Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 02-07-2006, 06:48 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates

I posted a similar question on alt.food.barbecue. It may be more
appropriate for this NG., Curing, to reduce botulism etc. is an important
part of low temperature smoking.
Have any of you cured with nitrites or nitrates in your brine, or
cure? I have done a dry rub with Morton's Tenderquick[.5% sodium nitrite and
nitrate], with limited success as it only cures the surface.
The FDA says that your finished cured meat shouldn't have more than 200
parts per million to avoid the evil cancer from emerging.
If any have used Tenderquick, what is your recipe for the brine. How much
Tenderquick do you use per quart of cure and how did you arrive at it?
Mortons does not post any of this on their site. Obviously they should.
Thanks,
Kent



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Old 02-07-2006, 07:22 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates

Kent wrote:
I posted a similar question on alt.food.barbecue. It may be more
appropriate for this NG., Curing, to reduce botulism etc. is an important
part of low temperature smoking.
Have any of you cured with nitrites or nitrates in your brine, or
cure? I have done a dry rub with Morton's Tenderquick[.5% sodium nitrite and
nitrate], with limited success as it only cures the surface.
The FDA says that your finished cured meat shouldn't have more than 200
parts per million to avoid the evil cancer from emerging.
If any have used Tenderquick, what is your recipe for the brine. How much
Tenderquick do you use per quart of cure and how did you arrive at it?
Mortons does not post any of this on their site. Obviously they should.
Thanks,
Kent




What are you curing? Salt/nitrite/nitrate rubbed on the surface of the
meat does not just cure the outside, it slowly penetrates the whole
piece of meat thru osmosis, but I don't remember the rate of absorption.
(I think it's one inch per week.) Many years ago, my dad an I
butchered a hog every winter and we cured the hams, bacon, and jowls by
rubbing them with Morton Sugar Cure and curing them in the bottom of the
refrigerator for a couple of weeks. In retrospect, Tenderquick would
have worked better for the bacon and jowls.

I've used Tenderquick to cure salami. I just used it in place of salt.
I have an unopened 2# bag of Prague Powder that I'll start using when
the bag of Tenderquick is finally used up.

Best regards,
Bob
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Old 03-07-2006, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates


"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:
I posted a similar question on alt.food.barbecue. It may be more
appropriate for this NG., Curing, to reduce botulism etc. is an important
part of low temperature smoking.
Have any of you cured with nitrites or nitrates in your brine, or
cure? I have done a dry rub with Morton's Tenderquick[.5% sodium nitrite
and
nitrate], with limited success as it only cures the surface.
The FDA says that your finished cured meat shouldn't have more than 200
parts per million to avoid the evil cancer from emerging.
If any have used Tenderquick, what is your recipe for the brine. How much
Tenderquick do you use per quart of cure and how did you arrive at it?
Mortons does not post any of this on their site. Obviously they should.
Thanks,
Kent


What are you curing? Salt/nitrite/nitrate rubbed on the surface of the
meat does not just cure the outside, it slowly penetrates the whole piece
of meat thru osmosis, but I don't remember the rate of absorption. (I
think it's one inch per week.) Many years ago, my dad an I butchered a
hog every winter and we cured the hams, bacon, and jowls by rubbing them
with Morton Sugar Cure and curing them in the bottom of the refrigerator
for a couple of weeks. In retrospect, Tenderquick would have worked
better for the bacon and jowls.


This is true for a very long dry cured ham like proscuitto. You're not going
to accomplish that in two weeks.

I've used Tenderquick to cure salami. I just used it in place of salt. I
have an unopened 2# bag of Prague Powder that I'll start using when the
bag of Tenderquick is finally used up.

Best regards,
Bob


Be careful. Prague powder has 6.4% nitrite. Morton's TenderQuick has .5%.
You're curing with more than 10 times more nitrite.
Kent


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Old 03-07-2006, 07:24 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates

Kent wrote:
"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:
I posted a similar question on alt.food.barbecue. It may be more
appropriate for this NG., Curing, to reduce botulism etc. is an important
part of low temperature smoking.
Have any of you cured with nitrites or nitrates in your brine, or
cure? I have done a dry rub with Morton's Tenderquick[.5% sodium nitrite
and
nitrate], with limited success as it only cures the surface.
The FDA says that your finished cured meat shouldn't have more than 200
parts per million to avoid the evil cancer from emerging.
If any have used Tenderquick, what is your recipe for the brine. How much
Tenderquick do you use per quart of cure and how did you arrive at it?
Mortons does not post any of this on their site. Obviously they should.
Thanks,
Kent

What are you curing? Salt/nitrite/nitrate rubbed on the surface of the
meat does not just cure the outside, it slowly penetrates the whole piece
of meat thru osmosis, but I don't remember the rate of absorption. (I
think it's one inch per week.) Many years ago, my dad an I butchered a
hog every winter and we cured the hams, bacon, and jowls by rubbing them
with Morton Sugar Cure and curing them in the bottom of the refrigerator
for a couple of weeks. In retrospect, Tenderquick would have worked
better for the bacon and jowls.


