Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 08-12-2007, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!


My tap water is terrible and I switched to drinking distilled water a long
time ago, making tea with it, too. I know everybody says it makes tea taste
flat, but it's been tasting fresh and crisp to me.

While in LA this past spring, where the water is even worse, I got tired of
looking for water and paying deposits for the containers. I switched to
refilling my gallon jugs from a 25-cent RO machine. After a while of doing
that, I got tired of lugging the jugs downstairs and up again and bought a
Brita filtering pitcher.

About two weeks ago, I went back to distilled water out of curiosity. I'm
supposed to change my filter, soon, and I wanted to see if I could tell the
difference with tea made with distilled water and water made from the old
filter and new filter. Distilled water stills gives me that fresh, crisp
sensation and on a whim, I bought a bottle of spring water.

Wow, what a difference! Yes, distilled water gives a distinctly flat
sensation to my tea while spring water gives a very nice, soft, rounded
feeling.

Unfortunately, my next bottle of spring water came from a different store
and the spring is in a different state. The difference isn't as remarkable
and I don't like it as much. It might be because the water wasn't processed
the same.

So, now I get to be a connoisseur of spring waters as well as of teas and
brewing methods to get the most from the experience.


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Old 08-12-2007, 09:24 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 8, 2:09 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:
My tap water is terrible and I switched to drinking distilled water a long
time ago, making tea with it, too. I know everybody says it makes tea taste
flat, but it's been tasting fresh and crisp to me.

While in LA this past spring, where the water is even worse, I got tired of
looking for water and paying deposits for the containers. I switched to
refilling my gallon jugs from a 25-cent RO machine. After a while of doing
that, I got tired of lugging the jugs downstairs and up again and bought a
Brita filtering pitcher.

About two weeks ago, I went back to distilled water out of curiosity. I'm
supposed to change my filter, soon, and I wanted to see if I could tell the
difference with tea made with distilled water and water made from the old
filter and new filter. Distilled water stills gives me that fresh, crisp
sensation and on a whim, I bought a bottle of spring water.

Wow, what a difference! Yes, distilled water gives a distinctly flat
sensation to my tea while spring water gives a very nice, soft, rounded
feeling.

Unfortunately, my next bottle of spring water came from a different store
and the spring is in a different state. The difference isn't as remarkable
and I don't like it as much. It might be because the water wasn't processed
the same.

So, now I get to be a connoisseur of spring waters as well as of teas and
brewing methods to get the most from the experience.


I use poland spring water. I signed up for home delivery where they
give you
5 huge bottles a month (for me about 2.5-3 is enough for month, so I
sometimes
will call them and tell them not to deliver one month). I believe they
are
5 gallon bottles. Poland spring is the better tasting spring water of
the ones
I tried, as water, because I haven't tried others to make tea. Poland
spring
in 1/2 liter bottles (or smaller) is the best-tasting, it's
significantly better than
the water from 1 gallon or 5 gallon bottles. It's hard to describe but
it tastles
a little like very diluted carrot juice taste, and at the same time
this taste
seems to add freshness. It tastes almost as good as a really good tea.
By the way, these bottles are bottled from a different spring. In
fact, they
list a number of springs on the bottle. But it may be that this great
taste
is actually caused by the type of plastic they use for these bottles,
I'm not
sure. If that is the case, you'd expect small bottles' water to taste
better
because ratio of inner plastic surface is greater. It may also be that
smaller bottles are fresher because they make better money on them
and they try to bring you the freshest water in them to encourage us
to
buy these more expensive (per volume) bottles.

Anyway, the water in NY is reportedly one of the best in the country,
but I could never stand tap water - there's too much metallic taste.
It
may be in part because of my old building, though. Even the filter
doesn't do much to alleviate the metallic taste.

I'd like to hear opinions on what spring water is best for teas.

By the way, the method of boiling the water is also important for
taste.
When I use an electric range, tea tastes differently, and I don't like
it,
even though it's hard for me to describe the difference. Black teas
taste a little sweeter but at the same time muddier. It may be beacuse
of the time it takes to boil the water, I noticed that if water is
boiled
slowly, using small flame of gas range, you also can get similar
effect,
the best tea I manage to make happens when I boil the water as
quickly as possible, with almost maximum flame, even though
kettle instructions usually say not to use maximum flame.

