Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 14-08-2006, 08:39 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default Hour "sour" sourdough do you prefer ?

Dining at a nice restaurant in Oslo on my wife's 27'th birthday, we
were served bread in between courses The restaurant baked some bread
"in house", and bought some from the only artisan bakery in oslo. I was
naturally excited and curious abot the bread, and worked my through a
large variety like brioche, nut bread, rasin/cinnamon etc.

When the turn came to sourdough, I was a bit dissapointed. I wasn't
expecting a "pickle".
Almost a bit like "Danish rye". I usually bake my SD so that you can
easily recognize the distinct smell and aroma on the second or third
chew. This slice smelled sour, and the odour was in your mouth the
minute you opened it.

I guess this is a question of personal preferences, but how "sour" do
you other guys and girls bake your SD bread? Do you do differently on
Fine vs. Wholegrain for example?


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Old 15-08-2006, 11:31 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default Hour "sour" sourdough do you prefer ?


Glenn wrote:
Dining at a nice restaurant in Oslo on my wife's 27'th birthday, we
were served bread in between courses The restaurant baked some bread
"in house", and bought some from the only artisan bakery in oslo. I was
naturally excited and curious abot the bread, and worked my through a
large variety like brioche, nut bread, rasin/cinnamon etc.

When the turn came to sourdough, I was a bit dissapointed. I wasn't
expecting a "pickle".
Almost a bit like "Danish rye". I usually bake my SD so that you can
easily recognize the distinct smell and aroma on the second or third
chew. This slice smelled sour, and the odour was in your mouth the
minute you opened it.

I guess this is a question of personal preferences, but how "sour" do
you other guys and girls bake your SD bread? Do you do differently on
Fine vs. Wholegrain for example?


H Glenn,

I like my bread to have good all-round-flavour. But I don't expect
bread to taste sour. I think natural leaven is what it's all about. If
it's too sour it's invasive. Bread, for me is a kind of support for
other stuff. I really can't help thinking that the expectation of sour
comes from the term "Sourdough". I know that sounds dismissive, and it
really is a case of just personal taste. But since that is such a
dynamic thing to even discuss it seems daft. But don't take any notice
of me it's just my opinion. No more valid than someone else who says
they like their bread to taste like cheese. You guys don't have
Lancashire Cheese do you? It's wonderful. Its got a real tang. I have
occasionally made bread that sour. Nice with cheese but not much else.
: -)

TG born in Lancashire.



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