Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Default Request translation from chinese

Got 2 oolongs from WHF
now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
translation,

Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

image: http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

thank you.
SN

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Default Request translation from chinese

On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:
> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> translation,
>
> Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,
>
> image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg
>
> thank you.

SN

The one on the left says:

An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
(Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)

The one on the right says:

Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
(gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
describing tea or wine.)


These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.

Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.

Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
doing?

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Default Request translation from chinese

I find a statement like "An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin" to be
more technically correct than a misrepesentation. In this case it is
a TGY from Anxi. The Dong Ding area does not exist in mainland China
perse. It is a mountain in Taiwan. You can still imply it was a
source varietal transported to Taiwan. Normally TGY is given it's
specific location in southern Fujian. On mainland packaging you will
see the general term Dong Ding TGY if the specific location doesn't
replace Dong Ding. On Taiwanese packaging you will see the
transliterated term Tung Ting for the varietal specific to that
nation.

Jim

PS I don't read rags. If you go to that website you will see the
preview article on Taiwan Dong Ding from the last issue. You won't
see what I just told you. I am a shopper in Chinatown. I see Dong
Ding TGY and I assume it is from Taiwan. I see Tung Ting what the
hell is that? From that article alone the tea in your cup may not be
what you think it is. While I'm here the single character on the
packaging for PouChong isn't the two for BaoZhong.


On May 4, 1:23 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> > now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> > translation,

>
> > Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> > mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

>
> > image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

>
> > thank you.

>
> SN
>
> The one on the left says:
>
> An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
> (Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
> The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)
>
> The one on the right says:
>
> Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
> (gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
> means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
> describing tea or wine.)
>
> These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
> but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
> Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
> Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
> either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
> tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.
>
> Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
> or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.
>
> Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
> those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
> doing?



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Default Request translation from chinese

On May 4, 12:23 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> > now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> > translation,

>
> > Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> > mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

>
> > image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

>
> > thank you.

>
> SN
>
> The one on the left says:
>
> An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
> (Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
> The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)
>
> The one on the right says:
>
> Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
> (gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
> means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
> describing tea or wine.)
>
> These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
> but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
> Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
> Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
> either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
> tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.
>
> Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
> or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.
>
> Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
> those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
> doing?


Wow! It's interesting that WHF puts English on their labels now.. That
must be something new.
Occasionally, I get a tea there that I'm fond of and then they change
its sku (code number).
I would not be surprised in the least to learn that the label has
little or nothing to do with the bag contents.
I purchased a little cup there recently for my little neice that was
clearly marked with a number and characters
on the box and shelf that translated to "fuzzy red toe cover".
Good luck! And, enjoy your tea!
Shen

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Default Request translation from chinese

On May 4, 12:23 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> > now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> > translation,

>
> > Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> > mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

>
> > image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

>
> > thank you.

>
> SN
>
> The one on the left says:
>
> An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
> (Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
> The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)
>
> The one on the right says:
>
> Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
> (gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
> means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
> describing tea or wine.)
>
> These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
> but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
> Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
> Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
> either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
> tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.
>
> Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
> or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.
>
> Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
> those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
> doing?


Mydnight,
WHF is Wing Hop Fung which is basically a dry goods store in both Los
Angeles (and Monterey Park) Chinatowns.
They do sell a great deal of tea. And you can taste from grotty little
yixing pots (that have seen myriad tea types) and a paper cup.
WHP has a tea called "Yellow Stone Mountain Dong Ding" which I buy
occasionally; but, there is no guarantee that what you read on the tea
jar in the store is what you've got in your bag.
My feelings: their teas are reasonable priced. If they have something
you like, taste some and buy it. If you enjoy it, what difference does
it make what it's called.
Most of the sales help in WHF really don't speak any English or
understand tea, for that matter; although the service seems better in
the Monterey Park store. And they don't quite understand our pinyin.
There is an elderly man in the downtown Chinatown shop that seems to
be tea-knowledgeable.
The place is great fun and you can find really wonderful bargains.
But, don't take the labelling seriously and watch out for their pu-
erhs which tend to be labelled and outrageously expensive.
Shen



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Default Request translation from chinese

On May 4, 10:04 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> I find a statement like "An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin" to be
> more technically correct than a misrepesentation. In this case it is
> a TGY from Anxi. The Dong Ding area does not exist in mainland China
> perse. It is a mountain in Taiwan. You can still imply it was a
> source varietal transported to Taiwan. Normally TGY is given it's
> specific location in southern Fujian. On mainland packaging you will
> see the general term Dong Ding TGY if the specific location doesn't
> replace Dong Ding. On Taiwanese packaging you will see the
> transliterated term Tung Ting for the varietal specific to that
> nation.


