FoodBanter.com

FoodBanter.com (https://www.foodbanter.com/)
-   Preserving (https://www.foodbanter.com/preserving/)
-   -   Oregano (https://www.foodbanter.com/preserving/417788-oregano.html)

The Cook 19-05-2012 10:24 PM

Oregano
 
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

George Shirley[_2_] 19-05-2012 10:45 PM

Oregano
 
On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.

I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant

Chemiker 20-05-2012 02:00 AM

Oregano
 
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."


George, you talk of "leaf celery". There is a plant, common in Europe,
that tastes just like celery (maybe a little more robust), and it's
commonly referred to as Chinese Celery, but locals have their own
names for it. In Hungary it's called Ujzeller (new celery). Grown for
leaves with insignificant stalks. Could this be what you're growing?

What is your Zone? I'm on the Gulf Coast, so it's in the 7-8-9 range.

Also, rosemary of the R. prostata variant grows as a ground cover,
broad and flat. Flavor's OK, but not as aromatic as the Tuscan Blue
and its brethren. Hint: Rosemary makes a neat bonsai, which means it
can be grown in pots. I have 4 plants of different cultivars, all
"erecta" and I let them grow at will. Come Christmas, there are
Rosemary wreathes about the house (they make neat gifts, too).

when roasting chicken, rosemary shoots (leaves and all) insereted
under the skin. Lamb chops, cut a handful of Rosemary branches and
beat the chops.
Add rosemary to an incense burner. I think it's part of church
incense. Smells like it anyway. rosemary thrown in the bottom of your
dirty clothes hamper. Cut rosemary twigs for kebab skewers.

Rosemary loves being pruned. Enjoy what nature has given you. It takes
trimming gladly and will thank you for it.

HTH

Alex

Gloria P 20-05-2012 03:59 AM

Oregano
 
On 5/19/2012 7:00 PM, Chemiker wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary?


But the big, bushy plant is so gorgeous when it is covered in the tiny
blue flowers if you let it bloom!


celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."


George, you talk of "leaf celery". There is a plant, common in Europe,
that tastes just like celery (maybe a little more robust), and it's
commonly referred to as Chinese Celery, but locals have their own
names for it. In Hungary it's called Ujzeller (new celery). Grown for
leaves with insignificant stalks. Could this be what you're growing?


I wondered about that, too. I grow lovage, which looks exactly like
celery leaves on a short, rounded stem (actually not so short by the end
of the season, over 6 ft. tall.) It tastes exactly like celery,
but bit stronger. Very good in salads or soup.

gloria p


George Shirley[_2_] 20-05-2012 01:16 PM

Oregano
 
On 5/19/2012 8:00 PM, Chemiker wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."


George, you talk of "leaf celery". There is a plant, common in Europe,
that tastes just like celery (maybe a little more robust), and it's
commonly referred to as Chinese Celery, but locals have their own
names for it. In Hungary it's called Ujzeller (new celery). Grown for
leaves with insignificant stalks. Could this be what you're growing?

Most likely.

What is your Zone? I'm on the Gulf Coast, so it's in the 7-8-9 range.

USDA zone 9b, SW Louisiana. When and if we move back to Texas we will be
in the same zone in Harris County.

Also, rosemary of the R. prostata variant grows as a ground cover,
broad and flat. Flavor's OK, but not as aromatic as the Tuscan Blue
and its brethren. Hint: Rosemary makes a neat bonsai, which means it
can be grown in pots. I have 4 plants of different cultivars, all
"erecta" and I let them grow at will. Come Christmas, there are
Rosemary wreathes about the house (they make neat gifts, too).


My lovely wife insisted on planting the rosemary in the middle of my
herb garden. The [email protected]@#$% stuff is taking over. Ripped out the first one
and darned if she didn't get a new one. I don't care for rosemary, grew
up in a pine forest and the stuff tastes very similar. I use it for
chicken and other fowl but sparingly.

when roasting chicken, rosemary shoots (leaves and all) insereted
under the skin. Lamb chops, cut a handful of Rosemary branches and
beat the chops.
Add rosemary to an incense burner. I think it's part of church
incense. Smells like it anyway. rosemary thrown in the bottom of your
dirty clothes hamper. Cut rosemary twigs for kebab skewers.

Rosemary loves being pruned. Enjoy what nature has given you. It takes
trimming gladly and will thank you for it.

HTH

Alex



George Shirley[_2_] 20-05-2012 01:18 PM

Oregano
 
On 5/19/2012 9:59 PM, gloria p wrote:
On 5/19/2012 7:00 PM, Chemiker wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary?


But the big, bushy plant is so gorgeous when it is covered in the tiny
blue flowers if you let it bloom!


celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."


