Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 19-10-2014, 05:59 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

Hi all.

How can I rescue my starter? I think has gone bad.

Best

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Old 19-10-2014, 06:02 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

On 19/10/2014 10:59 AM, wrote:
Hi all.

How can I rescue my starter? I think has gone bad.

Best

In what way has it "gone bad"?
Graham
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Old 19-10-2014, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

On Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:32:51 PM UTC-4:30, graham wrote:
On 19/10/2014 10:59 AM, wrote:

Hi all.




How can I rescue my starter? I think has gone bad.




Best




In what way has it "gone bad"?

Graham


It doesn't double nor bubbles up. It becomes almost liquid and elastic and it doesn't smell like it used to.
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Old 19-10-2014, 09:08 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad



I've had occasion to think that mine has died but after discarding most

of it, after 2-3 feedings, it has revived. I keep mine at ~60% hydration

and sometimes leave it for 2 months before feeding it. The first feeding

then might be a bit sluggish but the second is usually vigorous.

It wouldn't take too long to start a new one. While you are building up

the strength, add the discarded part to a yeast-raised dough to add flavour.

Graham


Hi,

Thanks for replying

I've already completed three feedings and still no activity.

Cheers from Venezuela.

A.-


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Old 19-10-2014, 10:34 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

On 19/10/2014 2:08 PM, Andrés Hidalgo Acuña wrote:


I've had occasion to think that mine has died but after discarding most

of it, after 2-3 feedings, it has revived. I keep mine at ~60% hydration

and sometimes leave it for 2 months before feeding it. The first feeding

then might be a bit sluggish but the second is usually vigorous.

It wouldn't take too long to start a new one. While you are building up

the strength, add the discarded part to a yeast-raised dough to add flavour.

Graham


Hi,

Thanks for replying

I've already completed three feedings and still no activity.

Cheers from Venezuela.

A.-

Then I think you must start again. Use whole-wheat flour with a little
rye flour to start with and then feed with white. Alternatively, send
for this, although it might be awkward for you in Venezuela:

http://carlsfriends.net/


Graham (in Canada)
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Old 20-10-2014, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

On Sunday, October 19, 2014 5:34:20 PM UTC-4, graham wrote:
On 19/10/2014 2:08 PM, Andr�s Hidalgo Acu�a wrote:





I've had occasion to think that mine has died but after discarding most




of it, after 2-3 feedings, it has revived. I keep mine at ~60% hydration




and sometimes leave it for 2 months before feeding it. The first feeding




then might be a bit sluggish but the second is usually vigorous.




It wouldn't take too long to start a new one. While you are building up




the strength, add the discarded part to a yeast-raised dough to add flavour.




Graham




Hi,




Thanks for replying




I've already completed three feedings and still no activity.




Cheers from Venezuela.




A.-




Then I think you must start again. Use whole-wheat flour with a little

rye flour to start with and then feed with white. Alternatively, send

for this, although it might be awkward for you in Venezuela:



http://carlsfriends.net/





Graham (in Canada)


You might want to try waiting a little longer between feedings, and/or discard almost all the old starter and feed with lots of new flour and warm water and leave it alone for a little longer (at 75-80 degreesF). Also, no activity is rare if you're leaving it out with a cloth covering it--you want air to pass through, but not bugs or dirt. Something will cause activity, either the inherent starter culture or the wild yeast in the environment (all sourdough starters take on the culture of their environment). So maybe leave it for a while. If still nothing, then I'd wonder about the water you're using--is it heavily chlorinated? That might be killing the natural yeast. Try filtered water if you're not sure.

I keep my starter in a straight-sided tall glass jar and after I feed it, I put a rubber band around the jar at the level of the culture to remind myself where it was. Then I can see later that it has or hasn't risen--if I'm lucky I catch it when it's above the level of the band, or else there are remnants of when the culture had been there earlier in the day. Sometimes we just don't see it at its high point!

Suerte!
Rachel (USA)
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Old 22-10-2014, 02:49 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default How do I know my starter is bad

On Sun, 19 Oct 2014 09:59:31 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

Hi all.


from Venezuela

How can I rescue my starter? I think has gone bad.


I'm from Brazil, which has a similar climate. I've left my
starter in the fridge for almost 6 months, and 2-3 re-seeding later
it's recovered. It's been going since 2002. Or thereabouts.
One teaspoon of the old starter to a cup of water and a cup of
flour. Mix well, leave out of the fridge in a glass jar with a loose
plastic cover for a day or two. Mix it at least twice a day. I use a
wooden "churrasco" stick to mix it.
One big problem we have here is the water, it's high in
chlorine because of all the germs. Levels are much higher in summer.
Are you using mineral/dechlorinated or tap water ?
If you have lost it, a new batch only takes around 10 days to
produce. Assuming ambient temperatures of 30 - 35 centigrade.
2-3 days to produce first bubbles - reseed
2-3 days with that horrible baby-puke smell - reseed
After that let it climb up the jar and re-seed it when it
starts to fall back on itself. When it smells fruity it's ready.
[]'s

Or you can try this guy's recipe:

Starter:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ou6_MkIvKOo

Bread:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hc-BSDmgZwE

(In Portuguese)
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012


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