Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 28-06-2017, 08:14 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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We're making spaghetti sauce from out bucket of mixed tomatoes. Already
have it getting ready for the pressure canner. Only made four pints but
that will be four different meals for us this winter or sooner.

Didn't get enough green beans to can this year, some sort of blight got
the beans. Pretty much the same with the cukes. But with the cukes it
may have been a blessing. We had a deluge of cukes last year so put up
lots of relish and pickles.

I suspect the problem with the garden this year is the extreme heat
we've been having followed by the January back to back freezes. Hitting
90+ most days and not a lot of rain. Plus we need to amend the whole
raised beds again. Most likely will do that this fall and then let it
lay fallow until spring.

We have a new composter, bought on line, and is working well at this
time. With just the two of us there's not much garden waste or otherwise
to fill a composter. Mowing every two weeks helps though. I see
neighbors putting their mowed grass in a bag and send it off to the
dump. If I knew what they put on their lawns I would high jack the bags. G

George

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Old 29-06-2017, 02:17 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 501
Default Putting it by

On 6/29/2017 12:04 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 Jun 2017 12:14:34p, George Shirley told us...

We're making spaghetti sauce from out bucket of mixed tomatoes.
Already have it getting ready for the pressure canner. Only made
four pints but that will be four different meals for us this
winter or sooner.

Didn't get enough green beans to can this year, some sort of
blight got the beans. Pretty much the same with the cukes. But
with the cukes it may have been a blessing. We had a deluge of
cukes last year so put up lots of relish and pickles.

I suspect the problem with the garden this year is the extreme
heat we've been having followed by the January back to back
freezes. Hitting 90+ most days and not a lot of rain. Plus we need
to amend the whole raised beds again. Most likely will do that
this fall and then let it lay fallow until spring.

We have a new composter, bought on line, and is working well at
this time. With just the two of us there's not much garden waste
or otherwise to fill a composter. Mowing every two weeks helps
though. I see neighbors putting their mowed grass in a bag and
send it off to the dump. If I knew what they put on their lawns I
would high jack the bags. G

George


As you know, we can't have a garden, but we do buy farm grown
tomatoes at a local stand. I make spaghetti sauce with ground beef,
sausage, and mushrooms. I freeze our sauce in 2-portion containers,
as it's usually just the two of us when we have spaghetti.

We have a good source for kirby cucumbers and periodically I make a
few pints of bread and butter pickles, and also a few ints of garlic
dills.

We don't really like either frozen or canned green beans, so I buy
fresh whenever we want them.

That really too bad aboaut the blight you've had this year.

If you're a gardener you will attempt to grow something even if it's on
a window ledge. You and I have probably been gardening since we could
walk. Keep it up Wayne.

We live in Harris Cty, TX and the weather for the last year has been
horrible. I think all the bug and blight problems are due to the way the
HOA takes care of the drainage pond and, I suspect, they are using some
sort of bug killer that is not good for gardeners. There's only about
four of us, mostly older people, that garden. The rest are folks that
are gone all day to work and then come home and sit in front of the TV.
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Old 29-06-2017, 11:32 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 501
Default Putting it by

On 6/29/2017 4:49 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 06:17:43a, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 12:04 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 Jun 2017 12:14:34p, George Shirley told us...

We're making spaghetti sauce from out bucket of mixed tomatoes.
Already have it getting ready for the pressure canner. Only made
four pints but that will be four different meals for us this
winter or sooner.

Didn't get enough green beans to can this year, some sort of
blight got the beans. Pretty much the same with the cukes. But
with the cukes it may have been a blessing. We had a deluge of
cukes last year so put up lots of relish and pickles.

I suspect the problem with the garden this year is the extreme
heat we've been having followed by the January back to back
freezes. Hitting 90+ most days and not a lot of rain. Plus we
need to amend the whole raised beds again. Most likely will do
that this fall and then let it lay fallow until spring.

We have a new composter, bought on line, and is working well at
this time. With just the two of us there's not much garden waste
or otherwise to fill a composter. Mowing every two weeks helps
though. I see neighbors putting their mowed grass in a bag and
send it off to the dump. If I knew what they put on their lawns
I would high jack the bags. G

George


As you know, we can't have a garden, but we do buy farm grown
tomatoes at a local stand. I make spaghetti sauce with ground
beef, sausage, and mushrooms. I freeze our sauce in 2-portion
containers, as it's usually just the two of us when we have
spaghetti.

