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Old 09-06-2008, 07:35 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage

I would like to find a good tested recipe for making Chorizo sausage
at home. Any ideas or recommendations on the best place to look for
one?

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Old 10-06-2008, 12:22 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage


"racque" wrote in message
...
I would like to find a good tested recipe for making Chorizo sausage
at home. Any ideas or recommendations on the best place to look for
one?


http://lpoli.50webs.com/Sausage%20recipes.htm#FRESH


A basic Fresh Chorizo:
adjust to your taste, I do not use the optional spices:

1 tablespoon ground red chile of your choice.
1 pound ground pork
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin sometimes crushed seeds
2 cloves minced garlic
1 teaspoon salt


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Old 13-06-2008, 09:38 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage


"gunner" wrote in message
access...

"racque" wrote in message
...
I would like to find a good tested recipe for making Chorizo sausage
at home. Any ideas or recommendations on the best place to look for
one?


http://lpoli.50webs.com/Sausage%20recipes.htm#FRESH


A basic Fresh Chorizo:
adjust to your taste, I do not use the optional spices:

1 tablespoon ground red chile of your choice.
1 pound ground pork
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin sometimes crushed seeds
2 cloves minced garlic
1 teaspoon salt


The pound of ground pork is usually trimmings while dressing out the pig,
then stuffing into intestines to make the 'sausage'. In a Mexican ranch,
nothing is wasted of the pig except what's inside the intestine at time of
death. That is washed out neatly. Oh, and the blood clot is also tossed. The
blood plus onions goes into blood sausage.

Cumin is a recent addition to the traditional stuff.



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Old 15-06-2008, 07:10 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage


Cumin is a recent addition to the traditional stuff.


Recent? Traditional stuff? Wayne, stumping your "No cumin South of the
Tropics" belief again?


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Old 16-06-2008, 06:26 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage

Why is cumin not mentioned in any of Kennedy's books? I have them and have
searched. Also just using my experience in Mexico that is over 60 years. We
never used cumin.

"gunner" wrote in message
news

Cumin is a recent addition to the traditional stuff.


Recent? Traditional stuff? Wayne, stumping your "No cumin South of the
Tropics" belief again?





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Old 17-06-2008, 07:12 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage


"Wayne Lundberg" wrote in message
...

"Why is cumin not mentioned in any of Kennedy's books? I have them and have
searched. Also just using my experience in Mexico that is over 60 years. We
never used cumin."



I can't speak for Diana Kennedy. You will have to ask her why, Wayne but
I'm confident that you know the absence of fact is not proof of fact.

As for using her to give authority to your argument? As well respected as
she is, I do not see that her intent has ever been to validate her books
as "authentic" just because they do or do not list cumin. Knowledge
changes all the time as new information/understanding is discovered. There
can be many reasons she may not have listed cumin. Yet, to counter your
argument, here are recipes attributed to her that do list cumin, one is a
mole: http://www.ramekins.com/mole/yellowchickmole.html , the other, the
Maya pork dish, Cochinita Pibil from her web site:
http://www.dianaskitchen.com/page/pork/pibil.htm. As both dishes are touted
to be from SOT, that quite weaken your argument.

Nor does being an honorary member of the Old Gringo Chapter of the Ancient
Free and Accepted Society of MesoAmerican Juggernauts for over 60 years
give status as an authority. Truth be told, that just says ya old. Stating
that "We never used cumin" is a bit impotent. Ya gotta support your thesis
with facts, facts that can hold up to scrutiny. Otherwise, they are just
tall tales like the stories of Texas Chili, Chile en Nogada and Mole
Poblano. Just because one repeats these tales often (and/or loudly) will
not make them credible. You know there are many Mexican and Latin American
recipes with cumin (cumino) and from such noted chefs and authors such as
Elizabeth Lambert Ortiz, Zerela Martinez, her mother; Aida Gabilondo,
Patricia Quintana, Jim Peyton, Susan Trilling, Rick Bayless, Reed Hearon,
and Cheryl and Bill Jamison which are just as often touted as authentic with
the requisite little bits of "researched" folklore mixed in their books.
Why would we not assume cumin in Southern Mexico was as prevalent as we find
in other Latin American areas to the North, South and East along with trade?
You also see anise, coriander (cilantro), cloves, fennel, marjoram,
peppercorns, thyme as well as oranges, raisins, sesame, and almonds to
name a few other exotic in Mexican cooking, but the addition or omission of
these old world ingredients it is never touted as making it authentic or not
used. With all the other spices they use, it certainly is not to distance
them from Moorish or Spanish influence. Perhaps it is a disparaging slight
to Norteno cooking?

