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Old Magic1
 
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Default Appetizers celebrate Cinco de Mayo By Miriam Rubin

Appetizers celebrate Cinco de Mayo
Thursday, April 28, 2005

By Miriam Rubin

Cinco de Mayo is a celebration of Mexican independence, but don't confuse it
with Mexican Independence Day.

Stacy Innerst, Post-Gazette

Cinco De Mayo is just one reason to taste Tequila
About avocados
Mmm, guacamole
Match Mexican dish with a Mexican drink

Cinco de Mayo commemorates the victory of the Mexican Army in the Battle of
Puebla fought, of course, on May 5, in the year 1862. In that battle, the
Mexican army, though greatly outnumbered, defeated the invading French
forces of Napoleon III.

Such a victory, won against all odds, calls for a fiesta and Cinco de Mayo
offers the occasion: It's party time.

In Puebla and throughout Mexico, and in the United States, people celebrate
Cinco de Mayo with parades, festivals, speeches and dances. It's a day for
heralding pride and spirit in Mexican heritage. And whether or not you are
of Mexican descent, you can toast the culture of our neighbor to the south
with your own Cinco de Mayo fiesta.

To help you put together a delicious -- and easy -- Cinco de Mayo feast
we've gathered a collection of Mexican snacks or small dishes, called
botanas.

They're cheesy, spicy, crispy, crunchy and creamy and you could make all of
them, or just a few. Filling and ample, these go well with beer or
margaritas, and we offer some suggestions about the libations, too.

You'll want to have some warmed flour or corn tortillas for scooping up the
Hongos con Queso (Mushrooms with Melted Cheese) and the guacamole.

Warm tortillas in a dry skillet, or wrap a stack with aluminum foil and heat
about 10 minutes in a 350-degree oven, or heat in the microwave, following
package directions. Keep the warm tortillas in a covered basket and warm
only small batches.

Get some good store-bought chips for the guacamole and the salsa. Look in
the organic section of the supermarket or check out the selection at Whole
Foods. If you see any Mexican limes, snag those and cut into wedges for
squeezing over just about anything.

If you make all the botanas, you'll have enough for 6 to 8 or a couple more
good eaters. If you're expecting more guests, double some of the recipes,
maybe the guacamole and the Hongos con Queso.

The Cheese Crisps and Quesadillas de Aguacate (avocado) should be served
piping hot, as soon as they're made. Make a batch when guests arrive, then
another in the middle of the party. If you have your ingredients ready
(basically just shredded cheese), these recipes go together quickly.


Robin Rombach, Post-Gazette
Shrimp & Tomato Tequila Cocktail Salsa is a fresh way to serve shrimp
cocktail.

To put a sweet ending to your party, serve a platter of chilled fresh
pineapple chunks, lightly dusted with cinnamon and sliced strawberries,
macerated in a touch of tequila, lime juice and sugar. A platter of bakery
butter cookies or biscotti would be a lovely accompaniment to the fruit.

So go on, what are you waiting for? Invite some friends over on May 5 for
Cinco de Mayo -- it's just around the corner.

Mexico's true Independence Day is Sept. 16 -- when we can party all over
again.



Shrimp & Tomato Tequila Cocktail Salsa


We adapted this recipe from fabulous foods.com to serve the group, but it
looks lovely served individually in margarita glasses.


4 large tomatoes, chopped

1 jalapeno pepper, seeded, finely chopped (about 1 tablespoon)

1 tablespoon grated lime zest

3/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 tablespoons tequila

2 tablespoons lime juice

1 tablespoon orange-flavored liqueur (optional)

1 1/2 pounds cooked large or jumbo shrimp

In a small bowl, combine tomatoes, jalapeno, lime zest, salt, pepper,
tequila, lime juice and liqueur until blended. (We served it on the side as
a dip for the shrimp.) Or spoon an equal amount of the tomato salsa into 6
margarita or wine glasses. Surround with chilled shrimp, dividing evenly.
Garnish with lemon wedges or cilantro sprigs.
************************************************** ************

Tostada Grande con Queso (Cheese Crisps)


An easy and delicious recipe from Marilyn Tausend's "Cocina de la Familia."
These must be eaten right away, so only make one or two at a time. Double or
triple the recipe for a crowd. Tausend lists optional toppings: chopped
tomato, olives, cilantro, cooked, crumbled chorizo, but she likes her crisps
with a spoonful of guacamole and a shake of hot pepper flakes. The choice is
yours.


