Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 01-08-2014, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Hello again!

It is such a comfort to see your names and posts again after my long absence. I hope you are all well and enjoying your gardens and preserving.

Miraculously decent weather here in the central US has given our garden a real boost this year. The only things that never came up were the sugar-snap peas... again. We just have to find another supplier for those. The zucchini type squashes got off to a somewhat rocky start due to those darn squash bugs. But we finally won out by meticulously hand picking them. Ugh, how I hate that. They were even laying their eggs on the underside of the row-cover (Agribon) we use, so I had to scrape them off into a jar of soapy water.. More on the undersides of the leaves. Lots of spiders; I think they eat some of the eggs or nymphs. Anyway, we use the row cover to tent earliest plantings of cukes and zucchini. Lashing bamboo poles, the DH builds a 4' high x 4' wide box and drapes the entire affair with a lightweight Agribon, down the entire 4' w. row. This helps to minimize the bugs and then later protects the plants from burning in the hot, mid-summer sun. Once the squash bugs are under control, we roll up the sides and just leave the top covered. We do not cover later plantings.

So far, the Ravens have done best this year. We planted Barq (lt. green) as well but these were very weird because at a thick enough diameter to pick, they are only about 4 or 5 inches long. They look kind of like green goose eggs. We had other types of Mediterranean squash in the past that were much better.

This week, I put up 4 quarts of refrigerator dills and 12 pints of bread & butter pickles. It's been a real bonanza for the "Fanfare" cucumbers. These are about 8" long, dark green, warty, and 1.5-2" in diam. They are more a production cuke, with most of them coming at once. Wow. Delicious too without tough skins. Marketmores and Divas going slow.

And yesterday I put up 7 quarts of pole beans--- Rattlesnake, Hilda romano, Fortex, long beans, Blue Lake and Kentucky Wonder (this one hasn't even bloomed yet). Next year, I would like to have some shelling beans, preferably pole types, and would love some suggestions as I have no experience with these other than black-eye peas which grow exceedingly well here. They are a bear to shell when still fresh but freeze well and are a dream to eat.

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Old 01-08-2014, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Hello again!

On 8/1/2014 12:16 PM, wrote:
It is such a comfort to see your names and posts again after my long absence. I hope you are all well and enjoying your gardens and preserving.

Miraculously decent weather here in the central US has given our garden a real boost this year. The only things that never came up were the sugar-snap peas... again. We just have to find another supplier for those. The zucchini type squashes got off to a somewhat rocky start due to those darn squash bugs. But we finally won out by meticulously hand picking them. Ugh, how I hate that. They were even laying their eggs on the underside of the row-cover (Agribon) we use, so I had to scrape them off into a jar of soapy water. More on the undersides of the leaves. Lots of spiders; I think they eat some of the eggs or nymphs. Anyway, we use the row cover to tent earliest plantings of cukes and zucchini. Lashing bamboo poles, the DH builds a 4' high x 4' wide box and drapes the entire affair with a lightweight Agribon, down the entire 4' w. row. This helps to minimize the bugs and then later protects the plants from burning in the hot, mid-summer sun. Once the squash bugs are under contro

l, we roll up the sides and just leave the top covered. We do not cover later plantings.

So far, the Ravens have done best this year. We planted Barq (lt. green) as well but these were very weird because at a thick enough diameter to pick, they are only about 4 or 5 inches long. They look kind of like green goose eggs. We had other types of Mediterranean squash in the past that were much better.

This week, I put up 4 quarts of refrigerator dills and 12 pints of bread & butter pickles. It's been a real bonanza for the "Fanfare" cucumbers. These are about 8" long, dark green, warty, and 1.5-2" in diam. They are more a production cuke, with most of them coming at once. Wow. Delicious too without tough skins. Marketmores and Divas going slow.

And yesterday I put up 7 quarts of pole beans--- Rattlesnake, Hilda romano, Fortex, long beans, Blue Lake and Kentucky Wonder (this one hasn't even bloomed yet). Next year, I would like to have some shelling beans, preferably pole types, and would love some suggestions as I have no experience with these other than black-eye peas which grow exceedingly well here. They are a bear to shell when still fresh but freeze well and are a dream to eat.

Crowder peas grow well anywhere blackeyes do. I prefer the brown
crowder. They are climbers so netting or string is a must do.

Sounds like you're getting some good crops irregardless of the squash
borers. Those critters finally did in our squash. Our zucchinis this
year only produced one or two zukes per plant but the things were huge,
over two lbs in most cases and without seeds they grew so fast. We were
lucky in that, early in the season, we got lots of rain days, generally
one to two inches per day of those.

We grew Louisiana Long Green, American Beauty, and Ichiban eggplant this
year. The freezer is full of eggplant fritters and the plants are doing
well. We have grown Louisiana Long Green and Ichiban for over twenty
years and, in most years, they are heavy producers. This is our first
year for American Beauty, a globular eggplant, and it is also a heavy
producer. Luckily we have children and grandchildren nearby who like
eggplant.

