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Mike Ruskai 15-07-2004 05:13 PM

Jar supply?
 
We have a small farm (or large garden, depending on how you scale things)
from which we sell tomatoes, peppers, and a few other things.

Last year, most of the unsold tomatoes and peppers from any given picking
were converted into salsa (good salsa). All told, in three separate
batches of varying sizes, we made something like three or four gallons.
It was all consumed by friends and family. There are quite a few more
tomato and pepper plants this year, and the thought occurred to try
selling some salsa made from the leftovers.

The biggest issue at this point is the container. Last year, all the
salsa was canned in mason jars after a hot water bath (20 minutes, I
believe). After doing some reading, I realize that to do only a hot water
bath for something to be sold requires that the overall pH be not higher
than 4.6. I think it's likely that level of acidity was easily reached
(no sample from last year left to test), but just the same, I'm going to
need a container that can handle pressure canning if it's required.

Selling it in mason jars would be a bit costly. I was thinking something
more like the thinner jars the store-bought salsa is sold in, with the
one-piece sealing lids.

Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


--
- Mike

Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.



Brian Mailman 15-07-2004 05:52 PM

Jar supply?
 
Mike Ruskai wrote:

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


Check with your local health department or equivalent and see what they
require for commercial sales both in terms of equipment and
environment. You may find you need to redo your kitchen if there's
things like no flashing or wipeable tile behind the stove...

B/

Brian Mailman 15-07-2004 05:52 PM

Jar supply?
 
Mike Ruskai wrote:

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


Check with your local health department or equivalent and see what they
require for commercial sales both in terms of equipment and
environment. You may find you need to redo your kitchen if there's
things like no flashing or wipeable tile behind the stove...

B/

zxcvbob 15-07-2004 06:14 PM

Jar supply?
 
Mike Ruskai wrote:
We have a small farm (or large garden, depending on how you scale things)
from which we sell tomatoes, peppers, and a few other things.

Last year, most of the unsold tomatoes and peppers from any given picking
were converted into salsa (good salsa). All told, in three separate
batches of varying sizes, we made something like three or four gallons.
It was all consumed by friends and family. There are quite a few more
tomato and pepper plants this year, and the thought occurred to try
selling some salsa made from the leftovers.

The biggest issue at this point is the container. Last year, all the
salsa was canned in mason jars after a hot water bath (20 minutes, I
believe). After doing some reading, I realize that to do only a hot water
bath for something to be sold requires that the overall pH be not higher
than 4.6. I think it's likely that level of acidity was easily reached
(no sample from last year left to test), but just the same, I'm going to
need a container that can handle pressure canning if it's required.

Selling it in mason jars would be a bit costly. I was thinking something
more like the thinner jars the store-bought salsa is sold in, with the
one-piece sealing lids.

Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


--
- Mike

Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.



Your biggest issue is not containers, it is health permits, or maybe
product liability insurance.

Pressure canning is easier on the jars (in my opinion) than BWB canner.
I have never broken a mayonnaise jar or a mason jar in the pressure
canner. I have broken a very few mason jars in a BWB canner.

If you search, you can find 1-piece lids for mason jars that can be heat
processed. My father got a bunch of them from a bee keeper, and I've
used them for BWB jams and jelly and they work well and look nice.

You might try charging a 50 deposit on reusable jars.

This is not really an appropriate forum for discussing commercial
canning ventures. A couple of the "regulars" here do sell stuff and
they may offer you some help via email if they can figure out your email
address.

Good luck, and best regards,
Bob

zxcvbob 15-07-2004 06:14 PM

Jar supply?
 
Mike Ruskai wrote:
We have a small farm (or large garden, depending on how you scale things)
from which we sell tomatoes, peppers, and a few other things.

Last year, most of the unsold tomatoes and peppers from any given picking
were converted into salsa (good salsa). All told, in three separate
batches of varying sizes, we made something like three or four gallons.
It was all consumed by friends and family. There are quite a few more
tomato and pepper plants this year, and the thought occurred to try
selling some salsa made from the leftovers.

The biggest issue at this point is the container. Last year, all the
salsa was canned in mason jars after a hot water bath (20 minutes, I
believe). After doing some reading, I realize that to do only a hot water
bath for something to be sold requires that the overall pH be not higher
than 4.6. I think it's likely that level of acidity was easily reached
(no sample from last year left to test), but just the same, I'm going to
need a container that can handle pressure canning if it's required.

Selling it in mason jars would be a bit costly. I was thinking something
more like the thinner jars the store-bought salsa is sold in, with the
one-piece sealing lids.

Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


--
- Mike

Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.



