Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 01-04-2005, 07:47 PM
Roy
 
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Hey, Roy, how long would you recommend soaking the cracked wheat

before
kneading it in?


Ola Gonorio ( el mucho)Dinerig?
I have already stated it in my previous posts; please try to review it.

How do you account for the moisture of the hydrated
cracked wheat in the water requirement of the recipe?


A baker need not worry being precise in quantifying the amount of
water in the soaked grain in the same way an accountant does in
balancing his books to be accurate to a cent.g
Here ....Its just based on pure commonsense......And also unsoaked
grains present in the bread is hard for the teeth to chew and can
help abrade the tooth enamel.
You do not soak the grain and just add it to the dough then you, then
you will end up with a dough that dries faster due to moisture
migration (from the dough to the seeds); but if you pre soak the
grains then the so called moisture transfer will be minimized (if
not prevented).

Bill, Samartha has commented that bread starts going stale as soon as

you
remove it from the oven.


That is what every freshly baked bread does following the
thermodynamic law or entropyg.There are no exceptions.
Therefore the only possible way the baker does, is to slow the staling
process by producing a moist and good textured bread..

A properly baked multi grain bread made from a dough with presoaked
grains stays moist longer than a similar bread dough that uses the
grains without being prehydrated.
Going back to the original issue....
The problem here is that the original poster question is how comes his
bread (appear to ) feel and taste stale after a few hours when others
don't.
Therefore its not actually stale but drier in texture which can be
comparable to a stale bread.
Therefore I suggest a means to improve its texture.
Ciao

Roy


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Old 01-04-2005, 07:59 PM
Gonorio Dineri
 
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"Roy" wrote in news:1112381274.728036.118180
@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:


Hey, Roy, how long would you recommend soaking the cracked wheat

before
kneading it in?


Ola Gonorio ( el mucho)Dinerig?


Ole'. Dineri? Va bene.


The problem here is that the original poster question is how comes his
bread (appear to ) feel and taste stale after a few hours when others
don't.
Therefore its not actually stale but drier in texture which can be
comparable to a stale bread.
Therefore I suggest a means to improve its texture.
Ciao

Roy



Thanks. I often put raw sunflower seeds in my dough because my bride likes
it that way. I've never soaked them, and it is obvious that they do indeed
leech moisture from the dough, for they are never crunchy. But the dough
isn't excessively dry. I conclude from that that the sunflower seeds are
already moist. Well, the raw seeds present no resistance when I bite into
them, I might crack a tooth biting into a dry wheat berry because they are
both dry and hard. So, I see your point. I'm guessing an overnight soak
of cracked wheat would do the trick. And, I;ll still have my teeth after
munching a loaf.

Ciao, Bello.

Gonorio
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Old 01-04-2005, 08:46 PM
Roy
 
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Hmmn its okay for the grains to have an overnight soak. before usimg
it on the dough..
Caio

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Old 01-04-2005, 10:33 PM
Repeating Rifle
 
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in article , Gonorio Dineri at
wrote on 4/1/05 9:22 AM:

Hey, Roy, how long would you recommend soaking the cracked wheat before
kneading it in? How do you account for the moisture of the hydrated
cracked wheat in the water requirement of the recipe?

Bill, Samartha has commented that bread starts going stale as soon as you
remove it from the oven. Well, maybe it starts as soon as it cools.

I've found it wise to seal any extra loaves in heavy plastic as soon as
they're cool and pop them in the freezer. I've done the same with half a
loaf when I know I won't polish off the full loaf in a day or two.

Freezing the bread is an excellent strategy for people who like to bake a
week or two's bread, or who travel. When you're away from home and
yearning for a bite of sourdough bread, you can have the wife Fed-Ex you
a loaf. It's a tad expensive, but when money is no object...


I just baked another sourdough bread using the same technique. It rose most
of the way overnight. I gave the dough more time in a warmed over oven. All
in all, I estimate an increase of the volume to be a factor of four.

Part of what I like about my bread is the crunchyness of the seeds and
cracked grain that I add. Would soaking these additions cause the crunchies
to dissappear? Even if the bread does go downhill somewhat, a little bit of
toasting makes it almost new again. And by the time toasting does not help,
the bread is mostly gone.

Bill



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