Our sweet chiles have done well for us this year, we've chopped, frozen,
and bagged over thirty quart bags for later use. Now that the heavy heat
is hitting us the chiles aren't doing as well. Herbs are still growing
wildly and we've made multiple batches of basil pesto and frozen them
and have dehydrated and bagged lots of flat leaf parsley, oregano,
thyme, leaf celery, and other herbs for later use and for gifts to
family and friends.

It's good to see folks posting here again.

George
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:39 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Hello again!

On Friday, August 1, 2014 1:19:20 PM UTC-5, George Shirley wrote:

Crowder peas grow well anywhere blackeyes do. I prefer the brown
crowder. They are climbers so netting or string is a must do.

Ah ha.. I will share that with the DH, thank you. I was also thinking about cannellini and maybe Italian butter beans. I'll have to see if there are any pole type shelling beans.

Sounds like you're getting some good crops irregardless of the squash

borers. Those critters finally did in our squash.


We had those too--- both the bugs and the borers (which require a "surgical" intervention). DH tries to plant the runner type zukes so that he can root a runner if he has to cut into the base of a bore "infected" vine. I help with the bugs but the borers are out of my league. Ewww. Not enough zucchini to preserve but I did make a big batch of zucchini fritters.

We grew Louisiana Long Green, American Beauty, and Ichiban eggplant this

year. The freezer is full of eggplant fritters and the plants are doing

well. We have grown Louisiana Long Green and Ichiban for over twenty

years and, in most years, they are heavy producers. This is our first

year for American Beauty, a globular eggplant, and it is also a heavy

producer. Luckily we have children and grandchildren nearby who like

eggplant.


Eggplant grows so well here, especially the green ones, that it is a shame we can't seem to develop a taste for them. Never tried fritters though, so that is a possibility.

Our sweet chiles have done well for us this year, we've chopped, frozen,

and bagged over thirty quart bags for later use. Now that the heavy heat

is hitting us the chiles aren't doing as well.


My God that is a lot of chiles. We like sweet chiles too since we do not tolerate heat as well as we used to. It's hell to get old my grandmother used to say. I had a couple "Sweet Things" on my sandwich for lunch. Some of the mild chiles, like mild jalapenos for instance, lose some of the flavor with the reduction in heat. But other chiles like Sweet Things retain a wonderful chile flavor. Which ones do you like, George? I am always on the hunt for new ones. Regards

Isabella

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Old 01-08-2014, 11:18 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Hello again!

On 8/1/2014 4:39 PM, Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
On Friday, August 1, 2014 1:19:20 PM UTC-5, George Shirley wrote:

Crowder peas grow well anywhere blackeyes do. I prefer the brown
crowder. They are climbers so netting or string is a must do.

Ah ha.. I will share that with the DH, thank you. I was also thinking about cannellini and maybe Italian butter beans. I'll have to see if there are any pole type shelling beans.

Sounds like you're getting some good crops irregardless of the squash

borers. Those critters finally did in our squash.


We had those too--- both the bugs and the borers (which require a "surgical" intervention). DH tries to plant the runner type zukes so that he can root a runner if he has to cut into the base of a bore "infected" vine. I help with the bugs but the borers are out of my league. Ewww. Not enough zucchini to preserve but I did make a big batch of zucchini fritters.

We grew Louisiana Long Green, American Beauty, and Ichiban eggplant this

year. The freezer is full of eggplant fritters and the plants are doing

well. We have grown Louisiana Long Green and Ichiban for over twenty

years and, in most years, they are heavy producers. This is our first

year for American Beauty, a globular eggplant, and it is also a heavy

producer. Luckily we have children and grandchildren nearby who like

eggplant.


Eggplant grows so well here, especially the green ones, that it is a shame we can't seem to develop a taste for them. Never tried fritters though, so that is a possibility.


We also make french fried eggplant frequently. Whip up some egg and
milk, dip the slices into that and then shake in a bag holding flour,
corn meal, a bit of pepper, and, my favorite, powdered chipotle. Pan fry
or deep fry.

Our sweet chiles have done well for us this year, we've chopped, frozen,

and bagged over thirty quart bags for later use. Now that the heavy heat

is hitting us the chiles aren't doing as well.


My God that is a lot of chiles. We like sweet chiles too since we do not tolerate heat as well as we used to. It's hell to get old my grandmother used to say. I had a couple "Sweet Things" on my sandwich for lunch. Some of the mild chiles, like mild jalapenos for instance, lose some of the flavor with the reduction in heat. But other chiles like Sweet Things retain a wonderful chile flavor. Which ones do you like, George? I am always on the hunt for new ones. Regards

Isabella


I used to eat a lot of hot chiles but, as my stomach aged, I was not
feeling so good afterward. Used to make my own fermented hot sauce. Sent
a bottle to Barb Schaller years ago, waited several months, asked her
what she thought of it. Told me that they left bottle open all winter
and it heated the house. Most of the chiles we freeze and bag go into
various types of food. Omelets, stews, soups, gumbo, pretty much
anything cooked. Gives us a bit more vegetable taste plus a good bit of
vitamin C. If I remember correctly we only have about eight or ten chile
plants. Age may be a part of not eating hot chiles anymore, I will be 75
next month. Since I have a birthday party once every 25 years the family
is likely to whoop it up. Can hardly wait for 100. G

George


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