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Old 03-01-2004, 08:43 PM
Shelora
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salsa Macha

Had another version of Salsa Macha on the beach in Puerto Escondido.
This one was more like a chile oil, not unlike the ones served in
Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. Basically, toasted and ground
chile de arbol and oil.
On this site last year we spoke about another Salsa Macha made with
chiles and ground peanuts that is found on the Veracruz coast.
Since the coast of Puerto has Chinese and African influences among the
Indian and Spanish, I came to a theory that this particular salsa in
the result of the Chinese influence. What do you think?
Does anyone else have a different recipe for Salsa Macha?
Can hardly wait.
S

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Old 08-01-2004, 02:53 AM
Arturo
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salsa Macha

Had another version of Salsa Macha on the beach in Puerto Escondido.
This one was more like a chile oil, not unlike the ones served in
Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. Basically, toasted and ground
chile de arbol and oil.
On this site last year we spoke about another Salsa Macha made with
chiles and ground peanuts that is found on the Veracruz coast.
Since the coast of Puerto has Chinese and African influences among the
Indian and Spanish, I came to a theory that this particular salsa in
the result of the Chinese influence. What do you think?
Does anyone else have a different recipe for Salsa Macha?
Can hardly wait.
S


What is it typically served with? I've never had a mexican salsa matching that
discription. Can you post your recipe, I'd love to give it a try.

AQ
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-01-2004, 12:23 AM
Shelora
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salsa Macha

The salsa macha I had in Puerto was "hidden" away from us tourists. I
had to request it. I put it on everything quite frankly. This type of
chile oil is also used as a condiment in Chinese and Vietnamese Pho
(noodle soup) restaurants. Again, I just drizzle it over noodles and
broth to stunning effect.
Now, they wouldn't give me the recipe in Puerto or sell me a tub to
take back to Oaxaca city.
So this is how I figure the recipe. The oil amount is more than just
to loosen the blades of your blender. The ground chilies sit heavily
and wonderfully at the bottom of the dish or jar. This tells you that
alot of chile is used. It keeps the chiles from drying out of course
but colours the oil to a deep dark red - much like an achiote oil
would look like.
Vegetable oil is used. You have the choice of using just the oil or
mixing up the concoction and having both. Its got a real earthy kick
to it.
Even though I don't have exact proportions I don't think you would
have any problem with an experiemental recipe. Simply add more chilies
or more oil as needed.
Now, the peanut one I mentioned, I do have a recipe. The flavour here
invokes memories of Thai food.
I actually forget where this recipe came from, I only have Central
Veracruz listed below it. This recipe really rocks with fried
plantain.

Salsa Macha (Central Veracruz)

2/3c. chile de arbol (stems removed, seeds left in)

1/2c. roasted peanuts (unsalted)

1/4 - 1/3 cup vegetable oil

Grind together in a blender using the oil to loosen the blades. Oil
should also be well incorporated into the mixture. Salt to taste. Try
to make it as smooth as possible. Texture is not a bad thing either,
but make sure at least that the chiles and seeds are well ground up.

Enjoy.
Shelora


tuff (Arturo) wrote in message ...
Had another version of Salsa Macha on the beach in Puerto Escondido.
This one was more like a chile oil, not unlike the ones served in
Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. Basically, toasted and ground
chile de arbol and oil.
On this site last year we spoke about another Salsa Macha made with
chiles and ground peanuts that is found on the Veracruz coast.
Since the coast of Puerto has Chinese and African influences among the
Indian and Spanish, I came to a theory that this particular salsa in
the result of the Chinese influence. What do you think?
Does anyone else have a different recipe for Salsa Macha?
Can hardly wait.
S


What is it typically served with? I've never had a mexican salsa matching that
discription. Can you post your recipe, I'd love to give it a try.