We have a good source for kirby cucumbers and periodically I make
a few pints of bread and butter pickles, and also a few ints of
garlic dills.

We don't really like either frozen or canned green beans, so I
buy fresh whenever we want them.

That really too bad aboaut the blight you've had this year.

If you're a gardener you will attempt to grow something even if
it's on a window ledge. You and I have probably been gardening
since we could walk. Keep it up Wayne.

We live in Harris Cty, TX and the weather for the last year has
been horrible. I think all the bug and blight problems are due to
the way the HOA takes care of the drainage pond and, I suspect,
they are using some sort of bug killer that is not good for
gardeners. There's only about four of us, mostly older people,
that garden. The rest are folks that are gone all day to work and
then come home and sit in front of the TV.


For the first two years we lived here we tried gardening in large
pots on the patio. We have no soil or grass areas. Things would get
a good start in late April or early May, but by the end of July
everything had died. We did our best to keep everything properly
irrigated and misted as each type of plant required, as well as using
the best soil and fertilizer, and we just got tired of failure.

The only plants that have grown successfully on our patio are cactii
and palms.

When we lived in Queen Creek, about 28 miles SW of Phoenix, we had a
very large bck yard where we had mature orange, lemon, and lime
trees, as well as various palms and cactii. The perimeter wall was
planted with ever-blooming bougainvillea. We had the landscapers
installed a 21 x 20 raised bed, and everything had automated drip
irrigation and misters. We were able to grow tomatoes, cucumbers,
pumpkin, summer squash, green onions, and radishes. I know there
were a few other things, but can't remember. We never tried corn.
The overall atmosphere seemed to be perfect for growing almost
anything. We even had sever red and black currant bushes scattered
around the yard. When we left that house, nothing ever grew for us
again. :-(

I can understand that, we lived on ten acres for the first sixteen years
of a now fifty-seven year marriage. Then we moved and had about a
quarter acre in a subdivision that was covered with large trees. When we
moved to Corpus Christi we had a large backyard but we were to busy to
put in a garden. Now we live on 6500 square feet with a 1960 square foot
home. The backyard is crammed with "stuff." 32 feet of four foot wide
raised beds, a two foot wide garden around the fence for flowers, fruit,
etc. Since I can't bend over anymore I can't do a lot but do the
canning, cooking, etc. as needed. Doctors say there's nothing they can
do about the severe arthritis that loads me down. I guess I inherited
from my mother, she had severe arthritis for years but lived with it
until she passed at 89. I also inherited Dad's heart disease, he left us
at age 71 and I'm running up on 78 already. You just have to do whatever
is needed. At our age I don't think we could handle 10 acres plus
critters, big tractors, etc. We had young kids back then who loved the
farm too. Now they're successful fifty plus working folk. Daughter is an
assistant principal in a large grade school, son is assistant director
of Texas Children's Hospital and his wife is a realtor. Everyone is busy
at something but we try to make a holiday occasionally.

I'm just happy to be alive and close to our kids, grands, and great grands.

George
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Old 30-06-2017, 03:03 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 501
Default Putting it by

On 6/29/2017 7:01 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 03:32:26p, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 4:49 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 06:17:43a, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 12:04 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 Jun 2017 12:14:34p, George Shirley told us...

We're making spaghetti sauce from out bucket of mixed
tomatoes. Already have it getting ready for the pressure
canner. Only made four pints but that will be four different
meals for us this winter or sooner.

Didn't get enough green beans to can this year, some sort of
blight got the beans. Pretty much the same with the cukes. But
with the cukes it may have been a blessing. We had a deluge of
cukes last year so put up lots of relish and pickles.

I suspect the problem with the garden this year is the extreme
heat we've been having followed by the January back to back
freezes. Hitting 90+ most days and not a lot of rain. Plus we
need to amend the whole raised beds again. Most likely will do
that this fall and then let it lay fallow until spring.

