Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 26-10-2003, 11:48 PM
Leslie G
 
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Default Late Season Preserves - Rowanberry Jelly

Rowanberry Jelly is something not usually seen in North America. It is best
to pick the berries after a good hard frost, which tends to "sweeten" their
tart astringent flavour.

This jelly is not something I would use on toast in the morning, but it
makes a wonderful accompaniment to game, goose, or duck.
Home Cookin 4.9 Chapter: Pickles, Preserves, Condiments

Rowanberry Jelly
================
2 Pounds Rowanberries (about 7 cups)
2 Pounds Crab or tart cooking apples,
Unpeeled, cut into chunks (about 8 cups)
3 Tablespoons Strained fresh lemon juice
Sugar
..
Put all of the fruits in a non reactive pan, add enough cold water to just
cover the top level of the fruit. Bring to a boil, and simmer until fruits
are tender and mushy, about 40 minutes. Stir occasionally with a wooden
spoon. Pour contents of the pan into a dampened jelly bag and let the juices
drip for 6 hours or overnight. Do not squeeze the bag or the jelly will be
cloudy.

Wash and sterilize 5 pint or 10 half pint jars.

Measure the juice and allow 1 cup sugar for every 1 1/4 cups of juice.
(Jelly makers hint: warm the sugar on the middle shelf of your oven set at
225F for 10 - 15 minutes - this reduces the cooking time of the jelly). Heat
the measured juices (lemon and rowan) in a preserving kettle, and when it
reaches a simmer, add the sugar and stir until it dissolves. Boil rapidly
until the jelling point is reached (about 10 - 12 minutes). Remove from
heat, skim off foam, pour into sterilized jars, and seal.

From the recipe archives of Leslie Gratton

Servings: 5




--
Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.



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Old 27-10-2003, 05:01 PM
Henriette Kress
 
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Default Late Season Preserves - Rowanberry Jelly

Leslie G wrote:

Rowanberry Jelly is something not usually seen in North America. It is best
to pick the berries after a good hard frost, which tends to "sweeten" their
tart astringent flavour.


Or, as most berries will either be gone or moldy by the time there's
frost, pick them, clean them, and throw them into the freezer for at least
two days before you continue your processing. In an abundant rowanberry
year (about every three years) you can get a bucket full within half an
hour or less; cleaning them is more involved, if you want to make jam. For
jelly just pick out the worse berries and throw the lot into the top part
of a "mehu-liisa" (mehu-maija over here). Add one part apples to one part
berries, add sugar to taste, let the juice drip, make into jelly.

Also, taste the berries on the trees, and if it's an abundant year, only
pick the "sweetest" (this is relative - they're still all rather bitter).

This jelly is not something I would use on toast in the morning, but it
makes a wonderful accompaniment to game, goose, or duck.


Then you're doing it wrong. Ah, found the mistake:

Rowanberry Jelly
================
2 Pounds Rowanberries (about 7 cups)
2 Pounds Crab or tart cooking apples,
Unpeeled, cut into chunks (about 8 cups)
3 Tablespoons Strained fresh lemon juice
Sugar

(snip)

until the jelling point is reached (about 10 - 12 minutes). Remove from
heat, skim off foam, pour into sterilized jars, and seal.


You need to add 1 tablespoon of a _good_ liquor to each half a kg (or
each pound) of jam/jelly/whatnot. If you add this your product will fly
off the shelves of your fridge or cellar; if you don't, it'll sit there
forever. Quality liquor is a good whisky, good gin, or Cointreau. I
haven't tried others as those suffice.
Add your brandy just before you pour and seal.

Don't make the mistake to add a cheap whisky or gin - that'll make it
taste even worse.

Another fruit that pretty much requires both
1) one part apples to one part berry, and
2) good liquor
is aronia berry.

In fact, use your rowanberry recipes for your aronia. Yum!

Henriette

--
Henriette Kress, AHG Helsinki, Finland
Henriette's herbal homepage: http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed
Best of RHOD: http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/rhod


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