Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 01-04-2004, 11:28 PM
Scott
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

I happened to stop at this antiques/consignment shop that I haven't been
to for quite a while. While browsing about, a device caught my eye. At
first glance, I dismissed it as an old, fancy-looking percolator. But
something about it bugged me, so I looked it over again.

Pretty quickly, it became clear that this was *not* a percolator; it
also looked vaguely familiar. I bought it, for the princely sum of $12,
and took it home.

Opening up Bramah's "Coffee Makers," I flipped through and found it
within about 10-15 seconds. I'll be darned--it's a "Vienna
Incomparable," a "continental version" of a Parker Steam Fountain. It's
rather battered and pretty rusty. There were a number of different
versions, and I haven't across an imprint on my device.

See:
http://homepage.mac.com/scott_r/catalog.html

Clicking on each image will enlarge the picture. I'm not sure what the
little plastic knob in the lid is for.

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Old 02-04-2004, 12:16 AM
Scott
 
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Default Apologies

Sorry, all--this went to the wrong group.

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Old 02-04-2004, 01:00 AM
Brian Mailman
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

Scott wrote:

See:
http://homepage.mac.com/scott_r/catalog.html


Oh yeah. It's a kind of samovar.

B/
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Old 02-04-2004, 02:32 AM
Ross Reid
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

Scott wrote:

I happened to stop at this antiques/consignment shop that I haven't been
to for quite a while. While browsing about, a device caught my eye. At
first glance, I dismissed it as an old, fancy-looking percolator. But
something about it bugged me, so I looked it over again.

Pretty quickly, it became clear that this was *not* a percolator; it
also looked vaguely familiar. I bought it, for the princely sum of $12,
and took it home.

Opening up Bramah's "Coffee Makers," I flipped through and found it
within about 10-15 seconds. I'll be darned--it's a "Vienna
Incomparable," a "continental version" of a Parker Steam Fountain. It's
rather battered and pretty rusty. There were a number of different
versions, and I haven't across an imprint on my device.

See:
http://homepage.mac.com/scott_r/catalog.html

Clicking on each image will enlarge the picture. I'm not sure what the
little plastic knob in the lid is for.


Looks like sort of an upside down, steam driven, French press coffee
maker that could easily have been invented by Rube Goldberg ;-).
If the little black plastic knob comes out of the lid, perhaps it must
be removed whilst brewing so the steam pressure doesn't blow glass the
lid off?
That's my guess, who's next?

Ross.
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Old 02-04-2004, 03:27 AM
smithfarms pure kona
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 22:28:09 GMT, Scott
wrote:

I happened to stop at this antiques/consignment shop that I haven't

been
to for quite a while. While browsing about, a device caught my eye.

At
first glance, I dismissed it as an old, fancy-looking percolator. But
something about it bugged me, so I looked it over again.

Pretty quickly, it became clear that this was *not* a percolator; it
also looked vaguely familiar. I bought it, for the princely sum of

$12,
and took it home.

Opening up Bramah's "Coffee Makers," I flipped through and found it
within about 10-15 seconds. I'll be darned--it's a "Vienna
Incomparable," a "continental version" of a Parker Steam Fountain.

It's
rather battered and pretty rusty. There were a number of different
versions, and I haven't across an imprint on my device.

See:
http://homepage.mac.com/scott_r/catalog.html

Clicking on each image will enlarge the picture. I'm not sure what

the
little plastic knob in the lid is for.


Scott, this is my first time here. Aloha! I wanted to make Surinam
Cherry jelly now and the search for jars is on. Glass weighs a lot,
in shipping here and then back to customers. Is there common
knowledge here on jars or even plastic that can take heat? I would so
appreciate reading about that.

BTW I suggested in alt.coffee that they use your FAQ. A.C. is in one
of its usual upheavals if you haven't been there. Danny of Merry Ole
is writing *the* FAQ or at least beginning.

With aloha,

Thunder of Smithfarms

http://www.smithfarms.com
Farmers & Sellers of 100%
Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff


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Old 02-04-2004, 04:29 AM
Scott
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

In article ,
smithfarms pure kona wrote:

Scott, this is my first time here. Aloha! I wanted to make Surinam
Cherry jelly now and the search for jars is on. Glass weighs a lot,
in shipping here and then back to customers. Is there common
knowledge here on jars or even plastic that can take heat? I would so
appreciate reading about that.


Hi, Cea! What sort of packaging are you looking for? The standard
Ball/Kerr jars with 2-piece lids are generally used here.
http://www.homecanning.com/usa/ALProducts.asp?CAT=500&P=2493

I just weighed one of mine. Empty, it weighs 6-5/8 oz.; filled with jam,
not quite 1-lb., 1-oz.

I'm not personally familiar with *food grade*, heat-resistant plastic
jars available on the consumer level.