We have a new composter, bought on line, and is working well
at this time. With just the two of us there's not much garden
waste or otherwise to fill a composter. Mowing every two weeks
helps though. I see neighbors putting their mowed grass in a
bag and send it off to the dump. If I knew what they put on
their lawns I would high jack the bags. G

George


As you know, we can't have a garden, but we do buy farm grown
tomatoes at a local stand. I make spaghetti sauce with ground
beef, sausage, and mushrooms. I freeze our sauce in 2-portion
containers, as it's usually just the two of us when we have
spaghetti.

We have a good source for kirby cucumbers and periodically I
make a few pints of bread and butter pickles, and also a few
ints of garlic dills.

We don't really like either frozen or canned green beans, so I
buy fresh whenever we want them.

That really too bad aboaut the blight you've had this year.

If you're a gardener you will attempt to grow something even if
it's on a window ledge. You and I have probably been gardening
since we could walk. Keep it up Wayne.

We live in Harris Cty, TX and the weather for the last year has
been horrible. I think all the bug and blight problems are due
to the way the HOA takes care of the drainage pond and, I
suspect, they are using some sort of bug killer that is not good
for gardeners. There's only about four of us, mostly older
people, that garden. The rest are folks that are gone all day to
work and then come home and sit in front of the TV.


For the first two years we lived here we tried gardening in large
pots on the patio. We have no soil or grass areas. Things would
get a good start in late April or early May, but by the end of
July everything had died. We did our best to keep everything
properly irrigated and misted as each type of plant required, as
well as using the best soil and fertilizer, and we just got
tired of failure.

The only plants that have grown successfully on our patio are
cactii and palms.

When we lived in Queen Creek, about 28 miles SW of Phoenix, we
had a very large bck yard where we had mature orange, lemon, and
lime trees, as well as various palms and cactii. The perimeter
wall was planted with ever-blooming bougainvillea. We had the
landscapers installed a 21 x 20 raised bed, and everything had
automated drip irrigation and misters. We were able to grow
tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkin, summer squash, green onions, and
radishes. I know there were a few other things, but can't
remember. We never tried corn. The overall atmosphere seemed to
be perfect for growing almost anything. We even had sever red and
black currant bushes scattered around the yard. When we left
that house, nothing ever grew for us again. :-(

I can understand that, we lived on ten acres for the first sixteen
years of a now fifty-seven year marriage. Then we moved and had
about a quarter acre in a subdivision that was covered with large
trees. When we moved to Corpus Christi we had a large backyard but
we were to busy to put in a garden. Now we live on 6500 square
feet with a 1960 square foot home. The backyard is crammed with
"stuff." 32 feet of four foot wide raised beds, a two foot wide
garden around the fence for flowers, fruit, etc. Since I can't
bend over anymore I can't do a lot but do the canning, cooking,
etc. as needed. Doctors say there's nothing they can do about the
severe arthritis that loads me down. I guess I inherited from my
mother, she had severe arthritis for years but lived with it until
she passed at 89. I also inherited Dad's heart disease, he left us
at age 71 and I'm running up on 78 already. You just have to do
whatever is needed. At our age I don't think we could handle 10
acres plus critters, big tractors, etc. We had young kids back
then who loved the farm too. Now they're successful fifty plus
working folk. Daughter is an assistant principal in a large grade
school, son is assistant director of Texas Children's Hospital and
his wife is a realtor. Everyone is busy at something but we try to
make a holiday occasionally.

I'm just happy to be alive and close to our kids, grands, and
great grands.

George


I totally get it, George. I'm now 72 and David is 68. He has had a
quadruple coronary bypass, a total knee replacemet, and just recently
had a complete shoulder reconstruction. I have had 4 coronary artery
stent implants, and now have spinal stenosis in both the lower and
upper spine. I'm not supposed to bend over from the waist or lift
more than ten pounds of anything. All that being said, we really not
in such bad shape. I have no children and close relatives. David
has 5 siblings who all live in Cleveland. He also has 3 children
from whom he is estranged, but it's all for the good. We're lucky to
have a small but close circle of friends here in Phoenix.