1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

1 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Two 12-inch flour tortillas

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix cheeses.

Place tortillas directly on oven rack and bake until they start to puff up
and become crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Pull out oven rack, sprinkle tortillas
with cheeses and push oven rack in. Bake until cheese melts, 4 to 5 minutes
more.

Transfer to large plate or cutting board. Cut into wedges to serve.

Makes 3 or 4 appetizer servings.
*************************************************

Guacamole


Creamy and very lush, guacamole is best enjoyed right after it's prepared.


1 ripe medium tomato, finely chopped

2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion

1 jalapeno or Serrano chili, finely chopped (leave in seeds for heat)

3 ripe Hass avocados, halved and pitted

1/4 to 1/2 cup lightly packed finely chopped cilantro

1 to 2 tablespoons lime or lemon juice, or more to taste

Salt to taste

In large bowl, put tomato, onion and chile; mash a bit, leaving it chunky.
Spoon in avocado pulp. Mash with fork or potato masher to coarse texture.
Stir in lime juice, cilantro and salt to taste. Serve right away.

Makes about 2 1/2 cups.

Adapted from "Cocina de la Familia," by Marilyn Tausend
********************************************


Hongos con Queso (Mushrooms with Melted Cheese)


Hot, melted cheese is served for botanas throughout Mexico. You eat it by
scooping or spooning up bits of the cheese onto warm tortillas. This recipe
goes a little further, adding sautéed mushrooms. For ease, assemble it a few
hours ahead but don't bake. Cover and refrigerate until needed. For a crowd,
you'll want to make two.


1 tablespoon canola oil

1/2 cup chopped white onion

1/2 pound thinly sliced white button or exotic mushrooms

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Brush a shallow 9-inch gratin or ovenproof dish
or pie plate with oil (don't use cooking spray).

In medium skillet, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook
until tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Add mushrooms, oregano, salt and pepper; mix
well. Cook, stirring often, until mushrooms are tender and all moisture has
evaporated, 4 minutes.


Spread mushrooms evenly in prepared dish. Sprinkle evenly with cheese. Bake
until cheese is melted and bubbly, 6 to 8 minutes. Serve at once with warm
tortillas or chips.

Makes 4 appetizer servings.

Adapted from "1,000 Mexican Recipes," by Marge Poore
********************************************


Quesadillas de Aguacate (Avocado Quesadillas)


Filled with a gorgeous mixture of mashed avocado and melted cheese, these
are fabulous, so make extras. Because avocado gets bitter upon heating,
serve these right away, instead of trying to keep them warm, and don't
overheat them; a little is enough. Serve with Salsa Fresca.


1 large ripe Hass avocado, halved and pitted

2 to 4 tablespoons chopped white onion

2 to 3 teaspoons fresh lime juice

4 to 6 dashes Tabasco, or more to taste

1/8 teaspoon salt

8 7-inch flour tortillas

2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Canola oil

Scoop avocado pulp into a medium bowl and mash. Mix in onion, lime juice,
Tabasco and salt.

Arrange 4 tortillas on work surface. Spread each with 1/4 of the avocado,
leaving a 1/2-inch border. Sprinkle each with 1/4 of the cheese. Top each
with another tortilla, pressing down firmly. Brush with some oil.

Brush large nonstick skillet with oil and heat over medium heat. Invert one
filled tortilla into pan, oiled side down. Brush top side with oil. Cook
until underside is light brown and crisp. Turn with a spatula; and brown
second side. Repeat with remainder. Cut into wedges to serve.

Makes 16 wedges, 4 to 6 appetizer servings.

Adapted from "1,000 Mexican Recipes," by Marge Poore
********************************************

Salsa Fresca


Use ripe tomatoes for this sauce, found on the tabletops of most Mexican
restaurants. Marilyn Tausend likes to hand-chop everything for the best
texture. The salsa should be used within a few hours. Otherwise, saute it in
a little oil and use as a cooked salsa. It's delicious on eggs and grilled
chicken.