You're growing cherries now?


BTW I suggested in alt.coffee that they use your FAQ. A.C. is in one
of its usual upheavals if you haven't been there. Danny of Merry Ole
is writing *the* FAQ or at least beginning.


Just looked... isn't Danny working on an espresso FAQ? Mine's on brewed
coffee, etc.

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Old 02-04-2004, 04:40 AM
Scott
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

In article m,
Ross Reid wrote:

Looks like sort of an upside down, steam driven, French press coffee
maker that could easily have been invented by Rube Goldberg ;-).
If the little black plastic knob comes out of the lid, perhaps it must
be removed whilst brewing so the steam pressure doesn't blow glass the
lid off?
That's my guess, who's next?



Oh, sure, the *off-topic* post I mistakenly make gets replies.

It's what I said: a "Vienna Incomparable." The initial design was made
by Samuel Parker, a brazier on Argyle Street, London, first patented in
1833. Some time later:
"the design crossed the English Channel to the Continent... to Germany
and Austria, where it was adopted and adapted. By the last half of the
nineteenth century it had a hooped frame on which it hung like a bird
cage, and it had evolved into the 'Vienna Incomparable' and even crossed
the Atlantic to the United States where it was mentioned and recommended
in several manuals of household economy and ladies' magazines. It
appeared for many years in the catalogue of the Army and Navy Stores in
London, imported from manufacturers in Germany in different sizes and
was fitted sometimes with a pouring lip and sometimes with a serving
tap. It survived well into the 1900s, Parker long forgotten, and known,
beyond all hope of correction, as a Vienna coffeemaker."

-- Edward and Joan Bramah, "Coffee Makers: 300 years of art and design"

In action, it seems to work in like the stovetop moka makers do
http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.brewers.mokapot.shtml#mokapot
water is forced by pressure up through a central tube and through
grounds held inside a perforated basket. This is *not* like what is
currently of as a percolator: the coffee does not recirculate back down
into the brewing water.

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Old 02-04-2004, 05:09 AM
smithfarms pure kona
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 03:29:15 GMT, Scott
wrote:

In article ,
smithfarms pure kona wrote:



Hi, Cea! What sort of packaging are you looking for? The standard
Ball/Kerr jars with 2-piece lids are generally used here.
http://www.homecanning.com/usa/ALProducts.asp?CAT=500&P=2493

I just weighed one of mine. Empty, it weighs 6-5/8 oz.; filled with

jam,
not quite 1-lb., 1-oz.

I'm not personally familiar with *food grade*, heat-resistant plastic
jars available on the consumer level.

You're growing cherries now?


Surinam Cherries grow wild here. They are from Surinam and make a
delightful aromatic jelly. I wanted to find jars -that are
lightweight and then I could sell the jelly from my web site. There
is more fruit than I can use which is sinful. My grandmother made
Surinam Jelly annually--like her world famous Mango Chutney.

aloha,
Thunder's pal


http://www.smithfarms.com
Farmers & Sellers of 100%
Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
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Old 02-04-2004, 05:32 AM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default consignment store find: coffee device

In article ,
smithfarms pure kona wrote:

Surinam Cherries grow wild here. They are from Surinam and make a
delightful aromatic jelly. I wanted to find jars -that are
lightweight and then I could sell the jelly from my web site. There
is more fruit than I can use which is sinful. My grandmother made
Surinam Jelly annually--like her world famous Mango Chutney.


sigh I'm jealous. I have a lot of Concord grapes that grow on my
property, but that's it, fruitwise.

Well, it won't be like selling honey. I don't know that the health codes
are, specifically, on selling honey, but since honey is so resistant to
pathogens, I'd imagine that you wouldn't need to process it like you do
jams/jellies. And processing means heat/pressure resistant containers,
which'll have some heft to them.

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Old 02-04-2004, 02:18 PM
George Shirley
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

Scott wrote:
In article m,
Ross Reid wrote:


Looks like sort of an upside down, steam driven, French press coffee
maker that could easily have been invented by Rube Goldberg ;-).
If the little black plastic knob comes out of the lid, perhaps it must
be removed whilst brewing so the steam pressure doesn't blow glass the
lid off?
That's my guess, who's next?




Oh, sure, the *off-topic* post I mistakenly make gets replies.

It's what I said: a "Vienna Incomparable." The initial design was made
by Samuel Parker, a brazier on Argyle Street, London, first patented in
1833. Some time later:
"the design crossed the English Channel to the Continent... to Germany
and Austria, where it was adopted and adapted. By the last half of the
nineteenth century it had a hooped frame on which it hung like a bird
cage, and it had evolved into the 'Vienna Incomparable' and even crossed
the Atlantic to the United States where it was mentioned and recommended
in several manuals of household economy and ladies' magazines. It
appeared for many years in the catalogue of the Army and Navy Stores in
London, imported from manufacturers in Germany in different sizes and
was fitted sometimes with a pouring lip and sometimes with a serving
tap. It survived well into the 1900s, Parker long forgotten, and known,
beyond all hope of correction, as a Vienna coffeemaker."