With all these contradictions, I would still like to know specifically why
you insist there is no cumin in authentic dishes SOT and why you said cumin
is a recent addition in Chorizo fresco? Butchering a hog to get a pound of
sausage didn't make much sense to me either.




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Old 18-06-2008, 05:04 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chorizo Sausage


"gunner" wrote in message
access...

"Wayne Lundberg" wrote in message
...

"Why is cumin not mentioned in any of Kennedy's books? I have them and
have
searched. Also just using my experience in Mexico that is over 60 years.
We
never used cumin."



I can't speak for Diana Kennedy. You will have to ask her why, Wayne but
I'm confident that you know the absence of fact is not proof of fact.

As for using her to give authority to your argument? As well respected as
she is, I do not see that her intent has ever been to validate her books
as "authentic" just because they do or do not list cumin. Knowledge
changes all the time as new information/understanding is discovered.
There can be many reasons she may not have listed cumin. Yet, to counter
your argument, here are recipes attributed to her that do list cumin,
one is a mole: http://www.ramekins.com/mole/yellowchickmole.html , the
other, the Maya pork dish, Cochinita Pibil from her web site:
http://www.dianaskitchen.com/page/pork/pibil.htm. As both dishes are
touted to be from SOT, that quite weaken your argument.

Nor does being an honorary member of the Old Gringo Chapter of the Ancient
Free and Accepted Society of MesoAmerican Juggernauts for over 60 years
give status as an authority. Truth be told, that just says ya old.
Stating that "We never used cumin" is a bit impotent. Ya gotta support
your thesis with facts, facts that can hold up to scrutiny. Otherwise,
they are just tall tales like the stories of Texas Chili, Chile en Nogada
and Mole Poblano. Just because one repeats these tales often (and/or
loudly) will not make them credible. You know there are many Mexican
and Latin American recipes with cumin (cumino) and from such noted chefs
and authors such as Elizabeth Lambert Ortiz, Zerela Martinez, her mother;
Aida Gabilondo, Patricia Quintana, Jim Peyton, Susan Trilling, Rick
Bayless, Reed Hearon, and Cheryl and Bill Jamison which are just as often
touted as authentic with the requisite little bits of "researched"
folklore mixed in their books. Why would we not assume cumin in Southern
Mexico was as prevalent as we find in other Latin American areas to the
North, South and East along with trade? You also see anise, coriander
(cilantro), cloves, fennel, marjoram, peppercorns, thyme as well as
oranges, raisins, sesame, and almonds to name a few other exotic in
Mexican cooking, but the addition or omission of these old world
ingredients it is never touted as making it authentic or not used. With
all the other spices they use, it certainly is not to distance them from
Moorish or Spanish influence. Perhaps it is a disparaging slight to
Norteno cooking?

With all these contradictions, I would still like to know specifically why
you insist there is no cumin in authentic dishes SOT and why you said
cumin is a recent addition in Chorizo fresco? Butchering a hog to get a
pound of sausage didn't make much sense to me either.


Great argument going here Gunner. Butcheering a whole hog to get some
chorizo is not the reason to butcher the hog. Butchering the hog is an
occasional thing on a Mexican ranch and as I said, there is nothing that
does not get used except for the stuff inside the intestines. The intestines
themselves used as sausage casing - chorizo and blood sausage.

My Mexican food teachers were all from the 'campo' and none were city
dwellers until later in their life. The principal 'teachers' were my
stepfather's mother from Veracruz, and his two sisters - both raised and
taught to cook in Veracruz, Puebla and Mexico City.

My comment, or statement that cumin is a recent addition to Mexican food
comes simply from never having seen it in any recipe nor used in any of
ours, including those meals prepared by our servants from other parts of
Mexico and my mother's own research where there is no mention of cumin in
any of her writings.

Rolly, if you re reading this, does Dona Martha use cumin? If so is this a
recent thing with her also?

I'm sure it has been a key ingredient to Chili since the chili queens
'invented' it in San Antonio all those years ago since beef is rather
tasteless if not mixed with chile and loaded with cumin. Which implies trade
with New Orleans, maybe.

Burritos were not known in Mexican fare until recently also. Burritos were
'invented' by the brazeros in the 40's and taken back home to share with
friends and family showing off their newly aquired taste for wheat tortillas
they had discovered in the north along with the refried beans and beef
inside them when possible. Again, beef is not a favorite meat for Mexicans.
Pork, chicken, turkeys, kid and lamb are the real favorites.

Of course all of this is opinion and lacking in true scientific research.
It's nothing more than sharing what I know and believe to be true.

Wayne






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