Obviously, in a strongly brewed ceylon or assam with plenty of milk,
the difference in water is probably not as big. For mild whites and
greens, on the other hand...






--
~~Bluesea~~
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Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 08-12-2007, 09:32 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 8, 2:09 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:
My tap water is terrible and I switched to drinking distilled water a long
time ago, making tea with it, too. I know everybody says it makes tea taste
flat, but it's been tasting fresh and crisp to me.

While in LA this past spring, where the water is even worse, I got tired of
looking for water and paying deposits for the containers. I switched to
refilling my gallon jugs from a 25-cent RO machine. After a while of doing
that, I got tired of lugging the jugs downstairs and up again and bought a
Brita filtering pitcher.

About two weeks ago, I went back to distilled water out of curiosity. I'm
supposed to change my filter, soon, and I wanted to see if I could tell the
difference with tea made with distilled water and water made from the old
filter and new filter. Distilled water stills gives me that fresh, crisp
sensation and on a whim, I bought a bottle of spring water.

Wow, what a difference! Yes, distilled water gives a distinctly flat
sensation to my tea while spring water gives a very nice, soft, rounded
feeling.

Unfortunately, my next bottle of spring water came from a different store
and the spring is in a different state. The difference isn't as remarkable
and I don't like it as much. It might be because the water wasn't processed
the same.

So, now I get to be a connoisseur of spring waters as well as of teas and
brewing methods to get the most from the experience.


I forgot to add a few things.. Plastic matters for the bottled spring
water.
Clear plastic is much better, the other kind will often give a
distinct plastic
flavor to the water. I would mostly buy Poland Spring 1-gallon bottles
because they're the most widely available clear bottles and also
because
they can stack on top of each other.

There are two more expensive brands - Evian and Fuji. Fuji is about
the
same as Poland but without sweetness, it's more neutral, but it's only
sold in small expensive bottles, and small bottles of Poland still
taste
better. Evian is just terrible, maybe it's just me but I can't stand
it.



--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 09-12-2007, 04:11 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 68
Default Water - I've seen the light!


wrote in message
...

I use poland spring water. I signed up for home delivery where they
give you
5 huge bottles a month (for me about 2.5-3 is enough for month, so I
sometimes
will call them and tell them not to deliver one month). I believe they
are
5 gallon bottles. Poland spring is the better tasting spring water of
the ones
I tried, as water, because I haven't tried others to make tea. Poland
spring
in 1/2 liter bottles (or smaller) is the best-tasting, it's
significantly better than
the water from 1 gallon or 5 gallon bottles. It's hard to describe but
it tastles
a little like very diluted carrot juice taste, and at the same time
this taste
seems to add freshness. It tastes almost as good as a really good tea.
By the way, these bottles are bottled from a different spring. In
fact, they list a number of springs on the bottle.


Oho, a blend!

But it may be that this great
taste
is actually caused by the type of plastic they use for these bottles,


There should be a triangle on the bottom with a numeral within the perimeter
of the triangle. There should also be some letters under the base of the
triangle. The codes I remember a

1 - PET/PETE
2 - HDPE
3 - ?
4 - LDPE
5 - PP
6 - ?
7 - Other. Some manufacturers are more specific and put PC or SA N or
whatever.

I'm not
sure. If that is the case, you'd expect small bottles' water to taste
better
because ratio of inner plastic surface is greater. It may also be that
smaller bottles are fresher because they make better money on them
and they try to bring you the freshest water in them to encourage us
to buy these more expensive (per volume) bottles.


The two sizes may also be made of different plastics. Some are definitely
better than others. I prefer the #1 PET/PETE and #7 PC/SAN followed by the
#4 LDPE. I don't recall what water smells or tastes like after being in a #5
PP container, but I definitely don't like the odor or flavor that transfers
from an HDPE container.

Anyway, the water in NY is reportedly one of the best in the country,
but I could never stand tap water - there's too much metallic taste.
It
may be in part because of my old building, though. Even the filter
doesn't do much to alleviate the metallic taste.


