Sushi (alt.food.sushi) For talking sushi. (Sashimi, wasabi, miso soup, and other elements of the sushi experience are valid topics.) Sushi is a broad topic; discussions range from preparation to methods of eating to favorite kinds to good restaurants.

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  #91 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:15 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Gerry" wrote in message
s...


In article , Musashi
wrote:



I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems


it


would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from


bamboo


pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.

Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.

I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.



I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.



Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.


This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?

--
Dan


  #92 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:15 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Gerry" wrote in message
s...


In article , Musashi
wrote:



I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems


it


would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from


bamboo


pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.

Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.

I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.



I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.



Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.


This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?

--
Dan

  #93 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:55 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Gerry" wrote in message
s...


In article , Musashi
wrote:



I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems


it


would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from


bamboo


pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.

Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.

I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.



I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.



Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.


This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?


Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634

Fish & Wildlife Service Issues Policy Enforcing
African Ivory Ban

Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan today announced the Interior
Department's U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's policy for enforcing the
June 9 ban on importation of African elephant ivory into the United
States.

Under the ban, it is illegal to import African elephant ivory from
any country. This ban covers commercial and non-commercial shipments
(including through the mail) of raw or worked (carved) ivory, including
antiques and items in personal accompanying baggage or household ef-
fects.

http://www.totse.com/en/politics/gre...et/ivory2.html




  #94 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:55 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Gerry" wrote in message
s...


In article , Musashi
wrote:



I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems


it


would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from


bamboo


pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.

Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.

I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.



I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.



Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.


This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?


Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634

Fish & Wildlife Service Issues Policy Enforcing
African Ivory Ban

Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan today announced the Interior
Department's U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's policy for enforcing the
June 9 ban on importation of African elephant ivory into the United
States.

Under the ban, it is illegal to import African elephant ivory from
any country. This ban covers commercial and non-commercial shipments
(including through the mail) of raw or worked (carved) ivory, including
antiques and items in personal accompanying baggage or household ef-
fects.

http://www.totse.com/en/politics/gre...et/ivory2.html




  #95 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:55 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Gerry" wrote in message
s...


In article , Musashi
wrote:



I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems


it


would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from


bamboo


pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.

Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.

I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.



I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.



Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.


This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?


Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634

Fish & Wildlife Service Issues Policy Enforcing
African Ivory Ban

Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan today announced the Interior
Department's U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's policy for enforcing the
June 9 ban on importation of African elephant ivory into the United
States.

Under the ban, it is illegal to import African elephant ivory from
any country. This ban covers commercial and non-commercial shipments
(including through the mail) of raw or worked (carved) ivory, including
antiques and items in personal accompanying baggage or household ef-
fects.

http://www.totse.com/en/politics/gre...et/ivory2.html






  #96 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:16 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...


Musashi wrote:



"Gerry" wrote in message
cks...



In article , Musashi
wrote:




I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems



it



would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from



bamboo



pulp?



Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.



Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...




After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the

chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was


wrong.


Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.

I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.


Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.


My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.

They did a good job getting it past US Customs.

This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?



Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634


They got them way before the ban, early 80's.

--
Dan

  #97 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:16 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...


Musashi wrote:



"Gerry" wrote in message
cks...



In article , Musashi
wrote:




I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems



it



would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from



bamboo



pulp?



Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.



Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...




After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the

chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was


wrong.


Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.

I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.


Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.


My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.

They did a good job getting it past US Customs.

This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?



Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634


They got them way before the ban, early 80's.

--
Dan

  #98 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:23 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...


Musashi wrote:



"Gerry" wrote in message
cks...



In article , Musashi
wrote:




I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo.

Seems



it



would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from



bamboo



pulp?



Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical

strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.



Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...




After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the

chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was


wrong.


Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair

of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I

was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.

I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.


Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.


My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from

some
Japanese students.

They did a good job getting it past US Customs.

This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?



Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634


They got them way before the ban, early 80's.


Very good.
I have a hawkbill turtle shell from the Bahamas somewhere in the basement
that I got in 1983.




  #99 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:23 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

Musashi wrote:


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...


Musashi wrote:



"Gerry" wrote in message
cks...



In article , Musashi
wrote:




I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo.

