Mexican Cooking (alt.food.mexican-cooking) A newsgroup created for the discussion and sharing of mexican food and recipes.

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Old 10-10-2003, 07:09 AM
Irma
 
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Default Old Fashion Biscuits


"William Jennings" wrote in message
...

"Linda" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
BTW, get out your Mexican cookbooks, and post a recipe for "old fashion
biscuits" none of mine (and I
have quite a few) have a recipe.

Linda


I'll bet those Mexican cookbooks are mostly in English. In other words
transcriptions of Mexican recipes one time removed from the source. Most
Mexicans have never used a cookbook. Mexican cooking is mostly an oral
tradition passed down from chef to apprentice, from mother to daughter. In
Mexico most good cooks will say "the secret is in the hands".


*****
Exactamente!

Irma.

I also have a large collection of cook books I've gathered around the

world.
Nothing is better than direct transmission and observation of a recipe
brought to life in full view. The historical vignettes and anecdotes
associated with some recipes may in some small way help a good cook

towards
the scents and flavors of an authentic Mexican kitchen.

doc





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Old 10-10-2003, 07:37 AM
Irma
 
Posts: n/a
Default Old Fashion Biscuits

Linda,

It is for sure a backery, since they bake its own bread and sell it, to take
home or to eat there. It is the same as Sanborns, they have restaurant but
they backe their own bread, sell it to take in the Cafeteria Sanborns or to
take home.

Irma.

"Linda" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
According to Googling, Desarrolladora de Franquicias Los Bisquets Obregón

is
a restaurant/cafe and not a "backery "


Linda


"William Jennings" wrote in message
...
Irma,

Here you go:

LOS BISQUETS BISQUETS OBREGON
Razón Social: Desarrolladora de Franquicias Los Bisquets Obregón SA de
CV.Lousiana No. 58, Col. NápolesMéxico DFC.P. 03810México
Contacto: Delgadillo, Adriana Email: :

doc


"Irma" wrote in message
.. .
Hi Linda;

This Biscuits are part of our "sweet bread" "pan de dulce" in Mexico,

since
my Mamy was a kid, Biscuits are found in any backery in Mexico, and

even
there is a house "Bisquets Obregon", that now has a lot of branches

all
over
Mexico city and some other states.

If they came from another country, they have been adopted to our

Mexican
kitchen long ago.

If this group as far as I understand is to discuss and share Mexican

food
recipes.

I had problems with this recipe long ago and I asked in this very same

group
about the recipe and Shelora, Arturo and Jerry helped me to figure out

my
problem.

Why you find this recipe out of place? Why you ask someone to post in
another group? just because you consider this recipe is not Mexican

food?
But, what about the others reading this group?

By the way, I hope now you answer my post, since I have made some

questions
to you before and you never answer.

Irma.


"Linda" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Look Mr. A1, I'm not trying to be rude or anything, but there are

several
groups that would be more appropriate for this recipe.
Try rec.food.cooking or alt.recipes, which are a couple. Honestly

"Old
Fashion Biscuites" are somewhat out of place here.

Linda

"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
.. .
Old Fashion Biscuits

2 cups All-Purpose flour
2 Tbls. baking powder
1/2 Tsp. salt
1/2 cup lard
2/3 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 450 F.
Put 2 Tbls. lard in a skillet and get it hot; grease the sides.
Stir together the flour, baking powder, and salt.
Cut in the lard until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Make a well in the center.
Pour the buttermilk in all at once.
Stir just until dough clings together.
Knead gently on a lightly floured surface for 10-12 strokes.
Roll or pat to 1/2-1 inch thickness.
Cut with a 2 1/2 inch biscuit cutter or big mouth jar, dipping the
cutter
into flour before each cut.
Transfer to the hot greased skillet, covering each biscuit with a

thin
coating of melted lard.
Bake in a 450 F. oven for 10-15 minutes, or until golden.
Makes: 10-12 biscuits.
Serve steaming hot with sweet butter and your favorite jam.

--
William Barfieldsr












  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-10-2003, 07:43 AM
Irma
 
Posts: n/a
Default Old Fashion Biscuits - The Saga Continues


"William Jennings" wrote in message
...

"Linda" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

According to Googling, Desarrolladora de Franquicias Los Bisquets

Obregón
is
a restaurant/cafe and not a "backery "




A Panaderia it is not. According to my notes the two best panaderias
(subjective opinion) in Mexico D.F. are next to one another on Av. 16 de
Septiembre near Eje Central, Pastelería La Ideal and El Globo. These
panaderias are among the oldest in Mexico.

*******
Right, they are good ones, but I wouldn't say the two best ones. I
personally don't like very much sweat bread from El Globo, however the cakes
are great.

Irma.


Erma has the e-mail address he for
""Bisquets Obregon." This was her original request last January.

Usually one selects Mexican bakery items with a pair of tongs and a tray
from a vast assortment of items in a the old style panaderias. Often

these
same bread stuffs will appear in nearby restaurants, cafes, loncherías and
sometimes the taquerías.

Interestingly, Los Bisquets Obregón appears to be a U.S.A owned chain with
various locations in Mexico including Cancun.

Does this help?

doc

DISCLAIMER: All opinions here belong to my cat and no one else




  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-10-2003, 07:16 PM
Gerald Kelly
 
Posts: n/a
Default Old Fashion Biscuits

"William Jennings" wrote:
I'll bet those Mexican cookbooks are mostly in English. In other words
transcriptions of Mexican recipes one time removed from the source. Most
Mexicans have never used a cookbook. Mexican cooking is mostly an oral
tradition passed down from chef to apprentice, from mother to daughter. In
Mexico most good cooks will say "the secret is in the hands".

Isn't that how Diana Kennedy got her recipes, by living in and
traveling around Mexico, talking to people and cooking with them ?
Read "A Culinary Education" or just about any recipe in the "Cuisines
of Mexico" and she mentions who taught her what, different
interpretations, etc.
Putting the oral tradition down in writing, not an unusual technique
for historians or cookbook authors.


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