How does tap water taste in a new building?

I'd like to hear opinions on what spring water is best for teas.


The only ones I've tried are from the Welpman Spring in Morgan County, MO
and Samantha Springs of Keller, TX. The Welpman water is slightly salty and
has a bite while the Samantha water is sweet and smooth. This was to drink,
but that transfers over to tea, also. I prefer the Samantha water.

By the way, the method of boiling the water is also important for
taste.


I haven't gotten that far. I can tell the difference between zapped water
and boiled, but nothing else.

--
~~Bluesea~~
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Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 09-12-2007, 04:22 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 68
Default Water - I've seen the light!


wrote in message
...

I forgot to add a few things.. Plastic matters for the bottled spring
water.


As far as I'm concerned, plastic matters for any water.

Clear plastic is much better, the other kind will often give a
distinct plastic flavor to the water.


See my other reply about the types of food-grade plastic. From what you
describe, I'm going to guess that the clear plastic is PET/PETE or PP and
the flavoring plastic is HDPE, possibly LDPE, but much less so than if it's
HDPE. If the clear plastic is hard, since you're able to stack them, I don't
know what it is. It may be one of the plastics I already mentioned, just
thicker for strength.

--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.




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Old 09-12-2007, 04:55 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 8, 1:24 pm, wrote:
On Dec 8, 2:09 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:


I'd like to hear opinions on what spring water is best for teas.


I spent a few months in Iowa, and had to find a different source of
water than the poor (for tea) well water. After trying all the
potential bottled waters at a variety of stores, the best to be found
in that region is 'deep rock' water packaged near Denver. Perhaps my
taste buds are too tainted, as I thought one of the most thoughtful
gifts I have ever recieved (and best tea water I had while in Iowa)
was a gallon of Colorado Springs tap water from a family member who
was on their way through the state. I would strongly bet on Colorado,
or another mountainous state's, water surpassing New York water for
tea production, as even municipal water systems are filled by melted
snow and spring water.
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:02 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 8, 10:55 pm, TeaDave wrote:
On Dec 8, 1:24 pm, wrote:

On Dec 8, 2:09 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:
I'd like to hear opinions on what spring water is best for teas.


I spent a few months in Iowa, and had to find a different source of
water than the poor (for tea) well water. After trying all the
potential bottled waters at a variety of stores, the best to be found
in that region is 'deep rock' water packaged near Denver. Perhaps my
taste buds are too tainted, as I thought one of the most thoughtful
gifts I have ever recieved (and best tea water I had while in Iowa)
was a gallon of Colorado Springs tap water from a family member who
was on their way through the state. I would strongly bet on Colorado,
or another mountainous state's, water surpassing New York water for
tea production, as even municipal water systems are filled by melted
snow and spring water.


IIRC NYC water comes from a natural reservoir in mountaineous area
(there are mountains in NY too, although not of Everest stature).
I think the water is very good at the source, but it gets worse as
it travels in pipes. Also, isn't it true that all tap water, no matter
where
it is, will be chlorinated and fluorized? I have no idea, but they'd
probably do it even if it wasn't necessary, just in case.
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:14 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 68
Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 8, 10:22 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:
wrote in message

...



I forgot to add a few things.. Plastic matters for the bottled spring
water.


As far as I'm concerned, plastic matters for any water.


I don't doubt that, I don't actually use plastic anywhere near my
water or tea except for getting spring water in plastic bottles.


Clear plastic is much better, the other kind will often give a
distinct plastic flavor to the water.


See my other reply about the types of food-grade plastic. From what you
describe, I'm going to guess that the clear plastic is PET/PETE or PP and
the flavoring plastic is HDPE, possibly LDPE, but much less so than if it's


Well, the clear plastic is really the same as in 80% of all small
bottles of
water you can pick up in a corner store. There may be some variations
among
them but not too much.

HDPE. If the clear plastic is hard, since you're able to stack them, I don't
know what it is. It may be one of the plastics I already mentioned, just
thicker for strength.


