Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-08-2008, 09:53 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1
Default Mesquite flour starter

Has anyone started a wild yeast starter using mesquite flour? I'm
giving it a shot for the heck of it. I'm adding about a cup of all
purpose flour to a few tablespoons of mesquite flour because I don't
think the mesquite flour has much in the way of sugar and starch. I
assume that mesquite pods must have some yeast on them, so would that
be the type of yeast that will also work for bread? And if so, will
it affect the taste at all?

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 04:03 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
Sam Sam is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 218
Default Mesquite flour starter

wrote:
Has anyone started a wild yeast starter using mesquite flour? I'm
giving it a shot for the heck of it. I'm adding about a cup of all
purpose flour to a few tablespoons of mesquite flour because I don't
think the mesquite flour has much in the way of sugar and starch. I
assume that mesquite pods must have some yeast on them, so would that
be the type of yeast that will also work for bread? And if so, will
it affect the taste at all?

I don't know why some people "here" are mostly yeast oriented?

It's half the story - actually less than that under some perspectives.

And - if you mix a cup of flour and a few TB's together, what do you
think the ratios of critters is?
Even by assuming the same germ count/gram on both, what do you think
will prevail?

Chances are that the mesquite flour may be less "fertile" - thinking on
that environment - desert and very dry.

As for sugar and starches in mesquite flour - look at the bottom of this
page:

http://www.desertusa.com/mag06/may/mesquite.html

- it's sweet.

and the

http://www.desertusa.com/web_cart/db/pages/9105.html

plenty of sugar and "carbohydrates" - probably starches if sugars are
listed separately.

So - if you want to play with SD from mesquite flour - take it pure, get
it going until it's sour and then port it over to wheat flour.

If something sour grows from it before going putrid.

Sam


_______________________________________________
Rec.food.sourdough mailing list

http://www.mountainbitwarrior.com/ma...food.sourdough



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 12:13 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 325
Default Mesquite flour starter

I have to agree with Sam,

if you want a flock of sheep why buy cows or in your case a couple of
sheep and a herd of cows? The best you'll get is cows and a few sheep
but unlike a farmer you won't be able to do a head count. You wouldn't
have a clue what thrived making your experiment meaningless.

Jim

On 4 Aug, 21:53, wrote:
Has anyone started a wild yeast starter using mesquite flour? *I'm
giving it a shot for the heck of it. *I'm adding about a cup of all
purpose flour to a few tablespoons of mesquite flour because I don't
think the mesquite flour has much in the way of sugar and starch. *I
assume that mesquite pods must have some yeast on them, so would that
be the type of yeast that will also work for bread? *And if so, will
it affect the taste at all?


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 04:35 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 441
Default Mesquite flour starter

On Aug 4, 3:53 pm, wrote:
... I'm adding about a cup of all
purpose flour to a few tablespoons of mesquite flour because I don't
think the mesquite flour has much in the way of sugar and starch.


You won't know until you try. But try with Mesquite only and don't
make a lot. You want to make a little dough-ball about the size of a
golf ball. Then refresh it every couple of days by peeling off the
exterior "skin" and combining the interior with fresh mesquite +
water. If it's going to work, it will start fermenting within 6 or 7
days.

I googled the flour, sounds interesting. Good luck.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 05:07 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
Sam Sam is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 218
Default Mesquite flour starter

Will wrote:
On Aug 4, 3:53 pm, wrote:

... I'm adding about a cup of all
purpose flour to a few tablespoons of mesquite flour because I don't
think the mesquite flour has much in the way of sugar and starch.


You won't know until you try. But try with Mesquite only and don't
make a lot. You want to make a little dough-ball about the size of a
golf ball. Then refresh it every couple of days by peeling off the
exterior "skin" and combining the interior with fresh mesquite +
water. If it's going to work, it will start fermenting within 6 or 7
days.


How do you know something grows? Ever tried mesquite and know it gets
sour and does not get stinky?

If you ask me - anyone starting with anything but full grain rye is
counterproductive.

As for your method - there are many ways to start a starter. Go to a
library and look through bread books, makes (my) hair stand up so much
crap is in there.

(not saying your's is - the potato water moon cycle method is)

IMO, best method is to keep the hydration in a way it is stirrable and
can be watched through a glass container for gas bubbles.

In addition, as much as possible keep notes on weights used, time,
temperature, so it's in some way repeatable and can be compared - if you
want to do something good and report it here.

The dough ball skin method achieves nothing of that, only a it
works/does not work result.

