Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 15-10-2018, 03:27 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Jes bought a copy of the Ball Blue Book and got me some beets to put up.

Do I need a pressure cooker fer "pickled beets" or will white vinegar
(5% acidity)? I'm jes under 8,000 feet elevation.

I plan to "julienne" them and then pickle 'em.

nb

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Old 15-10-2018, 04:33 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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notbob wrote:
Jes bought a copy of the Ball Blue Book and got me some beets to put up.

Do I need a pressure cooker fer "pickled beets" or will white vinegar
(5% acidity)? I'm jes under 8,000 feet elevation.

I plan to "julienne" them and then pickle 'em.


i cube them about 1-2cm, smaller will bleed all
the color out. which is ok if you keep the juice
you cook them in.

no pressure cooking needed for sufficiently acidic
foods as long as you observe proper food prep and
don't mess up the seals.

will keep 2-3yrs, but usually are best used within
a few years.

i like things pretty vinegary and with enough sugar
to get a proper sweet and sour taste. i also like a
lot of onions.

i clean/prep the beets first, then to cook them up
i dice them to the right size and steam them with the
onions on top. once done i add enough sugar and
vinegar to taste. i don't steam them with a huge
amount of water so i don't have to waste any juice.

always turns out well. enjoy.


songbird
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Old 15-10-2018, 09:42 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On 10/14/2018 9:33 PM, songbird wrote:

i cube them about 1-2cm, smaller will bleed all
the color out. which is ok if you keep the juice
you cook them in.


What else would I do with the "juice"?

no pressure cooking needed for sufficiently acidic
foods as long as you observe proper food prep and
don't mess up the seals.


The more I learn, the more I realize I know zip!

I usta operate a huge steam "retort" that did no. 10 cans. Turns out I
knew almost nothing about my operation. Jes "keep it this hot for this
long".

Apparently, my 5 qt Kuhn-Rikon is not big enough, even for 1 pt jars
"hot water bath" (need at least 1 inch of water above lids). Half pint
jars, yes.

Looks like I'll hafta wait until my next SSN check to buy a big enough
canner (and some "canning salt", mag lid lifter, Ove Glove, etc).

How do I know if the process is OK if the added vinegar is only "5%"
acidic. Ball Blue Book sez the food must be below "4.6%" acidic. to
qualify fer "high acid" food ....and thus requiring only a "hot water
bath". Do I need some "ph test strips"?

nb

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Old 16-10-2018, 04:43 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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notbob wrote:
....
How do I know if the process is OK if the added vinegar is only "5%"
acidic. Ball Blue Book sez the food must be below "4.6%" acidic. to
qualify fer "high acid" food ....and thus requiring only a "hot water
bath". Do I need some "ph test strips"?


i've never bothered, i usually make the
mix somewhat stronger than 2 cups of water to
1 cup of vinegar. figure that the beets will
soak some of it up. i actually do it by taste.

noway have i ever used full strength vinegar
alone.

as for BWB, we've been oven canning (Mom has
done it this way her whole life - she won't
change). i'm careful and have only a few lids
come off (budget ones - never had any problem with
the Ball lids).


songbird
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Old 16-10-2018, 04:11 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On 10/16/2018 6:46 AM, heyjoe wrote:

Not sure what the Ball Blue Book says about boiling water bath times at
altitudes over 1000 feet. "So Easy to Preserve" says to process pickled
beets in a boiling water bath for 30 minutes below 1000 feet. Above
6000 feet that processing time increases to 45 minutes and the amount of
water over the jars should be at least 2 inches and you may need to add
more boiling water if the water gets lower than 1 inch over the jar tops
during that 45 minutes.


Thnx fer the tips, Joe.

I've discovered the BBB sez 1 inch, the USDA sez 2 inches. When the two
agencies (Ball vs USDA) disagree, who should I believe?

nb



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Old 16-10-2018, 04:16 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On 10/15/2018 9:43 PM, songbird wrote:

(budget ones - never had any problem with
the Ball lids).



Thnx fer the timely info, sb.

I've read the "new" Ball lids are not as good as the "older" Ball lids,
so users are recommending using other off-brand lids. Care to
elaborate?

nb


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Old 17-10-2018, 03:16 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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notbob wrote:
....
I've read the "new" Ball lids are not as good as the "older" Ball lids,
so users are recommending using other off-brand lids. Care to
elaborate?


the way we can (oven canning) is different than BWB.

in the past when i've used some off-brand lids they
can blow off from the pressure being too much and the
lid not leaking enough during the oven stage. they
were significantly more shiney than the Ball lids so
they sealed faster and better than what we really
wanted.

note, this isn't a common happening at all, perhaps
6 lids out of a thousand, but i promptly switched to
Ball lids that i had on-hand and haven't had any issues
since then. also another note, sometimes odd jar and
ring sizes have been issues as we get a lot of jars
given to us from people who do yard sales or they know
people cleaning out their basements so sometimes we'll
have a ring or lid not work for some of those at times.

with new jars and lids, rarely any issues unless the
jar has a flaw not noticed by either of us during
cleaning/prep/filling.

i do still use off-brand lids for some things (when i
make freezer jam or some other things i freeze after
they're hot packed and then cooled down but not much
heat or processing after they're filled).


songbird
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Old 18-10-2018, 11:23 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On Mon, 15 Oct 2018 23:43:23 -0400, songbird
wrote:

notbob wrote:
...
How do I know if the process is OK if the added vinegar is only "5%"
acidic. Ball Blue Book sez the food must be below "4.6%" acidic. to
qualify fer "high acid" food ....and thus requiring only a "hot water
bath". Do I need some "ph test strips"?


i've never bothered, i usually make the
mix somewhat stronger than 2 cups of water to
1 cup of vinegar. figure that the beets will
soak some of it up. i actually do it by taste.

noway have i ever used full strength vinegar
alone.

as for BWB, we've been oven canning (Mom has
done it this way her whole life - she won't
change). i'm careful and have only a few lids
come off (budget ones - never had any problem with
the Ball lids).