George, you talk of "leaf celery". There is a plant, common in Europe,
that tastes just like celery (maybe a little more robust), and it's
commonly referred to as Chinese Celery, but locals have their own
names for it. In Hungary it's called Ujzeller (new celery). Grown for
leaves with insignificant stalks. Could this be what you're growing?


I wondered about that, too. I grow lovage, which looks exactly like
celery leaves on a short, rounded stem (actually not so short by the end
of the season, over 6 ft. tall.) It tastes exactly like celery,
but bit stronger. Very good in salads or soup.

gloria p

I've also grown lovage, doesn't do well in my climate. Different taste
and growth patterns from the leaf celery I grow, at least tastes
different to me.

Doug Freyburger 20-05-2012 03:18 PM

Oregano
 
George Shirley wrote:

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon.


In Chicago metro when we still had a house with a back yard each fall
we'd transfer the herbs from the pots on the deck to the garden in the
back to see what would survive. The lemon thyme did great until a
couple of years later the tarragon did so well it kudzu'd over the thyme
and a few of the decoratives in its vicinity. Then it stabilized
maxxing out at 4-5 foot diameter before the winter trimmed it back. If
it's still there under the new owners I bet it will be gigantic this
year.

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.


Now that we only have a few pots on a deck I'm interested in perennial
veggies. Not easy to find. Scratch rhubarb as my wife's allergic.
Scratch asparagus as it takes too much dirt to fit in a pot. That
leaves very obscure ones like "sea kale" that I can't find in shops.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary?


We used to live in Los Angeles metro. There they plant rosemary along
the freeways. They don't water or food it. Every so often a car goes
off the road and the rosemerry forrest absorbs and eats the minerals
from the car. Semi-arid kudzu.

Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."


Gloria P mentioned lovage as an herb that tastes like celery. It grows
well in Chicago's climate. The year we grew it it produced many times
the amount of celery flavor we could handle.

The Cook 20-05-2012 04:04 PM

Oregano
 
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.

I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant



Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

Chemiker 21-05-2012 03:23 AM

Oregano
 
On Sun, 20 May 2012 11:04:52 -0400, The Cook
wrote:

On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.

I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant



Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.


fwiw: we have asian stores here and they sell the seeds close to the
checkout lanes.

Alec\x

George Shirley[_2_] 21-05-2012 03:24 PM

Oregano
 
On 5/20/2012 10:04 AM, The Cook wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.

I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant



Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.

I think I got it from Johnny's Seeds, they should have an online
presence. If not just do a Google on "leaf celery" may be someone near
you has it.

The Cook 21-05-2012 03:42 PM

Oregano
 
On Sun, 20 May 2012 11:04:52 -0400, The Cook
wrote:

On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.

I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant



Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.


Just checked my listing of seeds and discovered that I should have
some for cutting celery. When I saw where I got it I started looking
more closely for their packages and found mine.

Mine came from superseeds.com. Their shipping rates are pretty
reasonable. They also have a good selection of out of the ordinary
seeds.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

Storrmmee 21-05-2012 05:36 PM

Oregano
 
my question is does it contain less salt than regular celery? Lee

who is working out the lower salt food plan for the dh
"George Shirley" wrote in message
. com...
On 5/20/2012 10:04 AM, The Cook wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.
I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant



Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.

I think I got it from Johnny's Seeds, they should have an online presence.
If not just do a Google on "leaf celery" may be someone near you has it.




The Cook 21-05-2012 07:01 PM

Oregano
 
On Mon, 21 May 2012 11:36:47 -0500, "Storrmmee"
wrote:

my question is does it contain less salt than regular celery? Lee

who is working out the lower salt food plan for the dh


Cutting celery (afina) looks like parsley so I would suppose that you
would use it in the same quantities as parsley. It is not stalks.








"George Shirley" wrote in message
.com...
On 5/20/2012 10:04 AM, The Cook wrote:
On Sat, 19 May 2012 16:45:42 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 5/19/2012 4:24 PM, The Cook wrote:
I now have 16 American Harvest trays of oregano drying. I am drying
it on the stems. Much easier than trying to get it off the stem
before drying. This is just ordinary oregano.

I have another plant which is supposed to be Greek oregano. Will do
it as soon as this stuff finished. Actually almost all of my
perennial herbs need to be cut and preserved somehow. My thyme plant
is huge going over the side of the raised bed. Nice to see something
really producing.
I've found that most of the oregano seedlings sold around here are the
Spanish ones. Spanish oregano is what you find in containers in most
grocers shelves in the US. The Greek I purchased some years ago is a bit
more hardy during drought but both taste the same to both of us.

I have always dried oregano on the stem, when dry just run a stem
through your fingers and the dried leaves fall into a container. I store
them in a dark colored container inside a cabinet, take out what I need
for a month or so of cooking, run it through the spice grinder and then
into a smaller container that goes in the spice cabinet beside the
stove. Do the same with basil.