Your biggest issue is not containers, it is health permits, or maybe
product liability insurance.

Pressure canning is easier on the jars (in my opinion) than BWB canner.
I have never broken a mayonnaise jar or a mason jar in the pressure
canner. I have broken a very few mason jars in a BWB canner.

If you search, you can find 1-piece lids for mason jars that can be heat
processed. My father got a bunch of them from a bee keeper, and I've
used them for BWB jams and jelly and they work well and look nice.

You might try charging a 50 deposit on reusable jars.

This is not really an appropriate forum for discussing commercial
canning ventures. A couple of the "regulars" here do sell stuff and
they may offer you some help via email if they can figure out your email
address.

Good luck, and best regards,
Bob

Gary S. 15-07-2004 06:34 PM

Jar supply?
 
On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 16:13:06 GMT, "Mike Ruskai"
wrote:

Selling it in mason jars would be a bit costly. I was thinking something
more like the thinner jars the store-bought salsa is sold in, with the
one-piece sealing lids.

Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


Some states have business development programs where they help people
start home-based businesses, many of which involve cooked foods or
similar.

I know Vermont has a very well developed program, and Maine. You might
check around with your state, as they can help you with all sorts of
information on meeting health standards, and suppliers of materials
like jars.

See for a start: http://www.vtsbdc.org/

Many people like you, have gone from doing foods as gifts for friends
and family, to starting a small home-based business.

Happy trails,
Gary (net.yogi.bear)
------------------------------------------------
at the 51st percentile of ursine intelligence

Gary D. Schwartz, Needham, MA, USA
Please reply to: garyDOTschwartzATpoboxDOTcom

The Joneses 15-07-2004 06:42 PM

Jar supply?
 
Mike Ruskai wrote:

We have a small farm (or large garden, depending on how you scale things)
from which we sell tomatoes, peppers, and a few other things.

Last year, most of the unsold tomatoes and peppers from any given picking
were converted into salsa (good salsa). All told, in three separate
batches of varying sizes, we made something like three or four gallons.
It was all consumed by friends and family. There are quite a few more
tomato and pepper plants this year, and the thought occurred to try
selling some salsa made from the leftovers.

The biggest issue at this point is the container. Last year, all the
salsa was canned in mason jars after a hot water bath (20 minutes, I
believe). After doing some reading, I realize that to do only a hot water
bath for something to be sold requires that the overall pH be not higher
than 4.6. I think it's likely that level of acidity was easily reached
(no sample from last year left to test), but just the same, I'm going to
need a container that can handle pressure canning if it's required.

Selling it in mason jars would be a bit costly. I was thinking something
more like the thinner jars the store-bought salsa is sold in, with the
one-piece sealing lids.

Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?

--
- Mike

Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.


In our local farmer's markets, the rules are different. Home canned things are
allowed, if xxx, and when xxx. Mostly high acid foods in our local farmer's
market. Dairy, meat, low acid foods require permits. OTOH my home county
(across the state border) does not allow selling any foodstuffs from a home.
Again the farmer's market rules are different out on the Rez. I have a link
for one-use bottles from Sunburst Bottle Company (.com) but the price is very
similar to Walmart, what with shipping an' all. Big Lots has cheaper mason
jars, but maybe not the size or shape you like. Best of luck. (ya ever try
to grow and pickle asparagus, boy what a treat!)
Edrena




Melba's Jammin' 15-07-2004 07:41 PM

Jar supply?
 
In article
thlink.net, "Mike
Ruskai" wrote:

We have a small farm (or large garden, depending on how you scale things)
from which we sell tomatoes, peppers, and a few other things.


Are there jars of this nature available that can be canned in a normal pot
or pressure canner? If so, where might one purchase them?

Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?


--
- Mike

Remove 'spambegone.net' and reverse to send e-mail.


Google is your friend. Search for jars and bottles.
Email . She'll be glad to answer your
questions and send you a sample.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 7/4/04.


robin 16-07-2004 02:11 AM

Jar supply?
 
This is a VERY good suggestion. Years ago a friend decided to make and
sell food products from home (candy, james, etc). Where she lived the
health department required her to have a completely separate kitchen for
this purpose. There a definite legal ramifications if they find out you
don't follow regulations. Just my two cents worth.
Hope it goes well for you - my friend has been quite successful in her
venture.

Robin

Brian Mailman wrote:
Mike Ruskai wrote:


Any other tips on what I appear not to have thought of?



Check with your local health department or equivalent and see what they
require for commercial sales both in terms of equipment and
environment. You may find you need to redo your kitchen if there's
things like no flashing or wipeable tile behind the stove...

B/




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