From the National Center for Home Food Preservation web site, in the
section entitled "Frequently Asked Canning Questions":
Quote
Is it safe to process food in the oven?
No. This can be dangerous because the temperature will vary according
to the accuracy of oven regulators and circulation of heat. Dry heat
is very slow in penetrating into jars of food. Also, jars explode
easily in the oven.
End Quote
https://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#7

Also,
College of Agricultural Sciences
The Pennsylvania State University
in the section entitled:
"Canners and Canning Methods that are Not Recommended" says:
Quote
Solar canning, oven canning, open kettle canning, microwave
processing, and dishwashing processing are not safe canning methods.
End Quote
https://extension.psu.edu/canners-an...ot-recommended

For food safety reasons, I'd prefer to rely on information found on
those two sites rather than "Mom has done it this way her whole life".
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Old 19-10-2018, 11:34 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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heyjoe wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2018 09:43:55 -0600
in Message-ID:
notbob wrote :

On 10/19/2018 1:39 AM, songbird wrote:

wrote:


For food safety reasons, I'd prefer to rely on information found on
those two sites rather than "Mom has done it this way her whole life".


i've included caveats. and it's not just Mom, but
now also me. and that means probably 15,000 - 20,000
quarts of food with very few failures.


I once put my Fluke temp meter on my old renters-grade electric oven.
It would swing as high ....and as low.... as 30 degrees (F) above/below
set temp.

I did the same to my daughter's renters-grade GAS oven. It would swing
only 5 degrees (F) above/below set point. I've yet to do the same to
my current gas oven, so I cannot say, with any certainty, that gas
stoves are better than electric stoves.

nb


Temperature fluctuation s aside, the real problem, as I see it, is that
air doesn't transfer heat (or cold) as effective;y as water. That
increases the processing times, which assume water is the medium
transferring the heat for sterilization.


you do understand that you are not sterilizing anything
using BWB. you are killing off some microbes, but there
are others that will survive such processing. which is
why i always specify that we do only high-acid items for
the most part (i don't do any low acid items ever, Mom
does some once in a while but i don't eat them).

if you are canning where sterilization is critical (low
acid items) then you must pressure can.

as for heat transfer, i always hot pack jars. so the
heat in the oven is mainly for sealing the jars/creating
a vacuum. almost everything seals up with 15-30 minutes
of oven time.


At close to 8,000 feet, known/good processing times and proceedures are
already long. Who wants to increase them?


the longest process i run here is about 35 minutes
and that is when the oven is full (it holds 24 quarts
but i usually keep it down to 20).


songbird
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Old 20-10-2018, 04:30 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On 10/19/2018 2:24 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I process
using either a boiling water bath or canning grade pressure cooker.


I plan on buying a 23 qt Presto pressure canner (gauged). No oven
canning for me.

I've never had a broken jar, but I have had a couple of jars over the
years that failed to seal properly

I recently watched a U2B video that showed dozen of jars with no
"threaded bands" (as BBB calls 'em), on the jars. Only sealed lids.
What was that?

nb
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Old 21-10-2018, 12:31 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On Sat, 20 Oct 2018 09:30:25 -0600, notbob wrote:

I recently watched a U2B video that showed dozen of jars with no
"threaded bands" (as BBB calls 'em), on the jars. Only sealed lids.
What was that?


Once the jars are thoroughly cold, you remove the bands (which we
called "rings" in the forties). This makes it easier to spot jars
that didn't seal -- sometimes a bit of food under the seal takes a few
days to manifest -- and it frees up the rings for another batch of
jars.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


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Old 21-10-2018, 01:44 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Joy Beeson wrote:

I recently watched a U2B video that showed dozen of jars with no
"threaded bands" (as BBB calls 'em), on the jars. Only sealed lids.
What was that?


that may be people who don't wish to give away
their rings.

usually when we get new jars they come with rings and
i like to leave them on as some added protection for the
rims of the jars.


Once the jars are thoroughly cold, you remove the bands (which we
called "rings" in the forties). This makes it easier to spot jars
that didn't seal -- sometimes a bit of food under the seal takes a few
days to manifest -- and it frees up the rings for another batch of
jars.


we always wipe with a cloth to avoid any problems with
the seals in this way. well worth the effort.


songbird
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Old 21-10-2018, 02:28 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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On 10/20/2018 5:31 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Once the jars are thoroughly cold, you remove the bands (which we
called "rings" in the forties). This makes it easier to spot jars
that didn't seal -- sometimes a bit of food under the seal takes a few
days to manifes

As I suspected.

The BBB sez, "Remove the band. Gently try to remove the lid with your
fingertips. If the lid is concave and cannot be removed with your
fingertips, the jar is vacuum sealed". It goes on to explain how to
store "ringless" jars. I'm still learning.

My beets have already been tossed, so it's all about pressure cooking.
At 8K elev, I'm not entirely new to the idea. I jes couldn't get 1 inch
of water above my pint jars (half pint, yes!) in my current 5 qt
Kuhn-Rikon pressure cooker.

Thnx fer the info, Joy.

nb


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