Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 20-11-2011, 08:47 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default "Sour" starter

I contacted one of the best chefs I ever worked with, to tell me how
to get a "sour" starter. He is German, but he now works at a four
star hotel in India as the executive chef. His name is Willy Hauter;
he is a specialist in breads, and spun sugar decoration. Give him the
credit, not me.

This was his reply:

Okay, this Is the procedure. You start with simple dough.

450 G. BAKING FLOUR
225 G. BEER (use German wheat, naturally fermented like An Endanger
Weiss bier
mix this and cover with a wet towel.

Keep it for 24 hours,
day 2, cut the dough in half and throw it out, and replace it with :
225 G. BAKING FLOUR
112 G. BEER
Continue procedure for 10 to 12 days

After 10-14 days, depending on the area, weather etc. your sour should
be fermenting nicely.
Make sure you cover it for the first 5 days with a wet towel,
afterwards, with plastic.

When finished, after measuring sour, use sourdough calculator to get
flour, salt,etc.
(this calculator is available at: samartha.net)

Work this dough well with your hands; Do not use a kitchenette or
other small machine as it will destroy the gluten with the sour.
Once you have the dough smooth, bench proof it for about an hour.
Then cut it in half, take one half and place it in a bowl. Add 250
GR.WATER, cover with plastic foil and place this in the fridge. This
will be your daily sour.
You will always use the same recipe; 500gr.HIGH GLUTEN FLOUR AND 250
gr.. WATER, 20 GR. SALT. ALWAYS use HALF IN THE FRIDGE AND WITH THE
OTHER HALF YOU WILL BE MAKING THE BREAD.
This recipe will give you one nice loaf of bread. Mold the bread in
long shape, like half of a French bread size.
Place this on an oiled pan, cover with a plastic, and place in the
fridge overnight. The next day bake it and enjoy. The bread will get
better and better.

1 pound = 453.59237 grams

Maj6th



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Old 20-11-2011, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 26
Default "Sour" starter

On 11/20/11 2:47 PM, Mr Maj6th wrote:
I contacted one of the best chefs I ever worked with, to tell me how
to get a "sour" starter. He is German, but he now works at a four
star hotel in India as the executive chef. His name is Willy Hauter;
he is a specialist in breads, and spun sugar decoration. Give him the
credit, not me.

This was his reply:

Okay, this Is the procedure. You start with simple dough.

450 G. BAKING FLOUR
225 G. BEER (use German wheat, naturally fermented like An Endanger
Weiss bier
mix this and cover with a wet towel.

Keep it for 24 hours,
day 2, cut the dough in half and throw it out, and replace it with :
225 G. BAKING FLOUR
112 G. BEER
Continue procedure for 10 to 12 days


I think the phrase he's looking for instead of "naturally fermented" is
"bottle conditioned". It doesn't matter how natural the fermentation
process is if all the yeast is killed before the final product is
bottled. This procedure depends on viable yeast remaining in the bottle
and that is rare in today's beer world (but not unheard of). Actually,
a more straightforward way to obtain brewer's yeast would be to simply
buy brewer's yeast rather than a hit-and-miss procedure based on trace
yeast left in a commercial bottle of beer.

There are two ways I could interpret "continue procedure".

1. Halve the amount of flour and beer each time. Day three would get
112 grams of flour and 56 grams of beer. (Odd to use a unit of weight
to measure a liquid.)

2. Continue with 225 grams of flour and 112 grams of beer for 10-12 days.
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Old 19-12-2016, 04:57 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default "Sour" starter

On Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 10:47:05 PM UTC+2, Mr Maj6th wrote:
I contacted one of the best chefs I ever worked with, to tell me how
to get a "sour" starter. He is German, but he now works at a four
star hotel in India as the executive chef. His name is Willy Hauter;
he is a specialist in breads, and spun sugar decoration. Give him the
credit, not me.

This was his reply:

Okay, this Is the procedure. You start with simple dough.

450 G. BAKING FLOUR
225 G. BEER (use German wheat, naturally fermented like An Endanger
Weiss bier
mix this and cover with a wet towel.

Keep it for 24 hours,
day 2, cut the dough in half and throw it out, and replace it with :
225 G. BAKING FLOUR
112 G. BEER
Continue procedure for 10 to 12 days

After 10-14 days, depending on the area, weather etc. your sour should
be fermenting nicely.
Make sure you cover it for the first 5 days with a wet towel,
afterwards, with plastic.

When finished, after measuring sour, use sourdough calculator to get
flour, salt,etc.
(this calculator is available at: samartha.net)

Work this dough well with your hands; Do not use a kitchenette or
other small machine as it will destroy the gluten with the sour.
Once you have the dough smooth, bench proof it for about an hour.
Then cut it in half, take one half and place it in a bowl. Add 250
GR.WATER, cover with plastic foil and place this in the fridge. This
will be your daily sour.
You will always use the same recipe; 500gr.HIGH GLUTEN FLOUR AND 250
gr.. WATER, 20 GR. SALT. ALWAYS use HALF IN THE FRIDGE AND WITH THE
OTHER HALF YOU WILL BE MAKING THE BREAD.
This recipe will give you one nice loaf of bread. Mold the bread in
long shape, like half of a French bread size.
Place this on an oiled pan, cover with a plastic, and place in the
fridge overnight. The next day bake it and enjoy. The bread will get
better and better.