This is true for a very long dry cured ham like proscuitto. You're not going
to accomplish that in two weeks.


It also works for a boneless ham; especially if you put it in a plastic
tub and let it sit in its own juice.

I've used Tenderquick to cure salami. I just used it in place of salt. I
have an unopened 2# bag of Prague Powder that I'll start using when the
bag of Tenderquick is finally used up.


Be careful. Prague powder has 6.4% nitrite. Morton's TenderQuick has .5%.
You're curing with more than 10 times more nitrite.



I'm aware of that. I won't use Prague as a direct replacement for TQ.
I'll calculate the amount of Prague to use for the pounds of meat, then
add salt so the total equals the amount of TQ in the recipe.

Thanks,
Bob
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Old 04-07-2006, 06:19 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates


"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:
"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:
I posted a similar question on alt.food.barbecue. It may be more
appropriate for this NG., Curing, to reduce botulism etc. is an
important part of low temperature smoking.
Have any of you cured with nitrites or nitrates in your brine, or
cure? I have done a dry rub with Morton's Tenderquick[.5% sodium
nitrite and
nitrate], with limited success as it only cures the surface.
The FDA says that your finished cured meat shouldn't have more than 200
parts per million to avoid the evil cancer from emerging.
If any have used Tenderquick, what is your recipe for the brine. How
much Tenderquick do you use per quart of cure and how did you arrive at
it? Mortons does not post any of this on their site. Obviously they
should.
Thanks,
Kent
What are you curing? Salt/nitrite/nitrate rubbed on the surface of the
meat does not just cure the outside, it slowly penetrates the whole
piece of meat thru osmosis, but I don't remember the rate of absorption.
(I think it's one inch per week.) Many years ago, my dad an I butchered
a hog every winter and we cured the hams, bacon, and jowls by rubbing
them with Morton Sugar Cure and curing them in the bottom of the
refrigerator for a couple of weeks. In retrospect, Tenderquick would
have worked better for the bacon and jowls.


This is true for a very long dry cured ham like proscuitto. You're not
going to accomplish that in two weeks.


It also works for a boneless ham; especially if you put it in a plastic
tub and let it sit in its own juice.

I've used Tenderquick to cure salami. I just used it in place of salt.
I have an unopened 2# bag of Prague Powder that I'll start using when
the bag of Tenderquick is finally used up.


Be careful. Prague powder has 6.4% nitrite. Morton's TenderQuick has .5%.
You're curing with more than 10 times more nitrite.



I'm aware of that. I won't use Prague as a direct replacement for TQ.
I'll calculate the amount of Prague to use for the pounds of meat, then
add salt so the total equals the amount of TQ in the recipe.

Thanks,
Bob


The problem with that is that you don't know the ratio of sugar to salt in
TQ.
Kent




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Old 04-07-2006, 06:59 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates

Kent wrote:

The problem with that is that you don't know the ratio of sugar to salt in
TQ.



TQ contains an insignificant amount of sugar. On the
order of 2% or less.


--
Reg

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Old 04-07-2006, 07:34 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates


"Reg" wrote in message
y.net...
Kent wrote:

The problem with that is that you don't know the ratio of sugar to salt
in TQ.



TQ contains an insignificant amount of sugar. On the
order of 2% or less.
Reg


Reg, if you assume TQ is 98% or so NaCl, the salt concentration of the brine
cure recipe on the TQ label is 40%. They say one cup TQ to 4 cups H20.
That's almost poisonous. Even if the salt to sugar ratio was-is 50% the
brine would be 20+-% NaCl. That's half poisonous. To eat that much salt you
would have to take a diuretic like thiazide before eating.


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Old 04-07-2006, 08:29 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Curing with Tenderquick, or nitrites and nitrates

Kent wrote:

Reg, if you assume TQ is 98% or so NaCl, the salt concentration of the brine
cure recipe on the TQ label is 40%. They say one cup TQ to 4 cups H20.
That's almost poisonous. Even if the salt to sugar ratio was-is 50% the
brine would be 20+-% NaCl. That's half poisonous. To eat that much salt you
would have to take a diuretic like thiazide before eating.


It's not 98% salt, it's 97%. That's been disclosed by Morton.
Now do the remaining math. It's also 0.5% nitrite and 0.5%
nitrate, plus trace amounts of glycol.

How much sugar would that make it, then?

Another (rather obvious) test: taste it. No sugar.

BTW, the high level of salt in the recipe on the package
results in an overly salty product, but it's hardly anything
unusual. People have been using saturated salt solutions
to cure meat since forever. It's as old as curing itself.

--
Reg



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