Seems



it



would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from



bamboo



pulp?



Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical

strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.



Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...




After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all

the

chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was


wrong.


Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair

of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I

was
told they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped.

I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.


Yes. I jokingly told me friend before he left for his Asia trip to
bring me back a pair of jewel encrusted chopsticks. He brought back
two set of jade, but was told they shouldn't be used.


My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from

some
Japanese students.

They did a good job getting it past US Customs.

This was a long time ago. When did the ban on ivory go into
effect?



Fish and Wildlife Service
For Release June 27, 1989
Patricia Fisher 202-343-5634
Elizabeth Lipscomb 202-343-5634


They got them way before the ban, early 80's.


Very good.
I have a hawkbill turtle shell from the Bahamas somewhere in the basement
that I got in 1983.




  #100 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:31 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Gerry wrote in message ...
In article [email protected], F t B
wrote:

Fort Nelson BC is home to the worlds largest chopstick factory. They pump
out 7.5 million a day or almost 2 billion a year. They use aspen which grows
like a weed up there.


Bingo. Thanks for the data!




Aspen. I had thought that the disposables were all made of bamboo.



ww


  #101 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:31 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Gerry wrote in message ...
In article [email protected], F t B
wrote:

Fort Nelson BC is home to the worlds largest chopstick factory. They pump
out 7.5 million a day or almost 2 billion a year. They use aspen which grows
like a weed up there.


Bingo. Thanks for the data!




Aspen. I had thought that the disposables were all made of bamboo.



ww
  #102 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:35 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default


There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese restaurants.
The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and is cut so that
there are 4 sides.
This is the type where sometimes one screws up and they break unevenly
requiring
a stealthy stretch over the the empty table next to you to grab another set.
(see top- white birch waribashi)
The other kind is bamboo. Although square at the top where the two
hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks are each circular and are
tapered at the end.
This type is also fairly common especially in the better Japanese
resaurants.
(See second from top)
Some Bamboo chopsticks are not rounded and cut square.
(See last two examples at bottom)

http://www.beeluck.co.jp/HZ.event/KH...n/waribasi.htm




Oh, I see. Thanks for the explanation.


ww
  #103 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:35 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default


There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese restaurants.
The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and is cut so that
there are 4 sides.
This is the type where sometimes one screws up and they break unevenly
requiring
a stealthy stretch over the the empty table next to you to grab another set.
(see top- white birch waribashi)
The other kind is bamboo. Although square at the top where the two
hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks are each circular and are
tapered at the end.
This type is also fairly common especially in the better Japanese
resaurants.
(See second from top)
Some Bamboo chopsticks are not rounded and cut square.
(See last two examples at bottom)

http://www.beeluck.co.jp/HZ.event/KH...n/waribasi.htm




Oh, I see. Thanks for the explanation.


ww
  #104 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:35 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default


There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese restaurants.
The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and is cut so that
there are 4 sides.
This is the type where sometimes one screws up and they break unevenly
requiring
a stealthy stretch over the the empty table next to you to grab another set.
(see top- white birch waribashi)
The other kind is bamboo. Although square at the top where the two
hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks are each circular and are
tapered at the end.
This type is also fairly common especially in the better Japanese
resaurants.
(See second from top)
Some Bamboo chopsticks are not rounded and cut square.
(See last two examples at bottom)

http://www.beeluck.co.jp/HZ.event/KH...n/waribasi.htm




Oh, I see. Thanks for the explanation.


ww
  #105 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 05:35 PM
werewolf
 
Posts: n/a
Default


There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese restaurants.
The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and is cut so that
there are 4 sides.
This is the type where sometimes one screws up and they break unevenly
requiring
a stealthy stretch over the the empty table next to you to grab another set.
(see top- white birch waribashi)
The other kind is bamboo. Although square at the top where the two
hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks are each circular and are
tapered at the end.
This type is also fairly common especially in the better Japanese
resaurants.
(See second from top)
Some Bamboo chopsticks are not rounded and cut square.
(See last two examples at bottom)

http://www.beeluck.co.jp/HZ.event/KH...n/waribasi.htm




Oh, I see. Thanks for the explanation.


ww


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