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Old 27-04-2004, 12:24 AM
Mark Preston
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

Why on earth do American celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

In speaking with many Mexican friends, they all say that it's about
their equivalent of Labor Day. If we wanted to have a party about
Mexico, here in the US, shouldn't we celebrate "El Grito", the 16th of
September? Mexican Independence Day?

Simplistic thinking says: "it started by Corona Beer's
advertisements". Yet, I'm sure there's more to it than that.

The obvious that it's a good day to have a beer or margarita is also,
not much help. Well . . . it never hurts to have a beer . . . but
that's another story.

Anybody out there know anything?

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Old 27-04-2004, 07:33 AM
Jim Lane
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

Mark Preston wrote:
Why on earth do American celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

In speaking with many Mexican friends, they all say that it's about
their equivalent of Labor Day. If we wanted to have a party about
Mexico, here in the US, shouldn't we celebrate "El Grito", the 16th of
September? Mexican Independence Day?

Simplistic thinking says: "it started by Corona Beer's
advertisements". Yet, I'm sure there's more to it than that.

The obvious that it's a good day to have a beer or margarita is also,
not much help. Well . . . it never hurts to have a beer . . . but
that's another story.

Anybody out there know anything?


Best way to think about it might be Armed Forces Day. It is military in
nature and was the first (?) time the Mexican Army beat the French at
the battle of Puebla.

It has served as a good break between Easter and the semester end and is
just another reason for gringos to party.

Mexican Independence Day is September 16.


jim
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Old 27-04-2004, 04:13 PM
Rich and Patti
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo


Mark Preston wrote:
Why on earth do American celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

In speaking with many Mexican friends, they all say that it's about
their equivalent of Labor Day. If we wanted to have a party about
Mexico, here in the US, shouldn't we celebrate "El Grito", the 16th of
September? Mexican Independence Day?

Simplistic thinking says: "it started by Corona Beer's
advertisements". Yet, I'm sure there's more to it than that.

The obvious that it's a good day to have a beer or margarita is also,
not much help. Well . . . it never hurts to have a beer . . . but
that's another story.

Anybody out there know anything?


There is some historical opinion that the Battle of Puebla, May 5,
1862, was historically important to the United States as well as
Mexico. The French, Spanish and English had come to Mexico supposedly
to collect debts. The Spanish and English quickly did so and left.
The French had more ambitious plans...annex Mexico, support and supply
the Confederate Army to ultimately divide and destroy the United
States. The underestimated Mexicans kept the French pre-occupied long
enough for the Union Army to defeat the Confederates and preserve the
Union. With the Civil War over, the U.S. sent its support south with
supplies, arms and men to help the Mexicans defeat the French and win
their independence. I'd say it's appropriate for U.S. citizens to
offer a toast to the Mexican victory at Puebla and join the Mexicans
in their celebration.

Rich


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Old 27-04-2004, 11:12 PM
Race Bannon
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

Are you serious? You ask, Why on earth do Americans celebrate Cinco de Mayo?
Don't you realize that Americans at large find any excuse to have a party?

Race

"Mark Preston" wrote in message
om...
Why on earth do American celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

In speaking with many Mexican friends, they all say that it's about
their equivalent of Labor Day. If we wanted to have a party about
Mexico, here in the US, shouldn't we celebrate "El Grito", the 16th of
September? Mexican Independence Day?

Simplistic thinking says: "it started by Corona Beer's
advertisements". Yet, I'm sure there's more to it than that.

The obvious that it's a good day to have a beer or margarita is also,
not much help. Well . . . it never hurts to have a beer . . . but
that's another story.

Anybody out there know anything?





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Old 28-04-2004, 02:49 AM
Bob Dietz
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo


"Rich and Patti" wrote in message
news

Mark Preston wrote:

There is some historical opinion that the Battle of Puebla, May 5,
1862, was historically important to the United States as well as
Mexico. The French, Spanish and English had come to Mexico supposedly
to collect debts. The Spanish and English quickly did so and left.
The French had more ambitious plans...annex Mexico, support and supply
the Confederate Army to ultimately divide and destroy the United
States. The underestimated Mexicans kept the French pre-occupied long
enough for the Union Army to defeat the Confederates and preserve the
Union. With the Civil War over, the U.S. sent its support south with
supplies, arms and men to help the Mexicans defeat the French and win
their independence. I'd say it's appropriate for U.S. citizens to
offer a toast to the Mexican victory at Puebla and join the Mexicans
in their celebration.