Sam




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 07:49 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 15
Default Mesquite flour starter

Sam wrote:

If you ask me - anyone starting with anything but full grain rye is
counterproductive.



Why is that?

I ask because all I have ever used is freshly-ground whole white wheat,
and it works quite well. Granted, I live in the San Francisco Bay Area,
but....
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-08-2008, 09:34 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 441
Default Mesquite flour starter

On Aug 5, 11:07 am, Sam wrote:

IMO, best method is to keep the hydration in a way it is stirrable and
can be watched through a glass container for gas bubbles.


I've done it that way... but prefer the doughball because it's easier
to guage the ferment via smell when I open the doughball. I don't know
how many times I've made starters with doughballs, quite a few, but
they've always worked and I trust my nose more than bubbles or foam.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-08-2008, 03:53 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
Sam Sam is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 218
Default Mesquite flour starter

Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to reply wrote:
Sam wrote:

If you ask me - anyone starting with anything but full grain rye is
counterproductive.



Why is that?

I ask because all I have ever used is freshly-ground whole white wheat,
and it works quite well. Granted, I live in the San Francisco Bay Area,
but....

Higher germ count for sure. Grown in wetter areas than wheat, probably.

In EU, it's in south - IT, RU-Ukraine all wheat and in north - SE, NO,
FI, NO-DE, N-RU more or all rye.

They have yearly crop reports on rye (probably also wheat) conditions.

The rye kernels I get here in US-CO are from CAN.

Maybe "counterproductive" is an overstatement but if I remember right,
there were several folks here which had problems with wheat flour and
rye did it.

S.


_______________________________________________
Rec.food.sourdough mailing list

http://www.mountainbitwarrior.com/ma...food.sourdough



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-08-2008, 04:17 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 15
Default Mesquite flour starter

Thanks. You learn something new every day.

Sam wrote:

Why is that?

I ask because all I have ever used is freshly-ground whole white
wheat, and it works quite well. Granted, I live in the San Francisco
Bay Area, but....

Higher germ count for sure. Grown in wetter areas than wheat, probably.

In EU, it's in south - IT, RU-Ukraine all wheat and in north - SE, NO,
FI, NO-DE, N-RU more or all rye.

They have yearly crop reports on rye (probably also wheat) conditions.

The rye kernels I get here in US-CO are from CAN.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-08-2008, 09:42 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 325
Default Mesquite flour starter

I have had the same results both from wheat and rye, I've had a bad
starter that I gave up on with rye and wheat, I've had good starters
from both and each individually, including white flour, (wheat).

I agree that you are better off with a batter, use as little as you
can handle so as not to waste flour. (The method Will describes does
work but the batter method is easier and quicker, after a few days
your enthusiasm will wane and you might be busy, youíll want something
quick you donít have to think about) add water to the batter at feed
time, about equal parts batter to water, then mix well, tip all but a
small bit away and feed that small bit with enough flour to make
another batter. There really is no need to measure anything (I know
Sam didnít say there was but it you could get that impression) That
works well not to waste flour. It could take 1 to 2 weeks to get the
starter how it should be to bake with. I just made one it's taken 10
days to get the starter so that I feel it's normal.

Youíll read so many times, ĎÖ It sure does smell sour, yay!í In my
experience that Ďsourí is more like the smell of PVA rather than an
vinegar, I donít use a starter til thatís gone.

So, Will is right too, trust your nose not the bubbles.

Good luck.

Jim


On 6 Aug, 04:17, Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to reply
wrote:
Thanks. *You learn something new every day.

...



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-09-2017, 12:25 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1
Default Mesquite flour starter

Well...?!??? Did the mesquite work??? I am in Tucson and have just harvested about a half pound of pods. I am anxious to try and make a sourdough starter with it!

To whomever posted about yeast in the desert... we have it. I have a whole wheat starter that I have been running for several months. I think that I will take some of the mesquite flour and try feeding some of my whole wheat starter to see if it thrives/survives the change in diet before I trial a native starter using my precious (a bit of work to harvest, pick through, dry and grind pods to "flour") mesquite flour.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mesquite Pod Flour Sal Paradise General Cooking 0 29-07-2015 07:23 PM
Q: Mesquite Lump? Does it add mesquite flavor? Janet Wilder[_1_] Barbecue 13 16-06-2011 02:40 AM
Starter flour question Chris[_23_] Sourdough 5 06-07-2010 11:11 AM
Rye Starter - fed with White Flour? Denny_from_MO Sourdough 0 01-02-2006 08:18 PM
New Starter and Flour Quality Nabuco Sourdough 2 30-01-2004 09:33 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:39 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2017 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017