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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 12:08 AM
Crone
 
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Rut wrote:

If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.

Thanks
Rut

A good way is to use a large dutch oven type pan.
I put Olive oil in and them crumble the meat in with my fingers and then
stir it a lot unitl I have crumbles.
Then I add my onions and seasonings and a can of tomatoes that are diced
cover and cook very slowly for 4 hours or so.
Then I uncover it and let it dry out a bit before making the tacos.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:05 AM
Charles Gifford
 
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"Jim Lane" wrote in message
...
David Wright wrote:
On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 13:36:30 -0700, (Dan Abel) wrote:


In article ,
(Rut) wrote:


If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.


Most of the Mexican restaurants around here don't use much ground beef.
Very few people order it. I did see one place cooking it, though. They
dumped a frozen 5 pound chunk of ground beef into boiling water. I've
used this technique many times in making Cincie-style chili. It makes
ground beef the way you describe.



OOF! That technique leads to boiling the flavor out of the meat.


Indeed, but it also lowers the fat content amazingly! ;-)

Instead, try roasting the meat until you can shred it with two forks,
or in your fingers. I think you'll like it. Use either beef or pork
shoulder.


Much better idea David. Sometimes though, ground beef is quick and easy.

David



Aw shucks, just throw a couple of taco-seasoning flavor packets in the
water and the meat will not be flavorless.


jim


You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:05 AM
Charles Gifford
 
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"Jim Lane" wrote in message
...
David Wright wrote:
On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 13:36:30 -0700, (Dan Abel) wrote:


In article ,
(Rut) wrote:


If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.


Most of the Mexican restaurants around here don't use much ground beef.
Very few people order it. I did see one place cooking it, though. They
dumped a frozen 5 pound chunk of ground beef into boiling water. I've
used this technique many times in making Cincie-style chili. It makes
ground beef the way you describe.



OOF! That technique leads to boiling the flavor out of the meat.


Indeed, but it also lowers the fat content amazingly! ;-)

Instead, try roasting the meat until you can shred it with two forks,
or in your fingers. I think you'll like it. Use either beef or pork
shoulder.


Much better idea David. Sometimes though, ground beef is quick and easy.

David



Aw shucks, just throw a couple of taco-seasoning flavor packets in the
water and the meat will not be flavorless.


jim


You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 05:17 AM
Jim Lane
 
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Charles Gifford wrote:

"Jim Lane" wrote in message
...

David Wright wrote:

On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 13:36:30 -0700, (Dan Abel) wrote:



In article ,
(Rut) wrote:



If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.


Most of the Mexican restaurants around here don't use much ground beef.
Very few people order it. I did see one place cooking it, though. They
dumped a frozen 5 pound chunk of ground beef into boiling water. I've
used this technique many times in making Cincie-style chili. It makes
ground beef the way you describe.


OOF! That technique leads to boiling the flavor out of the meat.



Indeed, but it also lowers the fat content amazingly! ;-)


Instead, try roasting the meat until you can shred it with two forks,
or in your fingers. I think you'll like it. Use either beef or pork
shoulder.



Much better idea David. Sometimes though, ground beef is quick and easy.


David



Aw shucks, just throw a couple of taco-seasoning flavor packets in the
water and the meat will not be flavorless.


jim



You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie



Agreed, Charlie, but if someone is concerned with flavorless and can't
figure out to add a few things like salt, pepper, onion, garlic, chili
powder. . .


jim
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 05:17 AM
Jim Lane
 
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Charles Gifford wrote:

"Jim Lane" wrote in message
...

David Wright wrote:

On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 13:36:30 -0700, (Dan Abel) wrote:



In article ,
(Rut) wrote:



If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.


Most of the Mexican restaurants around here don't use much ground beef.
Very few people order it. I did see one place cooking it, though. They
dumped a frozen 5 pound chunk of ground beef into boiling water. I've
used this technique many times in making Cincie-style chili. It makes
ground beef the way you describe.


OOF! That technique leads to boiling the flavor out of the meat.



Indeed, but it also lowers the fat content amazingly! ;-)


Instead, try roasting the meat until you can shred it with two forks,
or in your fingers. I think you'll like it. Use either beef or pork
shoulder.



Much better idea David. Sometimes though, ground beef is quick and easy.


David



Aw shucks, just throw a couple of taco-seasoning flavor packets in the
water and the meat will not be flavorless.


jim



You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie



Agreed, Charlie, but if someone is concerned with flavorless and can't
figure out to add a few things like salt, pepper, onion, garlic, chili
powder. . .


jim


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 03:35 PM
David Wright
 
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On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 21:17:29 -0700, Jim Lane
wrote:

Charles Gifford wrote:

You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie



Agreed, Charlie, but if someone is concerned with flavorless and can't
figure out to add a few things like salt, pepper, onion, garlic, chili
powder. . .

jim


My personal preference is to have meat that tastes like full-flavored
meat (and also has the texture of meat) and then add flavor components
that supplement the meat flavor.

I don't understand the taco-seasoning thing either. I much prefer to
add salt and spices ( and herbs) individually so I know quality of
what I'm adding and can choose the proportions I like. Obviously,
other peoples' milage varies on this or there wouldn't be a market for
such seasoning packets.

David

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 03:35 PM
David Wright
 
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On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 21:17:29 -0700, Jim Lane
wrote:

Charles Gifford wrote:

You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie



Agreed, Charlie, but if someone is concerned with flavorless and can't
figure out to add a few things like salt, pepper, onion, garlic, chili
powder. . .

jim


My personal preference is to have meat that tastes like full-flavored
meat (and also has the texture of meat) and then add flavor components
that supplement the meat flavor.

I don't understand the taco-seasoning thing either. I much prefer to
add salt and spices ( and herbs) individually so I know quality of
what I'm adding and can choose the proportions I like. Obviously,
other peoples' milage varies on this or there wouldn't be a market for
such seasoning packets.

David

  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 03:35 PM
David Wright
 
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Default

On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 21:17:29 -0700, Jim Lane
wrote:

Charles Gifford wrote:

You know Jim, I have never understood the whole "taco-seasoning" thing. I
have never used it although I have tried it. Just don't get it I suppose. I
have always flavored my ground beef, when using it, with just garlic salt
and pepper. I add seasoning to the taco proper when I eat it.

The idea of finely separated meat bits sounds a lot like the stuff served at
Taco Bell. Nasty --- to me anyhow.

Charlie



Agreed, Charlie, but if someone is concerned with flavorless and can't
figure out to add a few things like salt, pepper, onion, garlic, chili
powder. . .

jim


My personal preference is to have meat that tastes like full-flavored
meat (and also has the texture of meat) and then add flavor components
that supplement the meat flavor.

I don't understand the taco-seasoning thing either. I much prefer to
add salt and spices ( and herbs) individually so I know quality of
what I'm adding and can choose the proportions I like. Obviously,
other peoples' milage varies on this or there wouldn't be a market for
such seasoning packets.

David

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 09:19 PM
dejablues
 
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Rut wrote:

If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.

Thanks
Rut


I mash it with a potato masher while it's cooking.


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 09:19 PM
dejablues
 
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Rut wrote:

If you visit you favorite Mexican eatery and order a beef taco, you'll
notice that the ground beef of of small uniform size. Very small beef
granules. Can someone tell me how this is accomplished. It never looks
like that when you brown mean in a fry pan.

Thanks
Rut


I mash it with a potato masher while it's cooking.


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