1 pound ripe tomatoes (about 2 large), cut in 1/4-inch pieces

1/3 cup finely chopped scallions

1/4 cup loosely packed chopped fresh cilantro

2 to 3 fresh jalapeno or Serrano chiles, seeded if you like, minced

1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

Pinch ground cumin

1 to 2 tablespoons, or more, fresh lime juice

Salt to taste

In large bowl, mix tomatoes, scallions and cilantro. Add chilies a little at
a time, to taste. Add oregano, cumin, lime juice and salt to taste. If salsa
is dry, add a tablespoon of water. Cover and let stand for 30 minutes to
blend flavors.

Makes about 2 1/4 cups.

Adapted from "Cocina de la Familia," by Marilyn Tausend
********************************************

Spicy Roasted Potatoes


Serve with sour cream, guacamole or salsa, or all three. You could roast
these ahead of time and reheat to serve. Leftovers are great cold in a salad
with avocado, baby greens and bits of smoked salmon or bacon.


1 1/2 pounds (1 bag) small new potatoes (white, red or Yukon Gold), scrubbed
and patted dry

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (we liked it best with the larger amount)

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed with flat side of chef's knife

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Lightly oil a rimmed baking sheet.

If potatoes are larger than 1 inch, cut in half. In large bowl, mix oil,
oregano, salt, cayenne and black peppers and garlic. Add potatoes; toss to
coat. Arrange potatoes cut-side down on prepared baking sheet. Discard
garlic; scrape any remaining oil over potatoes.

Roast, turning once or twice, until tender and lightly browned, about 30
minutes. Serve hot with toothpicks.

Makes 6 or more appetizer servings.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05118/495346.stm

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
(Miriam Rubin is a Greene County food writer.)


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On Mon, 2 May 2005 12:37:43 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:



Did you have permission from the copyright holder to use this entire
piece, o_m1?


jim

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Rolly
 
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Magic, my amigo,

You wrote "In Puebla and throughout Mexico, and in the United States,
people celebrate Cinco de Mayo..."

"AND THROUGHOUT MEXICO" just ain't true. Yes, it's a big day around
Puebla, and it's a big day in many parts of the USA. But in most of
Mexico it gets hardly a nod. In my town, nothing at all. It is odd
that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is in almost
all of Mexico.

But, do party on!

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Dimitri
 
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"Old Magic1" > wrote in message
...
> Appetizers celebrate Cinco de Mayo
> Thursday, April 28, 2005


Lime and salt is the best appetizer for Cinco de Mayo.

;-)

Dimitri


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Dimitri
 
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"Old Magic1" > wrote in message
...
> Appetizers celebrate Cinco de Mayo
> Thursday, April 28, 2005


Lime and salt is the best appetizer for Cinco de Mayo.

;-)

Dimitri




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krusty kritter
 
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Rolly wrote:

> It is odd that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is
> in almost all of Mexico.


El Drunko de Mayo seems to have gained its popularity in southern
california between 1972 and 1981 in reponse to supermarket chains
becoming aware of the commercial possibilities of exploiting the Cinco
de Mayo holiday by offering bargains on cerveza and pork butts...

I remember a Latina interviewer asking Ronald Reagan if he planned to
celebrate Cinco de Mayo at his California ranch in the hills above
Gaviota...

Ever quick to make a politically correct response, Reagan replied that
he couldn't recall a time when the Reagan family hadn't celebrated
Cinco de Mayo...

And I couldn't recall a time when anybody I knew ever had celebrated
that commercial holiday...

Is it a good idea or a bad idea to get the borrachons started on
Memorial Day weekend three weeks early?

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On Mon, 2 May 2005 12:37:43 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:

>Appetizers celebrate Cinco de Mayo
>Thursday, April 28, 2005
>
>By Miriam Rubin
>
>Cinco de Mayo is a celebration of Mexican independence, but don't confuse it
>with Mexican Independence Day.
>


snip

Perhaps, the author of the article should have checked Wilipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo


jim

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On 3 May 2005 11:08:52 -0700, "krusty kritter"
> wrote:

>
>Rolly wrote:
>
>> It is odd that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is
>> in almost all of Mexico.