AQ

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-01-2004, 01:08 PM
Michael Passler
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salsa Macha

On 8 Jan 2004 16:23:12 -0800, (Shelora)
wrote:

The salsa macha I had in Puerto was "hidden" away from us tourists. I
had to request it. I put it on everything quite frankly. This type of
chile oil is also used as a condiment in Chinese and Vietnamese Pho
(noodle soup) restaurants. Again, I just drizzle it over noodles and
broth to stunning effect.
Now, they wouldn't give me the recipe in Puerto or sell me a tub to
take back to Oaxaca city.
So this is how I figure the recipe. The oil amount is more than just
to loosen the blades of your blender. The ground chilies sit heavily
and wonderfully at the bottom of the dish or jar. This tells you that
alot of chile is used. It keeps the chiles from drying out of course
but colours the oil to a deep dark red - much like an achiote oil
would look like.
Vegetable oil is used. You have the choice of using just the oil or
mixing up the concoction and having both. Its got a real earthy kick
to it.
Even though I don't have exact proportions I don't think you would
have any problem with an experiemental recipe. Simply add more chilies
or more oil as needed.
Now, the peanut one I mentioned, I do have a recipe. The flavour here
invokes memories of Thai food.
I actually forget where this recipe came from, I only have Central
Veracruz listed below it. This recipe really rocks with fried
plantain.

Salsa Macha (Central Veracruz)

2/3c. chile de arbol (stems removed, seeds left in)

1/2c. roasted peanuts (unsalted)

1/4 - 1/3 cup vegetable oil

Grind together in a blender using the oil to loosen the blades. Oil
should also be well incorporated into the mixture. Salt to taste. Try
to make it as smooth as possible. Texture is not a bad thing either,
but make sure at least that the chiles and seeds are well ground up.

Enjoy.
Shelora


(Arturo) wrote in message ...
Had another version of Salsa Macha on the beach in Puerto Escondido.
This one was more like a chile oil, not unlike the ones served in
Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. Basically, toasted and ground
chile de arbol and oil.
On this site last year we spoke about another Salsa Macha made with
chiles and ground peanuts that is found on the Veracruz coast.
Since the coast of Puerto has Chinese and African influences among the
Indian and Spanish, I came to a theory that this particular salsa in
the result of the Chinese influence. What do you think?
Does anyone else have a different recipe for Salsa Macha?
Can hardly wait.
S


What is it typically served with? I've never had a mexican salsa matching that
discription. Can you post your recipe, I'd love to give it a try.

AQ


Some real facts of Salsa Macha

This Salsa Macha with chili and oil is very used in the coasts and is
mainly eaten with fried tortilla, and mayo as a snack (botana) before
or while you eat your starter and main dish. It is only used in the
seafood restaurants. That is why you don't find it easily in other
Mexican restaurants. In Puebla (Mexico) nobody would think of eating
this sauce without seafood. However,you may find another way to use
it.

In general, salsa Macha just means "lots of chili and little or no
tomato at all". So whatever the recipe, as long as it has lots of
chili (mainly red chilies) will be a salsa macha. The salsa macha,
like tortilla, has been the most common dish for the Mexican People
from the towns. At least,this applies to the central-south region of
Mexico. In the towns away from the cities, mainly men use to eating a
good quantity of salsa macha in a tortilla for lunch. I tried it once,
I promise it can make you cry!. People in the cities may eat this
sauce in very little quantities, just to add a little hotness to the
dishes.
My grand mother used to make it, and of course it is a different
recipe.I don't make this sauce since it is too hot, but I can say it
has lots of tree chili and a bit of garlic,water and salt. The
ingredients are set in a "molcajete" (mortar).This item does the job
of the liqudiser. The final flavour of the sauce will be given by the
kind of chili you use. You can try different types of dry chilies.

Chilies originally were found in tropical south America, in the times
when Columbus was exploring what he thought was India. Years later,
chili was taken to Europe and the rest of the world including India,
Africa, China and Asia. So I think it is very unlikely that this
sauce is the result of the chinese influence.



