Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 24-07-2007, 04:16 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?

Curious,

Melinda



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Old 24-07-2007, 03:37 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

Excellent observation. I don't think it has been brought up before.
I don't have a clue. But I will say the 'red' color between Indian-
Ceylon-Africa teas and the traditional Chinese red teas is quite
noticeable. The Indians are tan brown and Chinese almost a blood
red. I think what you see is absorption of this difference due to
curdling. Another possibility are the tannin levels which would act
as a pigment with the milk. I'd pay attention to the 'slick' or
'sheen' that can be seen on the tea surface in reflected light. I'd
guess the Indian teas are producing more and the Chinese less just
because Indian teas are good for one pot and the Chinese reds possibly
more than one.

Jim

PS I drink my teas nude and sometimes that way myself but I'm darn
careful.

Melinda wrote:
Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?

Curious,

Melinda


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Old 24-07-2007, 07:36 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

On Jul 24, 9:37 am, Space Cowboy wrote:
Excellent observation. I don't think it has been brought up before.
I don't have a clue. But I will say the 'red' color between Indian-
Ceylon-Africa teas and the traditional Chinese red teas is quite
noticeable. The Indians are tan brown and Chinese almost a blood
red. I think what you see is absorption of this difference due to
curdling. Another possibility are the tannin levels which would act
as a pigment with the milk. I'd pay attention to the 'slick' or
'sheen' that can be seen on the tea surface in reflected light. I'd
guess the Indian teas are producing more and the Chinese less just
because Indian teas are good for one pot and the Chinese reds possibly
more than one.

Jim

PS I drink my teas nude and sometimes that way myself but I'm darn
careful.



Melinda wrote:
Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?


Curious,


Melinda- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I'd try at least an apron. Toci

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Old 25-07-2007, 11:43 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

On Jul 24, 10:37 am, Space Cowboy wrote:

The Indians are tan brown and Chinese almost a blood red.


hmmm...
out of context, but interesting discovery... :P

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Old 02-08-2007, 06:56 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color


Melinda ha scritto:
Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?

Curious,

Melinda

Have you tried any Malawi tea - this is particulalry known for its red color when milk is added - its a kind of brick red. Much of it is used in brands like tetly which have long marketed their teas as being particualry 'red'


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Old 02-09-2007, 10:54 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color


"ackmw" wrote in message
...

Melinda ha scritto:
Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have
noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone
else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?

Curious,

Melinda

Have you tried any Malawi tea - this is particulalry known for its red
color when milk is added - its a kind of brick red. Much of it is used in
brands like tetly which have long marketed their teas as being particualry
'red'


--
Questo articolo e` stato inviato dal sito web http://www.nonsolonews.net


Yes actually I like the Chisunga Estate Malawi BOP from Upton very well for
a basic breakfast type with milk and sugar. I like it better thatn the
Kenyan CTC that I've tried. I will have to try the other types of Malawi
teas though...Upton only has the one Malawi from what I know. The comment
from you above about Malawi teas being China type surprises me as I thought
(from their taste) that they'd be more Indian Ceylon type (or at least the
one I get from Upton would be...maybe it is).

Melinda


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Old 03-09-2007, 04:34 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

On Sep 2, 10:54 am, "Melinda" wrote:
The comment
from you above about Malawi teas being China type surprises me as I thought
(from their taste) that they'd be more Indian Ceylon type (or at least the
one I get from Upton would be...maybe it is).


The type of processing that Alexander of Satemwa gives his China type
Malawi teas is nothing like a typical China type will normally
receive. He used LTP (the Lawrie Tea Processor) that is even more
aggressive than the CTC machine in popping the cells and initiating
oxidation. The resulting liquor redness is a fair match for any Assam
CTC though the very same leaf from the very same bush (yes, I am back
to my tea bush) will give a wonderful white tea when hand processed.
I would not sell Alexander's black tea as specialty (and neither would
he offer it) but we are both proud to offer the Satemwa range of
Malawi whites - needles, peony, pearls and antlers made from six or
seven different cultivars.

Nigel at Teacraft

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Old 03-09-2007, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

On Jul 24, 4:16 am, "Melinda" wrote:
Well I don't think I've seen this discussed here before so here goes: I
usually drink my red teas with milk and sugar. When I do that I have noticed
that the Assams and Ceylons and the African teas too are a sort of a tan
color while the China reds (keemun, yunnan, and kind of congou) have a
greyish cast to the color of the liquid (this is with milk). Has anyone else
noticed that and what do you think causes it?

Chana black teas (reds) are not manufactured with milk in mind - they
are longer oxidised than a tea intended for milk. Long oxidation
gives little Theaflavin (the bright orange astringent polyphenol) and
a lot of the dull brown polyphenol Thearubigin which is formed fron
condensed polymerized theaflavin - orthodox manufacture as the China
tea receive also favors thearubigin. These China teas have a greyness
when milked which in excess is termed slatey (ISO tea term No.2228).
Shorter oxidation teas, particularly CTC teas from East africa and
Assam intended for the milk loving UK, Irish and Pakistani markets
have a higher ratio of TF versus TR (they are dried before the process
proceeds too far along theTR route) and present red orange (tan) in
the cup.
I remember making some very good milkers in China using China leaf and
CTC - which passed for Assams - same leaf, different process!.

Nigel at Teacraft

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Old 04-09-2007, 03:15 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

Another reason you should shop ethnic markets for tea. You'll never
find two brands of the same type that taste the same.

Jim

PS I can't believe the fresh leaf from a tea bush in Africa would
taste the same as one from China.

Nigel wrote:
Shorter oxidation teas, particularly CTC teas from East africa and
Assam intended for the milk loving UK, Irish and Pakistani markets
have a higher ratio of TF versus TR (they are dried before the process
proceeds too far along theTR route) and present red orange (tan) in
the cup.


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Old 05-09-2007, 05:59 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default China reds vs Indian reds color

Space Cowboy wrote:
Another reason you should shop ethnic markets for tea. You'll never
find two brands of the same type that taste the same.


Hell, for a lot of those brands, you won't find two boxes that taste the
same.

PS I can't believe the fresh leaf from a tea bush in Africa would
taste the same as one from China.


I can believe it, BUT I can believe that the extensive processing required
would kind of kill the subtlety and art of the whole thing. That's not
necessarily a bad thing in some cases, though.
--scott

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