, this tastes
> > > > > like second flush Darjeeling!" *So if you can find some Muscat grapes,
> > > > > check them out and then re-try Darjeeling tea. *

>
> > > > > --Michael J. Coffey--
> > > > > *www.Teageek.net
> > > > > * Ironic, isn't it?

>
> > > > Even better is a little known gem found in Asian markets, Sac Sac
> > > > Muscat drink. It comes in a little can about half or even a bit less
> > > > than a regular soda can and is pure muscat grape juice with bits of
> > > > muscat grape in it. One of my favorite things in life. Also, maybe
> > > > just because I'm of Italian heritage Muscato wine or Muscato D'Asti
> > > > are both great (but alcoholic) beverages. Just plain muscat grapes are
> > > > also a joy. I had never thought about the fact that the term
> > > > "muscatel" could be a bit confusing until this post but I could see
> > > > how it is.

>
> > > > - Dominic

>
> > Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas? Muscatel in
> > darjeeling is often a hint, a suggestion of a note. Ever tried aged
> > silver needles? If it is good you'll get a strong note of dark
> > chocolate. If your wife likes chocolate, this might be a good

>
> err.. dark, not white chocolate? Doesn't make sense. -ak


Heheheh! Like a sugary white choc with a dark heart...

kevo
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> Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas?

I actually have a rock from Wuyi. And my tea tastes just like the rock.
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Default darjeeling muscatel?

niisonge > writes:

> > Does anyone get a real rock taste out of Wuyi Rock Teas?

>
> I actually have a rock from Wuyi. And my tea tastes just like the rock.


Which would you say is more cost-effective?

(he says, ducking)

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
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> Which would you say is more cost-effective?

I will tell you a little secret. You put the rock in your Yixing,
steep the rock, and you got real rock tea.
Hahaha.

Anyone want to come over for some rock tea?


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On Jul 14, 5:48*pm, niisonge > wrote:
> > Which would you say is more cost-effective?

>
> I will tell you a little secret. You put the rock in your Yixing,
> steep the rock, and you got real rock tea.
> Hahaha.
>
> Anyone want to come over for some rock tea?


Sort of like stone soup? Toci
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On Jul 14, 8:00*pm, toci > wrote:
> On Jul 14, 5:48*pm, niisonge > wrote:
>
> > > Which would you say is more cost-effective?

>
> > I will tell you a little secret. You put the rock in your Yixing,
> > steep the rock, and you got real rock tea.
> > Hahaha.

>
> > Anyone want to come over for some rock tea?

>
> Sort of like stone soup? * * Toci


Sorry to go more OT, but a funny story. Back in High School I had a
lab partner in a low level Chemistry class who wasn't the brightest
(no sharpener in his box of crayons) and the basic tests for things
are touch, smell, and taste. I had him convinced that he had to do all
of them on each thing we did for completeness. So routinely he would
touch metals that had just been over flame to see if they softened or
started to melt, or taste minerals and such. Watching the horror of
the teacher as he saw him popping different rocks/minerals in his
mouth was amazing. I particularly liked when he got to Sulfur, oh,
and BTW none of them were potentially deadly or harmful in the class
so at worst it was a slight branding from hot metal or a foul taste.

- Dominic
What is the steep time on a WuYi rock? I've tried multiple steeps but
it just isn't imparting any taste into my Yixing.
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> What is the steep time on a WuYi rock? I've tried multiple steeps but
> it just isn't imparting any taste into my Yixing.


Those are trade secrets. I learned it from the small family farmer-
producers. You would have to go to Wuyi and ask them yourself. But,
you can steep the rock hundreds, even thousands of times - and still
tastes like rock tea. Must be the longest-steeping tea yet.
:-)

Seriously though, I did try a Qilan at the tea market yesterday, and
as soon as I drank it, you could taste rock - with some floral notes
too.
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On Jul 15, 8:07*am, niisonge > wrote:
> > What is the steep time on a WuYi rock? I've tried multiple steeps but
> > it just isn't imparting any taste into my Yixing.

>
> Those are trade secrets. I learned it from the small family farmer-
> producers. You would have to go to Wuyi and ask them yourself. But,
> you can steep the rock hundreds, even thousands of times - and still
> tastes like rock tea. Must be the longest-steeping tea yet.
> :-)
>
> Seriously though, I did try a Qilan at the tea market yesterday, and
> as soon as I drank it, you could taste rock - with some floral notes
> too.


Rocks are made out of stuff. One can taste calcium, say, or iron.
Toci
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On Jul 15, 9:07*am, niisonge > wrote:

> Seriously though, I did try a Qilan at the tea market yesterday, and
> as soon as I drank it, you could taste rock - with some floral notes
> too.


can i have some of that Qilan ?



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alright,

who hijacked my darjeeling muscatel post to talk about rock tea ?

lol
j/k
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> can i have some of that Qilan ?

Sure, I sent you a small packet of 10 Kg in the mail already.
Hahahaha
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On Jul 15, 9:49*pm, niisonge > wrote:
> Sure, I sent you a small packet of 10 Kg in the mail already.
> Hahahaha


Heeey... quit teasing

you know i cant drink that much Qilan !!
heheheh
...
or can i ...
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> you know i cant drink that much Qilan !!
> heheheh
> ...
> or can i ...


If you want to try some, I'm sure I can send you some real Qilan.
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"Space Cowboy" > wrote

I call some white
> tea taste ephemeral. Some will argue you have to brew it right. I
> think the tasting temperature is more important, slightly less than
> medium hot or a little more hot than warm. I prefer glass for
> tasting. Its not a casual tea. You have to be in the moment with a
> clean pallette. Another approach is load the pot and discover the
> taste in multiple infusions.


I can't help but suspect that all we are trying to do is to catch
a moment so ephemeral that it hangs before us tantalizingly seducing
us to capture it. But no sooner do you feel you have it, then it gets away.
We seem to be doomed to the futility of trying to keep things so elusive
that they don't let us keep them, even for a while. Isn't it that such is
a tea-like tea?
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