Miry













  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-01-2004, 11:48 PM
Shelora
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salsa Macha

Thank you Michael. That was the most informative and interesting
letter. It has made my day!
Thanks,
Shelora



Michael Passler wrote in message . ..
On 8 Jan 2004 16:23:12 -0800, (Shelora)
wrote:

The salsa macha I had in Puerto was "hidden" away from us tourists. I
had to request it. I put it on everything quite frankly. This type of
chile oil is also used as a condiment in Chinese and Vietnamese Pho
(noodle soup) restaurants. Again, I just drizzle it over noodles and
broth to stunning effect.
Now, they wouldn't give me the recipe in Puerto or sell me a tub to
take back to Oaxaca city.
So this is how I figure the recipe. The oil amount is more than just
to loosen the blades of your blender. The ground chilies sit heavily
and wonderfully at the bottom of the dish or jar. This tells you that
alot of chile is used. It keeps the chiles from drying out of course
but colours the oil to a deep dark red - much like an achiote oil
would look like.
Vegetable oil is used. You have the choice of using just the oil or
mixing up the concoction and having both. Its got a real earthy kick
to it.
Even though I don't have exact proportions I don't think you would
have any problem with an experiemental recipe. Simply add more chilies
or more oil as needed.
Now, the peanut one I mentioned, I do have a recipe. The flavour here
invokes memories of Thai food.
I actually forget where this recipe came from, I only have Central
Veracruz listed below it. This recipe really rocks with fried
plantain.

Salsa Macha (Central Veracruz)

2/3c. chile de arbol (stems removed, seeds left in)

1/2c. roasted peanuts (unsalted)

1/4 - 1/3 cup vegetable oil

Grind together in a blender using the oil to loosen the blades. Oil
should also be well incorporated into the mixture. Salt to taste. Try
to make it as smooth as possible. Texture is not a bad thing either,
but make sure at least that the chiles and seeds are well ground up.

Enjoy.
Shelora


(Arturo) wrote in message ...
Had another version of Salsa Macha on the beach in Puerto Escondido.
This one was more like a chile oil, not unlike the ones served in
Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. Basically, toasted and ground
chile de arbol and oil.
On this site last year we spoke about another Salsa Macha made with
chiles and ground peanuts that is found on the Veracruz coast.
Since the coast of Puerto has Chinese and African influences among the
Indian and Spanish, I came to a theory that this particular salsa in
the result of the Chinese influence. What do you think?
Does anyone else have a different recipe for Salsa Macha?
Can hardly wait.
S

What is it typically served with? I've never had a mexican salsa matching that
discription. Can you post your recipe, I'd love to give it a try.

AQ


Some real facts of Salsa Macha

This Salsa Macha with chili and oil is very used in the coasts and is
mainly eaten with fried tortilla, and mayo as a snack (botana) before
or while you eat your starter and main dish. It is only used in the
seafood restaurants. That is why you don't find it easily in other
Mexican restaurants. In Puebla (Mexico) nobody would think of eating
this sauce without seafood. However,you may find another way to use
it.

In general, salsa Macha just means "lots of chili and little or no
tomato at all". So whatever the recipe, as long as it has lots of
chili (mainly red chilies) will be a salsa macha. The salsa macha,
like tortilla, has been the most common dish for the Mexican People
from the towns. At least,this applies to the central-south region of
Mexico. In the towns away from the cities, mainly men use to eating a
good quantity of salsa macha in a tortilla for lunch. I tried it once,
I promise it can make you cry!. People in the cities may eat this
sauce in very little quantities, just to add a little hotness to the
dishes.
My grand mother used to make it, and of course it is a different
recipe.I don't make this sauce since it is too hot, but I can say it
has lots of tree chili and a bit of garlic,water and salt. The
ingredients are set in a "molcajete" (mortar).This item does the job
of the liqudiser. The final flavour of the sauce will be given by the
kind of chili you use. You can try different types of dry chilies.

Chilies originally were found in tropical south America, in the times
when Columbus was exploring what he thought was India. Years later,
chili was taken to Europe and the rest of the world including India,
Africa, China and Asia. So I think it is very unlikely that this
sauce is the result of the chinese influence.



Miry



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