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Pete 27-06-2004 02:52 PM

Making Jelly
 
Got a question that might seem dumb but can I use a pot with a non stick
surface for making jelly? Seems that I am under the impression that it
can't for some reason but wanted to make sure before I made jelly soon.
Thanks in advance.



Melba's Jammin' 27-06-2004 04:19 PM

Making Jelly
 
In article , "Pete"
wrote:

Got a question that might seem dumb but can I use a pot with a non stick
surface for making jelly? Seems that I am under the impression that it
can't for some reason but wanted to make sure before I made jelly soon.
Thanks in advance.



I can't think of any reason to not use one if it's large enough to
contain a good rolling boil. While admittedly not the same, I use a
non-stick-coated dutch oven for making my fruit butters -- and they'll
still burn if I'm not Ever Vigilant! (A timer, set for five minutes,
helps me out!)
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com Sam I Am updated 6/20/04.


The Joneses 27-06-2004 08:32 PM

Making Jelly
 
Melba's Jammin' wrote:

In article , "Pete"
wrote:

Got a question that might seem dumb but can I use a pot with a non stick
surface for making jelly? Seems that I am under the impression that it
can't for some reason but wanted to make sure before I made jelly soon.
Thanks in advance.



I can't think of any reason to not use one if it's large enough to
contain a good rolling boil. While admittedly not the same, I use a
non-stick-coated dutch oven for making my fruit butters -- and they'll
still burn if I'm not Ever Vigilant! (A timer, set for five minutes,
helps me out!)
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com Sam I Am updated 6/20/04.


Sounds like a good idear. I had a related experience. I went from a standard
stock pot sort of pot (a trifle heavier than lighter) to a saucepan with a
very heavy bottom. I thought it would simmer more evenly or something. Turns
out the heavier pan kept the heat longer, even after I took it off the fire.
I think a lighter weight pan would heat up lots quicker and maybe burn. A
thought anyway. I have so few I can't afford to waste them.
Edrena




George Shirley 27-06-2004 08:36 PM

Making Jelly
 
The Joneses wrote:
Melba's Jammin' wrote:


In article , "Pete"
wrote:


Got a question that might seem dumb but can I use a pot with a non stick
surface for making jelly? Seems that I am under the impression that it
can't for some reason but wanted to make sure before I made jelly soon.
Thanks in advance.



I can't think of any reason to not use one if it's large enough to
contain a good rolling boil. While admittedly not the same, I use a
non-stick-coated dutch oven for making my fruit butters -- and they'll
still burn if I'm not Ever Vigilant! (A timer, set for five minutes,
helps me out!)
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com Sam I Am updated 6/20/04.



Sounds like a good idear. I had a related experience. I went from a standard
stock pot sort of pot (a trifle heavier than lighter) to a saucepan with a
very heavy bottom. I thought it would simmer more evenly or something. Turns
out the heavier pan kept the heat longer, even after I took it off the fire.
I think a lighter weight pan would heat up lots quicker and maybe burn. A
thought anyway. I have so few I can't afford to waste them.
Edrena



I have two pots I use to make jellies and jams. One is a six quart pan
that came with a set of pots we bought in 1971. Stainless steel outside
and inside with a carbon steel layer in the walls and an aluminum
sandwich in the bottom. Takes and hold heat readily but is easy to
control the jelly in if you take the time to learn how to use it. The
other is a thin wall and bottom stainless stock pot of about two gallon
size and very tall. The thin walled pot has lead me to burn jelly more
often than the thick walled one. Never thought of using a teflon lined
pot, probably because all the teflon pans we have are skillets. I don't
see why you couldn't make jellies and jams in any pot you have as long
as watch your product, check the temperature regularly and stir when
needed. I cook on an electric stove and have learned when and how to cut
the heat back to maintain the jam pot, the BWB, and the pressure canner.
Easy to remember as I wrote it all down, CRS you know.

George



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