>
>El Drunko de Mayo seems to have gained its popularity in southern
>california between 1972 and 1981 in reponse to supermarket chains
>becoming aware of the commercial possibilities of exploiting the Cinco
>de Mayo holiday by offering bargains on cerveza and pork butts...
>


I've posted a link elsewhere to Wikipedia on this holiday. Way back
when, the timing of the holiday made a nice partying weekend in Mexico
just before finals took place.

Collegians loved it. Mexican's ignored it until it became commercially
viable.


jim

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Old Magic1
 
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> wrote in message
...
On Mon, 2 May 2005 12:37:43 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:



Did you have permission from the copyright holder to use this entire
piece, o_m1?


jim

For Jim, the NG Police,
I am terribly sorry for costing the millions of dollars this site lost due
to my copyright infringement. Now that is all you are going to get from me
copper until I assemble my defense team. I think I can get Bobby Conkrin to
head this up so I won't loose all of my social security, just in case there
is a law suit. Since George Bush is going to get the rest, I don't have any
idea how I am going to live. You have just upset me so much, I may just have
to commit myself to a mental hospital for the criminally insane. Oh woe is
me!!! NOT, LMAO!!!
--
Old Magic 1


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Old Magic1
 
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"Old Magic1" > wrote in message
...


> wrote in message
...
On Mon, 2 May 2005 12:37:43 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:



Did you have permission from the copyright holder to use this entire
piece, o_m1?


jim

For Jim, the NG Police,
I am terribly sorry for costing the millions of dollars this site lost due
to my copyright infringement. Now that is all you are going to get from me
copper until I assemble my defense team. I think I can get Bobby Conkrin to
head this up so I won't loose all of my social security, just in case there
is a law suit. Since George Bush is going to get the rest, I don't have any
idea how I am going to live. You have just upset me so much, I may just have
to commit myself to a mental hospital for the criminally insane. Oh woe is
me!!! NOT, LMAO!!!

In case you are wondering who Bobby Conkrin is, he is the cousin of Johnny.
He didn't finish high school, but I hear he will pass his bar exam by the
time this law suit occurs.
--
Old Magic 1





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Old Magic1
 
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"Rolly" > wrote in message
ups.com...
Magic, my amigo,

You wrote "In Puebla and throughout Mexico, and in the United States,
people celebrate Cinco de Mayo..."

"AND THROUGHOUT MEXICO" just ain't true. Yes, it's a big day around
Puebla, and it's a big day in many parts of the USA. But in most of
Mexico it gets hardly a nod. In my town, nothing at all. It is odd
that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is in almost
all of Mexico.

But, do party on!

Sorry Rolly, I just come across the article and thought it would be of
interest to some here and had some nice looking appetizers. I personally
don't celebrate this holiday, I do celebrate March 2, 1836. On March 2,
1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico and became the Republic of
Texas and existed as a separate nation after kicking some Mexican butt,
Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, the leading villain of Texas history. March 2
is an official state holiday - Texas Independence Day. Each year, there are
numerous parades, festivals and even a complete historical reenactment of
the event. Of course I celebrate that little event that occurred back in
1776 also.
--
Old Magic 1


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krusty kritter
 
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Old Magic1 wrote:

> On March 2, 1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico and
> became the Republic of Texas and existed as a separate nation
> after kicking some Mexican butt, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, the
> leading villain of Texas history. March 2 is an official state
> holiday - Texas Independence Day. Each year, there are numerous

parades,
> festivals and even a complete historical reenactment of
> the event.


Thanks for the history lesson, OM1. I read James Michener's book, "The
Eagle and The Raven". It was about Sam Houston and Santa Anna. It seems
that Santa Anna was el presidente of Mexico about four times, but was
finally banished to live in the Virgin Islands. It happened that a
representative of the USA came down to discuss purchasing the islands,
and Santa Anna was so egotistical he thought that US rep was coming to
visit him and help him return to power in Mexico City...