Lots of mainland vendors claim to have Taiwan tea, imported and all,
but really don't. All TGY comes from AnXi Fujian or it is not TGY.
They basically have the "patent" on that tea's name, if such a thing
as that does exist in China. On mainland packaging, if they are
honest, you will see exactly the tea that it is supposed to be inside
the package. In my several years of living in China, meeting hundreds
of different vendors, mainland and Taiwanese, and drinking countless
brewings of both of these types of teas, I have never heard of Dong
Ding TGY. I stand strong with my assumption that the shop is either
trying to create some kind of blend for marketing purposes or is up to
something dishonest. Regardless of your argument, TGY comes from
AnXi, Fujian and DongDing comes from Taiwan; so how could both names
appear in this tea especially after it's being cited as coming from
AnXi, Fujian?


> PS I don't read rags. If you go to that website you will see the
> preview article on Taiwan Dong Ding from the last issue. You won't
> see what I just told you. I am a shopper in Chinatown. I see Dong
> Ding TGY and I assume it is from Taiwan. I see Tung Ting what the
> hell is that? From that article alone the tea in your cup may not be
> what you think it is. While I'm here the single character on the
> packaging for PouChong isn't the two for BaoZhong.


Granted, but the package is from the mainland and the characters are
Chinese simplified. If it were from Taiwan, it would have the
Taiwanese styled characters. I get my Taiwan teas from my Taiwanese
friends, and I don't buy mainland Wulong anymore; I can taste the
difference. For instance, most of the "Taiwan Wulong tea" that is
sold in shops here is actually Jin Xuan and not that Wulong varietal
that most people know. Neat stuff you can pick up when you hang out
with tea people.

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On May 5, 12:49 am, Shen > wrote:
> On May 4, 12:23 am, Mydnight > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> > > now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> > > translation,

>
> > > Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> > > mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

>
> > > image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

>
> > > thank you.

>
> > SN

>
> > The one on the left says:

>
> > An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
> > (Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
> > The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)

>
> > The one on the right says:

>
> > Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
> > (gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
> > means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
> > describing tea or wine.)

>
> > These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
> > but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
> > Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
> > Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
> > either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
> > tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.

>
> > Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
> > or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.

>
> > Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
> > those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
> > doing?

>
> Mydnight,
> WHF is Wing Hop Fung which is basically a dry goods store in both Los
> Angeles (and Monterey Park) Chinatowns.
> They do sell a great deal of tea. And you can taste from grotty little
> yixing pots (that have seen myriad tea types) and a paper cup.
> WHP has a tea called "Yellow Stone Mountain Dong Ding" which I buy
> occasionally; but, there is no guarantee that what you read on the tea
> jar in the store is what you've got in your bag.
> My feelings: their teas are reasonable priced. If they have something
> you like, taste some and buy it. If you enjoy it, what difference does
> it make what it's called.
> Most of the sales help in WHF really don't speak any English or
> understand tea, for that matter; although the service seems better in
> the Monterey Park store. And they don't quite understand our pinyin.
> There is an elderly man in the downtown Chinatown shop that seems to
> be tea-knowledgeable.
> The place is great fun and you can find really wonderful bargains.
> But, don't take the labelling seriously and watch out for their pu-
> erhs which tend to be labelled and outrageously expensive.
> Shen- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Oh, I thought it was some kind of online vendor. If it's in the
States, there is a chance that they don't even know what kind of tea
it is. heh.

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Ok so it seems theres some mambo-jumbo on the labels just to have
something in english...
That sucks, since probably wont be able to find the equivalent
somewhere else, thus
need to re-test another store's products... maybe start buying
online....
its more fun in real stores tho... eh....