Well, it's really a matter of the shape of bottle. I don't think
there's any plastic
used for any type of water that would fold if it was in this shape:

http://www.packagingdigest.com/artic...images/6f5.jpg

This one's not Poland, although I've only seen this shape used for
Poland
around here.


--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 09-12-2007, 09:37 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 68
Default Water - I've seen the light!



Bluesea wrote:
wrote in message
...

I use poland spring water. I signed up for home delivery where they
give you
5 huge bottles a month (for me about 2.5-3 is enough for month, so I
sometimes
will call them and tell them not to deliver one month). I believe they
are
5 gallon bottles. Poland spring is the better tasting spring water of
the ones
I tried, as water, because I haven't tried others to make tea. Poland
spring
in 1/2 liter bottles (or smaller) is the best-tasting, it's
significantly better than
the water from 1 gallon or 5 gallon bottles. It's hard to describe but
it tastles
a little like very diluted carrot juice taste, and at the same time
this taste
seems to add freshness. It tastes almost as good as a really good tea.
By the way, these bottles are bottled from a different spring. In
fact, they list a number of springs on the bottle.


Oho, a blend!

But it may be that this great
taste
is actually caused by the type of plastic they use for these bottles,


There should be a triangle on the bottom with a numeral within the perimeter
of the triangle. There should also be some letters under the base of the
triangle. The codes I remember a

1 - PET/PETE
2 - HDPE
3 - ?
4 - LDPE
5 - PP
6 - ?
7 - Other. Some manufacturers are more specific and put PC or SA N or
whatever.


Both small .5L and 3L bottle (I just checked, it's not a 1 gallon as I
thought),
are PETE. But smaller bottle's water is tastier. And the sources are
the
same except that small bottles include actual poland spring but the
larger
bottle does not. Both say and/or white cedar spring, so this may vary
by
bottle size too. I actually asked Poland spring on the phone once if
this
is something they're aware of, they pretended they have no idea what
I'm talking about (maybe they really have no idea.. maybe they don't
even
drink the water - tap is just fine, whatever).


I'm not
sure. If that is the case, you'd expect small bottles' water to taste
better
because ratio of inner plastic surface is greater. It may also be that
smaller bottles are fresher because they make better money on them
and they try to bring you the freshest water in them to encourage us
to buy these more expensive (per volume) bottles.


The two sizes may also be made of different plastics. Some are definitely
better than others. I prefer the #1 PET/PETE and #7 PC/SAN followed by the
#4 LDPE. I don't recall what water smells or tastes like after being in a #5
PP container, but I definitely don't like the odor or flavor that transfers
from an HDPE container.

Anyway, the water in NY is reportedly one of the best in the country,
but I could never stand tap water - there's too much metallic taste.
It
may be in part because of my old building, though. Even the filter
doesn't do much to alleviate the metallic taste.


How does tap water taste in a new building?


No idea.. I've been to old buildings only.. Actually once it was sort
of
a new building but they had a special very expensive filter system
installed
that was supposed to give some sort of spiritually clean water (I'm
not
kidding, and they payed about 15 hundred for the system).
It did taste better than regular filter water though. Not as good as
Poland.


I'd like to hear opinions on what spring water is best for teas.


The only ones I've tried are from the Welpman Spring in Morgan County, MO
and Samantha Springs of Keller, TX. The Welpman water is slightly salty and
has a bite while the Samantha water is sweet and smooth. This was to drink,
but that transfers over to tea, also. I prefer the Samantha water.

By the way, the method of boiling the water is also important for
taste.


I haven't gotten that far. I can tell the difference between zapped water
and boiled, but nothing else.


I never tried microwave. We threw ours out anyway. Microwave isn't
even
good for the food, I'm sure it's even worse for tea.


--
~~Bluesea~~
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Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.

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Old 09-12-2007, 05:56 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 9, 10:45 am, Lewis Perin wrote:
writes:
[...]
I think the water is very good at the source, but it gets worse as
it travels in pipes. Also, isn't it true that all tap water, no
matter where it is, will be chlorinated and fluorized?


If you're worried about fluoride, you probably shouldn't be drinking
tea at all.