I've never been able to keep thyme over a season, generally our very hot
summers knocks it down. Same with tarragon. For tarragon taste I grow
Mexican Mint Marigold, grows prolifically in my climate and makes a lot.
Actually I have to pull three fourths of the bed every year or it takes
over the herb garden. I end having to buy thyme at the market

I also grow New Zealand spinach, seeds easily found on the net. Not an
herb or a spice but a vegetable. Reseeds readily and heavily. First
green plant of the year to bear in early spring. Leaves are fleshy and
fairly tasty as a cooked green. I dehydrate a lot of the stuff and keep
it handy to thicken stews and soups. Dump in a handful and it also adds
flavor and some vegetable taste to soups and stews.

Anyone need any bay leaves? Our bay tree has outdone itself this year,
four new trunks, grows like a bush. Is actually noble laurel, lots of
the trees are grown in Louisiana for the bay leaf market. A lot of the
gumbo file you buy comes from Louisiana too. We never buy any of it
because we have a fifteen feet tall sassafras tree in the backyard. Go
out and pick a bunch of leaves in mid-summer, dehydrate them, run them
through the spice grinder, store in a sealed jar and keep in the dark,
lasts forever.

We also have problems with rosemary, the dratted bush will grow four
feet high and around in one season. Who needs that much rosemary? Dill
readily reseeds here so we always have plenty. I grow fernleaf dill to
put in dill pickles, to me it has a stronger taste than the seeds. Lost
my leaf celery to drought last year. Waiting until we move to buy more
seed. One of the handiest plants we've ever grown. Don't have to buy a
stalk of celery that will go bad before we can use it up. The leaf
celery can be cut fresh and added to salads and whatever is cooking and
gives it a good flavor. Sometimes known as "cutting celery."

Sounds like your season is underway Susan. We've been putting up green
beans and such for a month or more now. Picked a tomato Friday that
weighed about half a pound, turned it into bacon, lettuce, and tomato
sandwiches. Tomato and lettuce from our garden, bacon from the store,
home made bread, tasty, tasty. Lettuce is bolting so no more home grown
until fall.

George, getting ready to grill a ribeye, some yellow squash and a couple
of Japanese eggplant


Where do you get your leaf celery seeds? I had some several years ago
and I no longer remember where I got it. Hope it is somewhere that
has other seeds I need or want. Postage on a single package of seed
is not worth it.

I think I got it from Johnny's Seeds, they should have an online presence.
If not just do a Google on "leaf celery" may be someone near you has it.


--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

George Shirley[_2_] 21-05-2012 07:25 PM

Oregano
 
On 5/21/2012 11:36 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
my question is does it contain less salt than regular celery? Lee

who is working out the lower salt food plan for the dh


Salt content on home grown vegetables is going to depend upon the amount
of salt in your soil Lee. Plants don't make salt, just absorb it, at
least that's what I learned in one course in agriculture a thousand
years ago. Herbivores eat vegetation that has absorbed salt, then are
eaten by carnivores who get their salt from the herbivores. We eat both
of them so much of our salt intake comes from eating meat and vegetables
grown on soil with salt in it.

I've been off salt for about 25 years, never salt the food I'm cooking
or eating and read the labels on everything packaged.

We don't have much salt in our soil here according to tests we've run,
and the geologists tell me that 50K years ago our soil was at the bottom
of the Gulf of Mexico. Lots of rain tends to leech the salt out and take
it down deeper.

How did you find out how much salt was in the celery you were buying, or
was it home grown?

Storrmmee 21-05-2012 08:38 PM

Oregano
 
let me try again i accidentally emailled instead of posting.

i read an article years ago about the large amount of salt that is naturally
occurring in celery, then on another group a woman posted a link i no longer
have about it when her water retention went way up... like broccoli which
has a large amount of whatever it is that is used to make aspirine, Lee
"George Shirley" wrote in message
. com...
On 5/21/2012 11:36 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
my question is does it contain less salt than regular celery? Lee

who is working out the lower salt food plan for the dh


Salt content on home grown vegetables is going to depend upon the amount
of salt in your soil Lee. Plants don't make salt, just absorb it, at least
that's what I learned in one course in agriculture a thousand years ago.
Herbivores eat vegetation that has absorbed salt, then are eaten by
carnivores who get their salt from the herbivores. We eat both of them so
much of our salt intake comes from eating meat and vegetables grown on
soil with salt in it.

I've been off salt for about 25 years, never salt the food I'm cooking or
eating and read the labels on everything packaged.

We don't have much salt in our soil here according to tests we've run, and
the geologists tell me that 50K years ago our soil was at the bottom of
the Gulf of Mexico. Lots of rain tends to leech the salt out and take it
down deeper.

How did you find out how much salt was in the celery you were buying, or
was it home grown?





All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FoodBanter