I can see what you're saying. 42 micro strokes, four major strokes, have
a stroke, have another one thirty minutes later. Five stents in my
heart, several heart attacks, cracked my chest some years ago and put a
tube around a clog in my heart arteries and five years later the old
clog bypassed itself. It's weird how your own body can try and correct
the problem. I've been on insulin for many years now, shoot 45 units
every day, have a large pill box and most of the pills have names I
can't read plus doctors have me on all kinds of fish oil, vitamins, etc.
I could afford a new car if I didn't have to buy pills and pay doctors.
Getting old is a bitch but it sure beats the alternative, been there,
done that. I'm still grinning but walking a lot slower. Getting old is
much better than the alternative. We have two children, five
grandchildren, and, so far, six great grand children and we enjoy them all.

George
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Old 30-06-2017, 02:05 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 501
Default Putting it by

On 6/29/2017 11:15 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 07:03:47p, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 7:01 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 03:32:26p, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 4:49 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 29 Jun 2017 06:17:43a, George Shirley told us...

On 6/29/2017 12:04 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 Jun 2017 12:14:34p, George Shirley told us...

We're making spaghetti sauce from out bucket of mixed
tomatoes. Already have it getting ready for the pressure
canner. Only made four pints but that will be four different
meals for us this winter or sooner.

Didn't get enough green beans to can this year, some sort of
blight got the beans. Pretty much the same with the cukes.
But with the cukes it may have been a blessing. We had a
deluge of cukes last year so put up lots of relish and
pickles.

I suspect the problem with the garden this year is the
extreme heat we've been having followed by the January back
to back freezes. Hitting 90+ most days and not a lot of
rain. Plus we need to amend the whole raised beds again.
Most likely will do that this fall and then let it lay
fallow until spring.

We have a new composter, bought on line, and is working well
at this time. With just the two of us there's not much
garden waste or otherwise to fill a composter. Mowing every
two weeks helps though. I see neighbors putting their mowed
grass in a bag and send it off to the dump. If I knew what
they put on their lawns I would high jack the bags. G

George


As you know, we can't have a garden, but we do buy farm grown
tomatoes at a local stand. I make spaghetti sauce with
ground beef, sausage, and mushrooms. I freeze our sauce in
2-portion containers, as it's usually just the two of us when
we have spaghetti.

We have a good source for kirby cucumbers and periodically I
make a few pints of bread and butter pickles, and also a few
ints of garlic dills.

We don't really like either frozen or canned green beans, so
I buy fresh whenever we want them.

That really too bad aboaut the blight you've had this year.

If you're a gardener you will attempt to grow something even
if it's on a window ledge. You and I have probably been
gardening since we could walk. Keep it up Wayne.

We live in Harris Cty, TX and the weather for the last year
has been horrible. I think all the bug and blight problems are
due to the way the HOA takes care of the drainage pond and, I
suspect, they are using some sort of bug killer that is not
good for gardeners. There's only about four of us, mostly
older people, that garden. The rest are folks that are gone
all day to work and then come home and sit in front of the TV.


For the first two years we lived here we tried gardening in
large pots on the patio. We have no soil or grass areas.
Things would get a good start in late April or early May, but
by the end of July everything had died. We did our best to
keep everything properly irrigated and misted as each type of
plant required, as well as using the best soil and fertilizer,
and we just got tired of failure.

The only plants that have grown successfully on our patio are
cactii and palms.

When we lived in Queen Creek, about 28 miles SW of Phoenix, we
had a very large bck yard where we had mature orange, lemon,
and lime trees, as well as various palms and cactii. The
perimeter wall was planted with ever-blooming bougainvillea.
We had the landscapers installed a 21 x 20 raised bed, and
everything had automated drip irrigation and misters. We were
able to grow tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkin, summer squash, green
onions, and radishes. I know there were a few other things,
but can't remember. We never tried corn. The overall
atmosphere seemed to be perfect for growing almost anything. We
even had sever red and black currant bushes scattered around
the yard. When we left that house, nothing ever grew for us
again. :-(