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On May 4, 3:23 pm, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 4, 3:01 pm, SN > wrote:> Got 2 oolongs from WHF
> > now they have labels with chinese on them, along with their english
> > translation,

>
> > Can you guys confirm the 'translation', and if you recognize a
> > mainstream tea category-type that can be found somewhere else,

>
> > image:http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ooongsah2.jpg

>
> > thank you.

>
> SN
>
> The one on the left says:
>
> An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin
> (Dong Ding TGY that comes from Anxi (TGY in Fujian comes from Anxi)?
> The "ji pin" means something higher graded.)
>
> The one on the right says:
>
> Gan Chun Wu Long Cha
> (gan is like the flavor between bitter and sweet; like hui gan. chun
> means like something pure; this character only usually appears when
> describing tea or wine.)
>
> These are mainland vendors? The left's script is simplified Chinese,
> but the tea says "Dong Ding", which as we all know, is an area in
> Taiwan that has a famous tea. I guess the vendor is saying they have
> Taiwanese teas but in fact it's just more mainland rubbish, they are
> either they blending some TGY with some Dong Ding Wulong to get that
> tea, or they just stole the name; which is not unheard of.
>
> Gan Chun Wulong, I have not heard of before. Could be another blend
> or just a generic name they gave for their wulong tea.
>
> Maybe these guys are creating their own brands? I have no idea what
> those numberings are. Maybe something about the blending they are
> doing?


Ji pin actually means "supreme grade", but of course, everybody on
Earth sells Ji Pin tea....

I must say Anxi Dong Ding TGY sounds extremely fishy to me. It can
either be Dong Ding, or from Anxi... but not both. I've never heard
of TGY made in Dong Ding before, and afaik there's no mountain in Anxi
named (coincidentally) Dong Ding....

What do the teas look like?

The tea on the right, Gan Chun Wulong, just means "Sweet - mellow -
Wulong". It's just a name you give to something. With the presence
of the words Gan and Chun, however, there's a slight chance that this
is some sort of Ginseng Wulong. Hard to say, again, without seeing
the tea itself.

And then there's the chance, like Shen says, that they have nothing to
do with the tea being sold whatsoever

MarshalN
http://www.xanga.com/MarshalN

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Dong Ding TGY is not an oxymoron. As I stated the source of the
varietal for Dong Ding mtn in Taiwan came from Fujian. You can refer
to it as Dong Ding TGY. Dong Ding is also a reference to leaf style.
It is lightly oxidized in nugget form. That style came directly from
the south of Fujian. That is the way it is made in Taiwan today.
Does Dong Ding TGY taste different than Tung Ting Taiwan?. Yes. By
Darwinian definition, it isn't TGY anymore. However it still can be
considered Dong Ding in the technical style and historic reference.
If you go to the .TW sites they still refer to Dong Ding as TGY. I
don't call them cons ripping me off saying TGY only comes from the
mainland. It is a relative term like the mainland Dong Ding. When I
buy Dong Ding or TGY I really want to know where it came from.

Jim

PS The only tea I've tasted from Fujian that tastes very close to
Taiwan mtn teas is BenShan. In fact I will say I probably couldn't
tell the two apart in a blind taste test.

On May 4, 11:34 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 4, 10:04 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:
>
> > I find a statement like "An Xi Ji Pin Dong Ding Tie Guan Yin" to be
> > more technically correct than a misrepesentation.

> In my several years of living in China, meeting hundreds
> of different vendors, mainland and Taiwanese, and drinking countless
> brewings of both of these types of teas, I have never heard of Dong
> Ding TGY. I stand strong with my assumption that the shop is either
> trying to create some kind of blend for marketing purposes or is up to
> something dishonest. Regardless of your argument, TGY comes from
> AnXi, Fujian and DongDing comes from Taiwan; so how could both names
> appear in this tea especially after it's being cited as coming from
> AnXi, Fujian?




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On May 5, 10:32 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> Dong Ding TGY is not an oxymoron. As I stated the source of the
> varietal for Dong Ding mtn in Taiwan came from Fujian. You can refer
> to it as Dong Ding TGY. Dong Ding is also a reference to leaf style.
> It is lightly oxidized in nugget form. That style came directly from
> the south of Fujian. That is the way it is made in Taiwan today.
> Does Dong Ding TGY taste different than Tung Ting Taiwan?. Yes. By
> Darwinian definition, it isn't TGY anymore. However it still can be
> considered Dong Ding in the technical style and historic reference.
> If you go to the .TW sites they still refer to Dong Ding as TGY. I
> don't call them cons ripping me off saying TGY only comes from the
> mainland. It is a relative term like the mainland Dong Ding. When I
> buy Dong Ding or TGY I really want to know where it came from.


