Sushi (alt.food.sushi) For talking sushi. (Sashimi, wasabi, miso soup, and other elements of the sushi experience are valid topics.) Sushi is a broad topic; discussions range from preparation to methods of eating to favorite kinds to good restaurants.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Red Snapper
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)

> well Richmond is a lot more asian, ya know. I've been to maybe 8 places in
> Vancouver and I've never been offered a choice, I always end up with the rice
> on the outside, and, depending on whether it's an establishment that likes
> mayonaise, I get that too unless I tell them not to put it in. I didn't know I
> could tell them not to put the rice on the outside. I don't want anyone
> spitting in my sushi


Most of the places I go to have "short" menus = sushi checklists with no
descriptions, just names but they ALSO have big menus with descriptions
of the local fare, sometimes even with pictures on the menus and almost
always on standard placards with Kirin or Asahi or other advertising on
the tables. Is there ANY table menu or Kirin placard that does NOT have
a picture of standard (nori on the outside) tekka maki? I think it would be
a collector's item due to its rarity.

Menu descriptions that I've seen usually say "inside out roll with ..." implying
that it's opposite of the usual way. And if I didn't know what "inside out"
was referring to, I'd ask the waitstaff, host or sushi chef. Novelty sushi
(spider roll, fashion maki, B52 maki, ...) almost always have a description.

I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass food
displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.

I don't like it when someone spits in my sushi, either. It's even worse at
some of the other ethnic restaurants where they pee in the wine, a quaint
tradition but not to my liking.






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  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Red Snapper
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)

> well Richmond is a lot more asian, ya know. I've been to maybe 8 places in
> Vancouver and I've never been offered a choice, I always end up with the rice
> on the outside, and, depending on whether it's an establishment that likes
> mayonaise, I get that too unless I tell them not to put it in. I didn't know I
> could tell them not to put the rice on the outside. I don't want anyone
> spitting in my sushi


Most of the places I go to have "short" menus = sushi checklists with no
descriptions, just names but they ALSO have big menus with descriptions
of the local fare, sometimes even with pictures on the menus and almost
always on standard placards with Kirin or Asahi or other advertising on
the tables. Is there ANY table menu or Kirin placard that does NOT have
a picture of standard (nori on the outside) tekka maki? I think it would be
a collector's item due to its rarity.

Menu descriptions that I've seen usually say "inside out roll with ..." implying
that it's opposite of the usual way. And if I didn't know what "inside out"
was referring to, I'd ask the waitstaff, host or sushi chef. Novelty sushi
(spider roll, fashion maki, B52 maki, ...) almost always have a description.

I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass food
displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.

I don't like it when someone spits in my sushi, either. It's even worse at
some of the other ethnic restaurants where they pee in the wine, a quaint
tradition but not to my liking.






--
Sent by xanadoog from yahoo in field com
This is a spam protected message. Please answer with reference header.
Posted via http://www.usenet-replayer.com
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Michael
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Red Snapper" > wrote in message
du...
> I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass

food
> displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
> people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.


Hadn't been for the fake food in the display case I would have starved my
first few trips to Japan. I would just smile, crook my finger at the
waitress, walk to the display (usually this meant going outside), pointing
at what I wanted, returning to my seat and then saying "Beeru" with my hands
indicating a large one (now I know I should have said "beeru, jockey").


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Michael
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Red Snapper" > wrote in message
du...
> I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass

food
> displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
> people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.


Hadn't been for the fake food in the display case I would have starved my
first few trips to Japan. I would just smile, crook my finger at the
waitress, walk to the display (usually this meant going outside), pointing
at what I wanted, returning to my seat and then saying "Beeru" with my hands
indicating a large one (now I know I should have said "beeru, jockey").


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Musashi
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Red Snapper" > wrote in message
du...
<snip>

> I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass

food
> displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
> people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.
>


That is absolutely true. In the late 1800s when the Shogunate was abolished
and
Emperor Meiji was restored to the throne, Japan opened up to massive
cultural
importation from the west. Western foods was one of them, and in order for
the
average Japanese person who had little knowledge of Western foods to decide
what they'd want to try, restaurants started using models of the "exotic"
food
placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the practice began.





  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Musashi
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Red Snapper" > wrote in message
du...
<snip>

> I don't know if it's true, but one of the reasons for all the fiberglass

food
> displays in restaurants in Japan and Japanese restaurants in the US is so
> people can order by pointing: I'd like THAT.
>


That is absolutely true. In the late 1800s when the Shogunate was abolished
and
Emperor Meiji was restored to the throne, Japan opened up to massive
cultural
importation from the west. Western foods was one of them, and in order for
the
average Japanese person who had little knowledge of Western foods to decide
what they'd want to try, restaurants started using models of the "exotic"
food
placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the practice began.



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ken Blake
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)

In m,
Musashi > typed:

> In the late 1800s when the Shogunate was
> abolished and
> Emperor Meiji was restored to the throne, Japan opened up to

massive
> cultural
> importation from the west. Western foods was one of them, and

in
> order for the
> average Japanese person who had little knowledge of Western

foods to
> decide what they'd want to try, restaurants started using

models of
> the "exotic" food
> placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the

practice
> began.



Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
have the plastics that are used now.

--
Ken Blake
Please reply to the newsgroup


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Musashi
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Ken Blake" > wrote in message
...
> In m,
> Musashi > typed:
>
> > In the late 1800s when the Shogunate was
> > abolished and
> > Emperor Meiji was restored to the throne, Japan opened up to

> massive
> > cultural
> > importation from the west. Western foods was one of them, and

> in
> > order for the
> > average Japanese person who had little knowledge of Western

> foods to
> > decide what they'd want to try, restaurants started using

> models of
> > the "exotic" food
> > placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the

> practice
> > began.

>
>
> Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
> have the plastics that are used now.
>


I really don't know for sure.
Today's food displays are made of plastic.
I believe those around post war 1945 would have been wax.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Musashi
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Ken Blake" > wrote in message
...
> In m,
> Musashi > typed:
>
> > In the late 1800s when the Shogunate was
> > abolished and
> > Emperor Meiji was restored to the throne, Japan opened up to

> massive
> > cultural
> > importation from the west. Western foods was one of them, and

> in
> > order for the
> > average Japanese person who had little knowledge of Western

> foods to
> > decide what they'd want to try, restaurants started using

> models of
> > the "exotic" food
> > placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the

> practice
> > began.

>
>
> Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
> have the plastics that are used now.
>


I really don't know for sure.
Today's food displays are made of plastic.
I believe those around post war 1945 would have been wax.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Logcher
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)

Ken Blake wrote:

>
>>the "exotic" food
>>placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the
>>practice began.

>
> Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
> have the plastics that are used now.


Balsa wood.

--
Dan



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dan Logcher
 
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Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)

Ken Blake wrote:

>
>>the "exotic" food
>>placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the
>>practice began.

>
> Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
> have the plastics that are used now.


Balsa wood.

--
Dan

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default ISO: AYCE Japanese Restaurants (Vancouver)


"Dan Logcher" > wrote in message
...
> Ken Blake wrote:
>
> >
> >>the "exotic" food
> >>placed outside to draw in customers. This was where the
> >>practice began.

> >
> > Interesting! What did thy make it from in those days? They didn't
> > have the plastics that are used now.

>
> Balsa wood.
>

That makes sense.


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