That, and at least some Americans fought on the Mexican side. These were
mostly anti-slave Texans who were prevented from joining up with the Union
army.

Bob Dietz



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Old 29-04-2004, 04:56 AM
Johnny Quest
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

"Mark Preston" wrote in message
om...
Why on earth do American celebrate Cinco de Mayo?


"Race Bannon" wrote in message
...
Are you serious? You ask, Why on earth do Americans celebrate Cinco de

Mayo?
Don't you realize that Americans at large find any excuse to have a party?

Race

Yeah Race! Like when you gave Hadji and me that wine
and Jessie showed us how to......PARTY!
Johnny
PS
I paid you and I want the negatives. OR ELSE!


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Old 29-04-2004, 06:52 PM
Mark Preston
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cinco de Mayo

Irma wrote in message snip

In speaking with many Mexican friends, they all say that it's about
their equivalent of Labor Day. If we wanted to have a party about
Mexico, here in the US, shouldn't we celebrate "El Grito", the 16th of
September? Mexican Independence Day?



DID YOU READ THIS PART?
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Old 29-04-2004, 06:54 PM
Mark Preston
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cinco de Mayo

Thanks, Rich,

Tu tiene razon!

But, it still doesn't explain how it came to be a popular AMERICAN holiday.
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Old 29-04-2004, 06:59 PM
Mark Preston
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

To all the people below my ORIGINAL post, namely:


|-14 Jim Lane Apr 26, 2004
|-15 Rich and Patti Apr 27, 2004
| \-16 Bob Dietz Apr 27, 2004
\-17 Race Bannon Apr 27, 2004
\-18 Johnny Quest Apr


I am asking why the United States had decided to celebrate a holiday
of another country. We don't celebrate anything from Canada, Costa
Rica, Puerto Rico, Azerbijan, etc.

Now, anybody got any clues?


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Old 29-04-2004, 07:16 PM
Jim Lane
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

Mark Preston wrote:
Thanks, Rich,

Tu tiene razon!

But, it still doesn't explain how it came to be a popular AMERICAN holiday.


Mexicans, btw, are Americans. Not USians, but Americans. Just like
Canadians and Brazilians. . . common usage aside.

It is popular for the reason I mentioned. Were it not for all the US
college students flocking south for a blow-off before finals and Corona
catering to them, it would be below most everyone's radar screen -
unless they came from Mexico, historical ties to the US notwithstanding.

This "holiday" back in the 60's barely raised eyebrows here in SoCal. As
college kids picked up on the day's timing relative to the usual
semester flow of holidays and tests, it became another reason to go
south and blow-off steam. Nada mas.

Corona, which had gained entry into the US on the back of surfers going
south, saw a good thing. The rest is history.

Cinco is celebrated by a lot of Mexicna Americans in the US because of
their heritage. Look at any big city's Italian section of town on big
holidays or Oktoberfest, if you think only Mexicnas do this. And we
"Americans" celebrate our own holidays while in foreign countries. We
celebrated Thanksgiving in Guadalajara and the 4th of July.


jim
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Old 29-04-2004, 07:17 PM
Jim Lane
 
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Default Cinco de Mayo

Mark Preston wrote:

To all the people below my ORIGINAL post, namely:


|-14 Jim Lane Apr 26, 2004
|-15 Rich and Patti Apr 27, 2004
| \-16 Bob Dietz Apr 27, 2004
\-17 Race Bannon Apr 27, 2004
\-18 Johnny Quest Apr


I am asking why the United States had decided to celebrate a holiday
of another country. We don't celebrate anything from Canada, Costa
Rica, Puerto Rico, Azerbijan, etc.

Now, anybody got any clues?