Dong Ding Wulong Tea originally comes from Fujian, yes, hundreds of
years ago, but if any tea vendor claims to have mainland grown Dong
Ding Wulong, they are being dishonest. Dong Ding is a mountainous
area in Taiwan in Tai Zhong. There is no such thing as DDTGY unless
they mixed it together. There are no relative terms in tea. It's
either DD or TGY or dishonesty. Yes, most teas can be grown anywhere
like I had a decent LongJing that came from Guangxi, but something
lacks. But, it doesn't matter to me anyway, I don't drink mainland
Wulongs anymore.

> PS The only tea I've tasted from Fujian that tastes very close to
> Taiwan mtn teas is BenShan. In fact I will say I probably couldn't
> tell the two apart in a blind taste test.


The spooky thing about the mainland Wulongs is that you have no idea
what kinds of chemicals they add to their teas to make them taste that
way. There's no way to know what kind of tea you actually get,
anyway, unless you have friends in the business.

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> Ji pin actually means "supreme grade", but of course, everybody on
> Earth sells Ji Pin tea....


If it were "Gao Ji", I think that would mean more like high or supreme
grade. The "Ji" in this way, I think, just means it's a higher grade
than most teas.


> I must say Anxi Dong Ding TGY sounds extremely fishy to me. It can
> either be Dong Ding, or from Anxi... but not both. I've never heard
> of TGY made in Dong Ding before, and afaik there's no mountain in Anxi
> named (coincidentally) Dong Ding....


That's exactly what I am thinking. I guess they are just blending
stuff together or taking a handful of this tea and a handful of that
tea and throwing it in together.


> What do the teas look like?
>
> The tea on the right, Gan Chun Wulong, just means "Sweet - mellow -
> Wulong". It's just a name you give to something. With the presence
> of the words Gan and Chun, however, there's a slight chance that this
> is some sort of Ginseng Wulong. Hard to say, again, without seeing
> the tea itself.


I've never heard of any Wulong called that before.

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here's pic of leaf from "cold high top oolong",

http://img258.imageshack.us/my.php?i...ngwhfdrgz3.jpg

heres some tasting notes as much as i can describe:
flavor 3.5/7: ok flavor, aftertaste, very mild astringency.
mild tobaccoish (as i describe the 'darker' oolongs), very mild nutty/
buttery, some greenish feeling.

will find the other pic soon,
thanks!

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On May 7, 1:54 pm, SN > wrote:
> here's pic of leaf from "cold high top oolong",
>
> http://img258.imageshack.us/my.php?i...ngwhfdrgz3.jpg
>
> heres some tasting notes as much as i can describe:
> flavor 3.5/7: ok flavor, aftertaste, very mild astringency.
> mild tobaccoish (as i describe the 'darker' oolongs), very mild nutty/
> buttery, some greenish feeling.
>
> will find the other pic soon,
> thanks!


I'm going to go out on a limb now when I say this, but I think what
you got there is a few handfulls of 2 or 3 different teas mixed in the
same bag. The shorter, rounded looking ones look like Jin Xuan; the
longer ones look like some kind of wulong or possibly the TGY that the
title mentions. The tale tell sign that it is indeed mainland tea and
not Taiwanese is that the leaves have been picked away from the stems
and it appears to have been machine rolled; rather poorly, I might
add. There are some mainland rolled teas that aren't seperated from
the stems, indeed, but the vast majority aren't.

I think a grab bag of Jin Xuan, some random TGY, and perhaps a few
"nong xiang" roasted nuggets thrown in for the tobacco-ish flavor is
what that company calls "cold high top oolong".

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> There are some mainland rolled teas that aren't seperated from
> the stems, indeed, but the vast majority aren't.


Sorry, that makes little sense. I meant to say most mainland rolled
teas are seperated from the stems. There are a few kinds that remain
on the stem, though.