I can understand that, we lived on ten acres for the first
sixteen years of a now fifty-seven year marriage. Then we moved
and had about a quarter acre in a subdivision that was covered
with large trees. When we moved to Corpus Christi we had a large
backyard but we were to busy to put in a garden. Now we live on
6500 square feet with a 1960 square foot home. The backyard is
crammed with "stuff." 32 feet of four foot wide raised beds, a
two foot wide garden around the fence for flowers, fruit, etc.
Since I can't bend over anymore I can't do a lot but do the
canning, cooking, etc. as needed. Doctors say there's nothing
they can do about the severe arthritis that loads me down. I
guess I inherited from my mother, she had severe arthritis for
years but lived with it until she passed at 89. I also inherited
Dad's heart disease, he left us at age 71 and I'm running up on
78 already. You just have to do whatever is needed. At our age I
don't think we could handle 10 acres plus critters, big
tractors, etc. We had young kids back then who loved the farm
too. Now they're successful fifty plus working folk. Daughter is
an assistant principal in a large grade school, son is assistant
director of Texas Children's Hospital and his wife is a realtor.
Everyone is busy at something but we try to make a holiday
occasionally.

I'm just happy to be alive and close to our kids, grands, and
great grands.

George


I totally get it, George. I'm now 72 and David is 68. He has
had a quadruple coronary bypass, a total knee replacemet, and
just recently had a complete shoulder reconstruction. I have had
4 coronary artery stent implants, and now have spinal stenosis in
both the lower and upper spine. I'm not supposed to bend over
from the waist or lift more than ten pounds of anything. All
that being said, we really not in such bad shape. I have no
children and close relatives. David has 5 siblings who all live
in Cleveland. He also has 3 children from whom he is estranged,
but it's all for the good. We're lucky to have a small but close
circle of friends here in Phoenix.

I can see what you're saying. 42 micro strokes, four major
strokes, have a stroke, have another one thirty minutes later.
Five stents in my heart, several heart attacks, cracked my chest
some years ago and put a tube around a clog in my heart arteries
and five years later the old clog bypassed itself. It's weird how
your own body can try and correct the problem. I've been on
insulin for many years now, shoot 45 units every day, have a large
pill box and most of the pills have names I can't read plus
doctors have me on all kinds of fish oil, vitamins, etc. I could
afford a new car if I didn't have to buy pills and pay doctors.
Getting old is a bitch but it sure beats the alternative, been
there, done that. I'm still grinning but walking a lot slower.
Getting old is much better than the alternative. We have two
children, five grandchildren, and, so far, six great grand
children and we enjoy them all.

George


Wow, George! I knew you had suffered through several heart issues,
but had no idea how many and how serious. God must really be
watching over you. David and I are diabetic and have cholesterol
issues, but with medication everything has been well controlled.
Neither of us are on insulin (yet). We both have large pill boxes.
:-) I think we both take about the same number of pills a day, but
not all the same. I know I take 16 assorted pills and supplements
every day, plus using a Fentanyl patch to help control my back pain.
I get quarterly spinal injections and hope that I won't every need
spinal surgery. Before I began the spinal injections I hadn't walked
in over two years, but my pain management physician is a magician!
As long as I maintain my back, I literally have no pain, but I have
to behave. :-) As you said, getting old is a bitch, but is sure beats
the alternative, and we're making the best of it. How is Miss Ann's
health? Good, I hope!

I did good on marrying Miz Anne, her Mom's family came over from England
in the sixteen hundreds, her Dad's family came over from Germany in
1854. Both lived long lives, her Mom passed at 100+, her Dad at 80
something. She turned 77 last month, mows the lawn, cleans the house,
works in the church poor garden, teaches painting to two sets of old
ladies and one set of four children, plus cleans the house and does
everything an old geezer can't do anymore plus loves all of our extended
family. She baby sits the great grands, rubs my back when it hurts, and
is a good housewife and cook. I'm hoping I can stay around until we have
been married 60 years, getting closer every year. I met her when we were
both 18 in Maryland. She just out of high school, me just landed at
Patuxent River Naval Air Base to work in a transport squadron. Told her
the day I met her I was going to marry her and she said, "Sure you are
Sailor." We married on 12/26/1960 and we're still going strong. We argue
a lot, typical old people, but it's still fun to make up. BSEG She
carries a stainless steel top of her left leg due to a trip and fall
many years ago. I wouldn't trade her for anything.


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