1 pound = 453.59237 grams

Maj6th


Samantha.net seems to no longer exist. I am very interested in this German Beer Starter recipe but do not know how to calculate the sourness and for what reason I am calculating it. If anyone could advise I would be very grateful.
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Old 19-12-2016, 12:58 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 80
Default "Sour" starter

On Sun, 18 Dec 2016 20:57:48 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 10:47:05 PM UTC+2, Mr Maj6th wrote:
I contacted one of the best chefs I ever worked with, to tell me how
to get a "sour" starter. He is German, but he now works at a four
star hotel in India as the executive chef. His name is Willy Hauter;
he is a specialist in breads, and spun sugar decoration. Give him the
credit, not me.


Hum --- over 5 years old. A mere blink if you consider how
long sourdough has been around.
This was his reply:

Okay, this Is the procedure. You start with simple dough.

450 G. BAKING FLOUR
225 G. BEER (use German wheat, naturally fermented like An Endanger
Weiss bier
mix this and cover with a wet towel.

Keep it for 24 hours,
day 2, cut the dough in half and throw it out, and replace it with :
225 G. BAKING FLOUR
112 G. BEER
Continue procedure for 10 to 12 days

After 10-14 days, depending on the area, weather etc. your sour should
be fermenting nicely.
Make sure you cover it for the first 5 days with a wet towel,
afterwards, with plastic.

When finished, after measuring sour, use sourdough calculator to get
flour, salt,etc.
(this calculator is available at: samartha.net)

Work this dough well with your hands; Do not use a kitchenette or
other small machine as it will destroy the gluten with the sour.
Once you have the dough smooth, bench proof it for about an hour.
Then cut it in half, take one half and place it in a bowl. Add 250
GR.WATER, cover with plastic foil and place this in the fridge. This
will be your daily sour.
You will always use the same recipe; 500gr.HIGH GLUTEN FLOUR AND 250
gr.. WATER, 20 GR. SALT. ALWAYS use HALF IN THE FRIDGE AND WITH THE
OTHER HALF YOU WILL BE MAKING THE BREAD.
This recipe will give you one nice loaf of bread. Mold the bread in
long shape, like half of a French bread size.
Place this on an oiled pan, cover with a plastic, and place in the
fridge overnight. The next day bake it and enjoy. The bread will get
better and better.

1 pound = 453.59237 grams

Maj6th


Samantha.net seems to no longer exist. I am very interested in this German Beer Starter recipe but do not know how to calculate the sourness and for what reason I am calculating it. If anyone could advise I would be very grateful.


It exists.

canonical name samartha.net
address 161.97.219.38

Creation Date: 06-jan-2001
Expiration Date: 06-jan-2018

Let's hope he's just updating the site.

Meanwhile, use wayback

https://web.archive.org/web/*/samartha.net

As to the starter, just taste the hooch (the liquid that forms
on top), or add a few drops to bicarbonate. It should froth.
I'd forget the beer recipe. Any sourdough starter become as
sour as it can, then the acidity starts killing off the microbes, so
they become dormant. It kills the non-sourdough microbes first, which
is why you allow a starter to become dormant to "clean" it.
IOW, all real sourdough starters ARE sour.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
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Old 20-12-2016, 03:27 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 10
Default "Sour" starter

Awesome site.

You'll do the 225 / 112 forever. Generally you want enough you can bake with, but not too much as if you don't bake you have to toss it. Seems like a lot of beer to throw at a starter, but I guess the yeast must be good.


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Old 21-12-2016, 01:48 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 80
Default "Sour" starter

On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 19:27:41 -0800 (PST), Robert Zaleski
wrote:

Awesome site.

You'll do the 225 / 112 forever. Generally you want enough you can bake with,
but not too much as if you don't bake you have to toss it. Seems like a lot of
beer to throw at a starter, but I guess the yeast must be good.


I have no idea what site you are referring to. Please share.
TIA
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
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Old 22-12-2016, 01:41 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10
Default "Sour" starter


The samartha.net was what I was referring to that was mentioned above. You have to use https://web.archive.org/web/*/samartha.net to see.
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Old 22-12-2016, 03:00 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Posts: 80
Default "Sour" starter

On Wed, 21 Dec 2016 17:41:44 -0800 (PST), Robert Zaleski
wrote:


The samartha.net was what I was referring to that was mentioned above.
You have to use https://web.archive.org/web/*/samartha.net to see.


Oh, YW.
I posted that.
Please include the message you are replying to, with quotes,
it's the norm in Usenet. A decent client will do that automatically.
Use Forte Agent (I think version 3.3 is still freeware) or
Thunderbird (cross-platform).
Free "anonymous" news server:
http://news.aioe.org/index.php?id=quickstart-guide
HTH
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012


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