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The Chinese as scam artists is getting thin. How do you know your so
called Taiwanese teas aren't from some mainland front company on the
island selling your friends doctored tea? Dong Ding is the only
description I know that identifies the TKY exported to Taiwan way
back. Dong Ding is the only Fujian description I know that looks like
what is produced in Taiwan today. Nobody is trying to con anybody.
It's a matter of getting the usage correct. When I buy Yunnan Silver
Needles I know the difference from Fujian.

Jim

PS I want to mimic Taiwan teas. I'll doctor BenShan. That'll
fool'em. I'll go you one better. Tea can't hide the taste of
anything. You can hide the taste of tea.

On May 6, 5:06 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 5, 10:32 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:
>
> > PS The only tea I've tasted from Fujian that tastes very close to
> > Taiwan mtn teas is BenShan. In fact I will say I probably couldn't
> > tell the two apart in a blind taste test.

>
> The spooky thing about the mainland Wulongs is that you have no idea
> what kinds of chemicals they add to their teas to make them taste that
> way. There's no way to know what kind of tea you actually get,
> anyway, unless you have friends in the business.



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On May 8, 12:19 am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> The Chinese as scam artists is getting thin. How do you know your so
> called Taiwanese teas aren't from some mainland front company on the
> island selling your friends doctored tea? Dong Ding is the only
> description I know that identifies the TKY exported to Taiwan way
> back. Dong Ding is the only Fujian description I know that looks like
> what is produced in Taiwan today. Nobody is trying to con anybody.
> It's a matter of getting the usage correct. When I buy Yunnan Silver
> Needles I know the difference from Fujian.
> PS I want to mimic Taiwan teas. I'll doctor BenShan. That'll
> fool'em. I'll go you one better. Tea can't hide the taste of
> anything. You can hide the taste of tea.


My so-called, as you so strangely put it, Taiwanese tea was brought to
me FROM TAIWAN by my TAIWANESE FRIENDS who are in the TEA BUSINESS. I
thought this was pretty clear in my postings above. These same
friends will house me when I visit Taiwan this summer for the purpose
of tea. These are the same friends that treated me to drink some
competition grade, aged Wulong that priced into the hundreds-of-
dollars range today. I am not trying to brag or anything, I'm just
trying to make you understand how serious I take misrepresentation in
the tea industry and how dangerous it is.

You do realize that if you go out with anyone in the tea biz to a
restaurant here on the mainland what they will ask to drink: Bai Kai
Shui (boiled water). I wonder why that is?

Dong Ding currently is manufactured from Dong Ding Mountain in
Taiwan.
Tie Guan Yin comes from AnXi Fujian.

Anything else is forgery, fake, or misrepresentation. Why can you not
understand this?

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On May 6, 7:10 pm, Mydnight > wrote:
> > Ji pin actually means "supreme grade", but of course, everybody on
> > Earth sells Ji Pin tea....

>
> If it were "Gao Ji", I think that would mean more like high or supreme
> grade. The "Ji" in this way, I think, just means it's a higher grade
> than most teas.
>

Ji Pin, I can assure you, means supreme grade. For lack of a better
reference online, I refer you to this

http://www.yellowbridge.com/language...&search=Search

Pin in this case means a product, ji means supreme. Together it means
this tea is supreme grade. This is a compound most often used in
sales/advertising/product naming, but it's everywhere. For example,
Yichang Hao's flagship puerh has three grades -- Zhengpin, Jipin, and
Zhenpin, with Zhenpin being the highest. Zhengpin means roughly "Real/
proper grade". Jipin is "Supreme grade", and Zhenpin is "Precious
grade". You get the idea.

> > What do the teas look like?

>
> > The tea on the right, Gan Chun Wulong, just means "Sweet - mellow -
> > Wulong". It's just a name you give to something. With the presence
> > of the words Gan and Chun, however, there's a slight chance that this
> > is some sort of Ginseng Wulong. Hard to say, again, without seeing
> > the tea itself.

>
> I've never heard of any Wulong called that before.


This is going to be a product's trade name, rather than a wulong that
is actually called by that. So, somebody marketing a ginseng wulong
can be calling it by something like that. It can have no ginseng as
well, of course, but I was just making a wild guess given the
association/implications of the name.