I did a genealogy for my friend, who thought he was descended from
Cotton Mather (he wasn't, turned out Cotton Mather was his umpteen
great grand uncle). Anyway, my friend told me he was also descended
from German hillbillies that lived in the Texas Hill Country. Sigismund
Engelking was his grandfather and Sigismund's grandfather was Ferdinand
Friedrich Engleking, son-in-law of Lieutenant Sigismund von Roeder.

The lieutenant was also a knight, a Prussian baron who became a Texas
pioneer. Family legend claims that von Roeder had to flee Prussia when
his son Siggy II killed the son of a Prussian diplomat in a duel.
Anyway, it seems to me that the von Roeder family came to Galveston
about 1835 and lived on the island at first. Then von Roeder was
present during a bit of Texas history called "The Runaway Scrape" when
the Mexican Army was trying to chase the non-Mexican colonists out of
Tejas...

Engelkings and von Roeders and their Kleberg relatives are mentioned in
the
University of Texas' online history of Texas. They settled around Cat
Spring, near San Antonio. Fascinating stuff about American and European
pioneers in Texas...

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Rich McCormack
 
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Rolly wrote:
> Magic, my amigo,
>
> You wrote "In Puebla and throughout Mexico, and in the United States,
> people celebrate Cinco de Mayo..."
>
> "AND THROUGHOUT MEXICO" just ain't true. Yes, it's a big day around
> Puebla, and it's a big day in many parts of the USA. But in most of
> Mexico it gets hardly a nod. In my town, nothing at all. It is odd
> that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is in almost
> all of Mexico.
>
> But, do party on!
>


Some historians believe the Battle of Puebla might be more
historically significant to US history than Mexican history.
It has been suggested that the French had plans to use their
position in Mexico to supply the Confederate troops during
the US Civil War in hopes of destroying the United States,
or at least fracturing the Union of states to their advantage.
The Mexican victory at Puebla kept the French pre-occupied
long enough for the Union army to gain the strength to defeat
the Confederate forces.




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Rolly
 
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March 2 is also the birthdate of Sam Houston. He was born in Virginia
on March 2, 1793.

I'm a Texan, too. From Lampasas.

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On Wed, 4 May 2005 08:08:27 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:

>
>
>"Old Magic1" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> wrote in message
.. .
>On Mon, 2 May 2005 12:37:43 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:
>
>
>
>Did you have permission from the copyright holder to use this entire
>piece, o_m1?
>
>
>jim
>
>For Jim, the NG Police,
>I am terribly sorry for costing the millions of dollars this site lost due



Nice try, plagerist. Your use is in violation of copyright law no
matter how insignificant you may view it to be.

So, you continue to be a petty criminal. Sameo-sameo. And you wonder
why no one likes or respects you in the ng.

Hullo? anyone home?Why aren't all the lights on, dimbulb?


jim



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OM_1 finally gives us an insight in his antagonistic attitude toward
all things Mexican. Do I detect the shadow of bigotry going on in
those dark corners of your peabrain?


jim


On Wed, 4 May 2005 08:40:13 -0500, "Old Magic1"
> wrote:

>
>
>"Rolly" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>Magic, my amigo,
>
>You wrote "In Puebla and throughout Mexico, and in the United States,
>people celebrate Cinco de Mayo..."
>
>"AND THROUGHOUT MEXICO" just ain't true. Yes, it's a big day around
>Puebla, and it's a big day in many parts of the USA. But in most of
>Mexico it gets hardly a nod. In my town, nothing at all. It is odd
>that Cinco de Mayo is a bigger thing in the USA than it is in almost
>all of Mexico.
>
>But, do party on!
>
>Sorry Rolly, I just come across the article and thought it would be of
>interest to some here and had some nice looking appetizers. I personally
>don't celebrate this holiday, I do celebrate March 2, 1836. On March 2,
>1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico and became the Republic of
>Texas and existed as a separate nation after kicking some Mexican butt,
>Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, the leading villain of Texas history. March 2
>is an official state holiday - Texas Independence Day. Each year, there are
>numerous parades, festivals and even a complete historical reenactment of
>the event. Of course I celebrate that little event that occurred back in
>1776 also.


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pulido
 
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only mexicans in the u.s.a celebrate this.

jl




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