It is an informal celebration. Otherwise, should me some congressional
act declaring it a holiday. And then, find that same recognition for
Oktoberfest. . .

Get a grip.


jim
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Old 29-04-2004, 07:34 PM
Johnny Quest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cinco de Mayo


"Mark Preston" wrote in message
om...
To all the people below my ORIGINAL post, namely:


|-14 Jim Lane Apr 26, 2004
|-15 Rich and Patti Apr 27, 2004
| \-16 Bob Dietz Apr 27, 2004
\-17 Race Bannon Apr 27, 2004
\-18 Johnny Quest Apr


I am asking why the United States had decided to celebrate a holiday
of another country.

There are 63 million Mexicans in the US.
Texas and California, the largest of the continental states
are inextricably linked to Mexico by history and population.
That's why.


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Old 29-04-2004, 10:41 PM
Mark Preston
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cinco de Mayo

snip

I love any holiday that isn't as commercial as Christmas. I like Cinco
de Mayo as I've spent most of my adult life (40 years now) living in
the Southwest U.S. and as such am in favor of 5/5. Still, from a
cultural viewpoint, I wish I could understand how we came to pick this
day over any other.

Still, that is not the reason 5/5 celebrated from Maine to San Diego.
Admittedly, Corona had a lot to do with using the day to 'knock back a
few', but come on . . . below is a list of the Mexican "official"
holidays. If we had to pick just one, would we have chosen Cinco de
Mayo on our own? Would not Constitution Day be somewhat more similar
with US?

By the bye: I see signs that the US is now starting to celebrate Dia
de los Muertos, tambien.

You and each of you "get a grip" (gripe)

Mexican Holidays
Banks, governmental institutions, and some businesses will be.

January 1
Año Nuevo (New Year's Day). Celebrated with fireworks on New Year's
eve and Parades and Fiestas on New Year's Day.

February 5
Día de la Constitución (Constitution Day). Anniversary of the new
Constitution which came into effect in 1917.

March 21
Aniversario de Benito Juarez (Benito Juarez's Birthday). Celebration
of the birthday of one of Mexico's greatest national heroes.

Easter Week
Easter is one of the most celebrated holidays in Mexico. Fiestas,
parades, visits to the family and numerous religious processions and
services mark the event.

May 1
Día del Trabajo (Day of Work). Celebrated with a large parade.

May 5
Día de la Batalla de Puebla (Cinco de Mayo). Celebrated in remembrance
of the defeat of the French at Puebla in 1862.

September 1
State of the nation address by the president, a tradition since 1824.

September 16
Día de la Independencia (Independence Day). Celebrated by the
traditional "grito" or call to arms that Father Hidalgo called out at
the start of the war for independence. Parades, fiestas, fireworks,
and other celebrations mark the occasion.

October 12
Día de la Raza (Day of the Race). The day that Columbus discovered
America. Celebrated in Mexico as the day that the Spanish and Indian
people merged to become the Mexican people.


November 1 & 2
Todos los Santos (All Saint's Day) and Día de los Muertos (All Soul's
Day). Celebrated by remembrance of the dead with flowers, food, drink,
and candles at the nation's cemeteries.

November 2
Día de los Muertos (Dai of the dead), the day the sould of the dead
are believed to return to earth. Not really an official holiday but
widely celebrated and perhaps Mexico's most characteristic event.
You'll see signs of this celebration all over the place.

November 20
Día de la Revolución (Day of the Revolution). The anniversary of
Madero's call to arms to oust Porfirio Diaz. Celebrated with long
parades, fiestas, and fireworks.

December 8
Festival of the Immaculate Conception. Celbrated with religious
festivities across the nation.

December 12
Fiesta de nuestra Señora de Guadalupe (Festival of Our Lady of
Guadalupe) Celebrated by pilgrimages to the Basilica of the Madonna of
Guadalupe in Mexico City, processions in cities all over the country,
dance performances and Catholic Mass.

December 25
Navidad (Christmas). Celebrated with gift giving and religious
services.

In addition to these national holidays, there are many local holidays
and festivals unique to individual cities.


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