I'm not worried about what's in tea itself, but the additional amount
of fluoride and its possible effect on taste. -andrei



/Lew
---
Lew Perin /


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Old 10-12-2007, 09:49 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 74
Default Water - I've seen the light!

I would like to mention that my tea group in LA has tried a lot of
waters, the 365 Whole Foods water is preferred spring water. However
a few of us swear by reverse osmosis water to which we add back a few
drops of concentrated ionic minerals (I use concentrace brand). It's
more consistent and better than most spring waters.


On Dec 8, 11:09 am, "Bluesea" wrote:
My tap water is terrible and I switched to drinking distilled water a long
time ago, making tea with it, too. I know everybody says it makes tea taste
flat, but it's been tasting fresh and crisp to me.

While in LA this past spring, where the water is even worse, I got tired of
looking for water and paying deposits for the containers. I switched to
refilling my gallon jugs from a 25-cent RO machine. After a while of doing
that, I got tired of lugging the jugs downstairs and up again and bought a
Brita filtering pitcher.

About two weeks ago, I went back to distilled water out of curiosity. I'm
supposed to change my filter, soon, and I wanted to see if I could tell the
difference with tea made with distilled water and water made from the old
filter and new filter. Distilled water stills gives me that fresh, crisp
sensation and on a whim, I bought a bottle of spring water.

Wow, what a difference! Yes, distilled water gives a distinctly flat
sensation to my tea while spring water gives a very nice, soft, rounded
feeling.

Unfortunately, my next bottle of spring water came from a different store
and the spring is in a different state. The difference isn't as remarkable
and I don't like it as much. It might be because the water wasn't processed
the same.

So, now I get to be a connoisseur of spring waters as well as of teas and
brewing methods to get the most from the experience.

--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 10-12-2007, 02:16 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Posts: 226
Default Water - I've seen the light!

If you like it crisp and clean, try Iceland Spring. Very good.

It's actually a lot of fun drinking different kinds of water, bottled
or not, as a tasting on its own. You can tell which one's nice and
which one isn't.

MarshalN
http://www.xanga.com/MarshalN

Bluesea wrote:
My tap water is terrible and I switched to drinking distilled water a long
time ago, making tea with it, too. I know everybody says it makes tea taste
flat, but it's been tasting fresh and crisp to me.

While in LA this past spring, where the water is even worse, I got tired of
looking for water and paying deposits for the containers. I switched to
refilling my gallon jugs from a 25-cent RO machine. After a while of doing
that, I got tired of lugging the jugs downstairs and up again and bought a
Brita filtering pitcher.

About two weeks ago, I went back to distilled water out of curiosity. I'm
supposed to change my filter, soon, and I wanted to see if I could tell the
difference with tea made with distilled water and water made from the old
filter and new filter. Distilled water stills gives me that fresh, crisp
sensation and on a whim, I bought a bottle of spring water.

Wow, what a difference! Yes, distilled water gives a distinctly flat
sensation to my tea while spring water gives a very nice, soft, rounded
feeling.

Unfortunately, my next bottle of spring water came from a different store
and the spring is in a different state. The difference isn't as remarkable
and I don't like it as much. It might be because the water wasn't processed
the same.

So, now I get to be a connoisseur of spring waters as well as of teas and
brewing methods to get the most from the experience.


--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.

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Old 10-12-2007, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!

On Dec 10, 3:49 am, Danica wrote:
I would like to mention that my tea group in LA has tried a lot of
waters, the 365 Whole Foods water is preferred spring water. However
a few of us swear by reverse osmosis water to which we add back a few
drops of concentrated ionic minerals (I use concentrace brand). It's
more consistent and better than most spring waters.


How does Poland compare to other spring waters?

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Old 10-12-2007, 10:30 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Water - I've seen the light!


wrote in message
...
Also, isn't it true that all tap water, no matter where
it is, will be chlorinated and fluorized? I have no idea, but they'd
probably do it even if it wasn't necessary, just in case.


Not all communities add fluoride to their water. It depends on whether or
not they want the controversial type of fluoride that's essentially an
industrial waste product and whether or not the noncontroversial type of
fluoride is already in their water naturally.

--
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Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.




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