MarshalN
http://www.xanga.com/MarshalN

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On May 7, 12:19 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> The Chinese as scam artists is getting thin. How do you know your so
> called Taiwanese teas aren't from some mainland front company on the
> island selling your friends doctored tea? Dong Ding is the only
> description I know that identifies the TKY exported to Taiwan way
> back. Dong Ding is the only Fujian description I know that looks like
> what is produced in Taiwan today. Nobody is trying to con anybody.
> It's a matter of getting the usage correct. When I buy Yunnan Silver
> Needles I know the difference from Fujian.
>
> Jim
>
> PS I want to mimic Taiwan teas. I'll doctor BenShan. That'll
> fool'em. I'll go you one better. Tea can't hide the taste of
> anything. You can hide the taste of tea.
>
> On May 6, 5:06 am, Mydnight > wrote:
>
>
>
> > On May 5, 10:32 pm, Space Cowboy > wrote:

>
> > > PS The only tea I've tasted from Fujian that tastes very close to
> > > Taiwan mtn teas is BenShan. In fact I will say I probably couldn't
> > > tell the two apart in a blind taste test.

>
> > The spooky thing about the mainland Wulongs is that you have no idea
> > what kinds of chemicals they add to their teas to make them taste that
> > way. There's no way to know what kind of tea you actually get,
> > anyway, unless you have friends in the business.- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -


The only way that it could be Dongding TGY is if it was a TGY varietal
grown in Dongding (a place in Taiwan). Dongding is the name of a
place, not a varietal. TGY is the name of a varietal, not a place.
There is TGY from Taiwan, but it's from Muzha, near Taipei, whereas
Dongding is in the middle of the island. If you took a varietal from
Dongding to Anxi and grew it there, it still wouldn't be Dongding TGY,
it would be Anxi luanze, or whatever varietal it was. Dongding TGY is
a contradiction in terms.

SN - can you post some pictures of each tea, both dry leaf and after
steeping?

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I'll try one more time. Each time I try a different angle that it is
more than geography. DongDing is a retroactive term used in Fujian
today. Here is just one of many discussions on SanZui which is the
Chinese forum equivalent of RFDT on the difference between Anxi and
Taiwan DongDing:

http://www.sanzui.com/bbs/archive/in...p/t-11588.html

The fact the differences can be semantic versus geographic varietal
doesn't preclude the use of the term. Note even the limited use of
TGY in the discussion. I agree with the one poster that the use for
the mainland means a lighter oxidation of Dong Ding TKY similar to
Taiwan.

Your tea arguments are simple dismissal of the Chinese ChaYe industry
as corrupt. I personally think you are drowning in a sea of tea
information overload. If I was fortunate as you, I would make better
use of the opportunity.

Jim

On May 7, 11:10 am, Mydnight > wrote:
> On May 8, 12:19 am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> Dong Ding currently is manufactured from Dong Ding Mountain in
> Taiwan.
> Tie Guan Yin comes from AnXi Fujian.
>
> Anything else is forgery, fake, or misrepresentation. Why can you not
> understand this?





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Default Request translation from chinese

dry "high mountain king of oolong"
http://img255.imageshack.us/my.php?i...nwhfdrynz3.jpg
no wet pic yet sorry, just got home.

dry "cold high top oolong"
http://img103.imageshack.us/my.php?i...longdrynr8.jpg

wet "cold high top oolong"
http://img258.imageshack.us/my.php?i...ngwhfdrgz3.jpg

while i tried to white-balance the picture, they may not be accurate
in color,
theyre also different zoom levels.

> SN - can you post some pictures of each tea, both dry leaf and after
> steeping?



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> while i tried to white-balance the picture, they may not be accurate
> in color,
> theyre also different zoom levels.


Your pics basically proves what I was saying above. I see roasted,
partially roasted, and "qing xiang" tea thrown in together. You see
that some of the nuggets are much darker compared with the rest of
them? Also, there are leaves and stems, which fall into the 2/3-leaf,
1 stem configuration, that looks like the Taiwanese tea while there
are also a bunch of nuggets that are stemless.

Grab bag of stuff. I would have no idea how to classify that tea.

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