-- Edward and Joan Bramah, "Coffee Makers: 300 years of art and design"

In action, it seems to work in like the stovetop moka makers do
http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.brewers.mokapot.shtml#mokapot
water is forced by pressure up through a central tube and through
grounds held inside a perforated basket. This is *not* like what is
currently of as a percolator: the coffee does not recirculate back down
into the brewing water.

Lived next door to a Canajun couple whilst in the Middle East, you're
describing the same machine, only more modern, that they made their
coffee with. Trying to think back nearly 25 years I distinctly remember
that it made excellent coffee, much better than a percolater of a drip
machine.

George



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Old 02-04-2004, 03:17 PM
Gary S.
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 07:12:23 -0500, wrote:

On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 03:29:15 GMT, Scott
wrote:


I'm not personally familiar with *food grade*, heat-resistant plastic
jars available on the consumer level.


I think there must be some though: we've bought some jam
recently (Cheap and Nasty Brand) that was in plastic jars,
also applesauce, also pasta sauce.

http://www.usplastic.com has a lot of various food-grade
plastic containers but whether or not they'd know if they
are sufficiently heat resistant, I don't know. They
probably would. A lot of their stuff is laboratory-grade,
and too expensive for production use.

For the more technical people out there, the Nalgene labware website
has a chemical resistance chart:

http://www.nalgenelabware.com/techdata/chemical/index.asp

A number of the chemicals they reference are food ingredients, and
they deal with heat and prolonged exposure, as well as every major
plastic resin used.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom
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Old 02-04-2004, 03:30 PM
Scott
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

In article ,
wrote:

I think there must be some though: we've bought some jam
recently (Cheap and Nasty Brand) that was in plastic jars,
also applesauce, also pasta sauce.

http://www.usplastic.com has a lot of various food-grade
plastic containers but whether or not they'd know if they
are sufficiently heat resistant, I don't know. They
probably would. A lot of their stuff is laboratory-grade,
and too expensive for production use.


Sure, I don't doubt that such containers may exist, I just said I've
never seen them made available to the consumer. More importantly, I
don't know if they're heat resistant enough for a BWB. Were those
products even heat processed, or did they rely on preservatives?

Also, the question centered around the cost of shipping glass jars; any
plastic containers would have to be inexpensive enough to not eat up the
savings in shipping costs.


They even have plastic wide-mouth 'Mason jars', although
those are *very* pricey indeed.


If I'm looking at the same thing as you are, they don't appear to be
food-grade: "These polypropylene, heavy-walled Mason Jars are ideal for
industrial waste sampling, and long-term storage."
http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/pro...e=usplastic&ca
tegory%5Fname=Jars&product%5Fid=Polypropylene+Maso n+Jars+With+Polypropyle
ne+Caps

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Old 02-04-2004, 03:37 PM
Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Apologies

In article
, Scott
wrote:

Sorry, all--this went to the wrong group.


Gotta admit you had me wondering. It was out of character.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com updated 3-29-04.
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Old 02-04-2004, 03:54 PM
smithfarms pure kona
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 14:30:03 GMT, Scott
wrote:

In article ,
wrote:

http://www.usplastic.com has a lot of various food-grade
plastic containers but whether or not they'd know if they
are sufficiently heat resistant, I don't know. They
probably would. A lot of their stuff is laboratory-grade,
and too expensive for production use.


Sure, I don't doubt that such containers may exist, I just said I've
never seen them made available to the consumer. More importantly, I
don't know if they're heat resistant enough for a BWB. Were those
products even heat processed, or did they rely on preservatives?

Also, the question centered around the cost of shipping glass jars;

any
plastic containers would have to be inexpensive enough to not eat up

the

Thank you all very much. At least I have places to investigate. I
appreciate it a great deal.

with aloha,
Thunder's keeper

http://www.smithfarms.com
Farmers & Sellers of 100%
Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
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Old 02-04-2004, 03:59 PM
Ross Reid
 
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Default consignment store find: coffee device

Scott wrote:

In article m,
Ross Reid wrote:

Looks like sort of an upside down, steam driven, French press coffee
maker that could easily have been invented by Rube Goldberg ;-).
If the little black plastic knob comes out of the lid, perhaps it must
be removed whilst brewing so the steam pressure doesn't blow glass the
lid off?
That's my guess, who's next?



Oh, sure, the *off-topic* post I mistakenly make gets replies.


(Snip)

I first read it in AC but why I replied in RFP is another question.

Ross.


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