Mexican Cooking (alt.food.mexican-cooking) A newsgroup created for the discussion and sharing of mexican food and recipes.

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Old 11-10-2007, 08:26 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

A Mexican friend of mine used to invite me over to their house and serve
me a fabulous dish, they said it was an old family dish, that was based
on noodles, of all things. I didn't even think Mexicans used noodles. It
had tomatoes, onions, chiles, and chorizo in it, too. Does this have a
name or does anyone know the recipe? Or was this just a Californian
aberration?

Melondy

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Old 11-10-2007, 08:42 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?


"Melondy" wrote in message
et...
A Mexican friend of mine used to invite me over to their house and serve
me a fabulous dish, they said it was an old family dish, that was based
on noodles, of all things. I didn't even think Mexicans used noodles. It
had tomatoes, onions, chiles, and chorizo in it, too. Does this have a
name or does anyone know the recipe? Or was this just a Californian
aberration?

Melondy


Noodles, aka Pasta has been a main item in Mexican cooking since Cortez
conquered them back in 1523. The road from the port of Veracruz to Mexico
City is about 400 miles as the crow flies, and about 600 winding up and down
the slopes of two mountain ranges. About midway the monks established a
resting place called Puebla. They brought in nuns to run the hospice and
conquerors, priests, diplomats, traders, pirates, thieves, politicians took
a break there for centuries, even to the mid 1900's. The Spanish brought
wheat in the form of grain for bread, and flour from where pasta is made,
Italian and Spanish style. They also brought chickens, pigs, cows and
horses... not to mention the plague that killed off most Amerindians. But
took back syphilis, a gift from the Amerindians.

So the exchange of foods and diseases, culture and warfare tactics has not
changed much since Adam and Eve. Right?

So... I'm thinking that you had a bowl of Fideo soup. Made from vermilion
thin pasta rolled into cakes and put into boiling broth, adding the salsas
and chorizo as the pot boils, then serving quickly. It's one of my
favorites, but I don't use the pork sausage chorizo... prefer chicken thighs
and drumsticks if I want meat in my Fideo soup.

Check with Rolly in this newsgroup for other ideas of what you may have been
enjoying.


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Old 11-10-2007, 09:03 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

On Oct 11, 12:26?pm, Melondy wrote:
A Mexican friend of mine used to invite me over to their house and serve
me a fabulous dish, they said it was an old family dish, that was based
on noodles, of all things. I didn't even think Mexicans used noodles. It
had tomatoes, onions, chiles, and chorizo in it, too. Does this have a
name or does anyone know the recipe? Or was this just a Californian
aberration?


No problemo. Tallarines con chorizo.

http://www.estrellavalpo.cl/site/apg...527094202.html

Buen provecho.

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Old 11-10-2007, 09:12 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

But what is a tallarin?


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Old 11-10-2007, 09:15 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

I know. I could look it up.

But it's more fun getting to know people this way!

"Wayne Lundberg" wrote in message
...
But what is a tallarin?






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Old 11-10-2007, 09:47 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

Wayne Lundberg wrote:
"Melondy" wrote in message
et...
A Mexican friend of mine used to invite me over to their house and serve
me a fabulous dish, they said it was an old family dish, that was based
on noodles, of all things. I didn't even think Mexicans used noodles. It
had tomatoes, onions, chiles, and chorizo in it, too. Does this have a
name or does anyone know the recipe? Or was this just a Californian
aberration?

Melondy


Noodles, aka Pasta has been a main item in Mexican cooking since Cortez
conquered them back in 1523. The road from the port of Veracruz to Mexico
City is about 400 miles as the crow flies, and about 600 winding up and down
the slopes of two mountain ranges. About midway the monks established a
resting place called Puebla. They brought in nuns to run the hospice and
conquerors, priests, diplomats, traders, pirates, thieves, politicians took
a break there for centuries, even to the mid 1900's. The Spanish brought
wheat in the form of grain for bread, and flour from where pasta is made,
Italian and Spanish style. They also brought chickens, pigs, cows and
horses... not to mention the plague that killed off most Amerindians. But
took back syphilis, a gift from the Amerindians.

So the exchange of foods and diseases, culture and warfare tactics has not
changed much since Adam and Eve. Right?

So... I'm thinking that you had a bowl of Fideo soup. Made from vermilion
thin pasta rolled into cakes and put into boiling broth, adding the salsas
and chorizo as the pot boils, then serving quickly. It's one of my
favorites, but I don't use the pork sausage chorizo... prefer chicken thighs
and drumsticks if I want meat in my Fideo soup.

Check with Rolly in this newsgroup for other ideas of what you may have been
enjoying.


I didn't know that!!! That's very interesting. I've explored Mexican
food through many cookbooks but never heard about the pasta connection.
I'll have to go back and explore further. Any hints as to which road I
should go up on?

And I have to thank you for an answer you and this newsgroup gave me
many months ago about a little candy treat I was looking for. So thank
you again:-)

Melondy
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Old 11-10-2007, 09:50 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

Wayne Lundberg wrote:
I know. I could look it up.

But it's more fun getting to know people this way!

"Wayne Lundberg" wrote in message
...
But what is a tallarin?





I'm guessing by reading the recipe...is it the pasta?

I've done a very poor job of translating it I know but I would really
love to make it for my husband.

Melondy
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Old 11-10-2007, 11:06 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

Pasta is very much a part of Mexican cuisine, but not made in the
Italian-style.

Look at the picture at the bottom of the page. Pasta with cream
served as a side dish. http://rollybrook.com/entomatadas.htm

Another one with spaghetti as a side dish: http://rollybrook.com/pollo-adabo.htm

Two kinds of pasta served in this one: http://rollybrook.com/guadalupe-part-2.htm

Rolly

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Old 12-10-2007, 02:55 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

Rolly wrote:
Pasta is very much a part of Mexican cuisine, but not made in the
Italian-style.

Look at the picture at the bottom of the page. Pasta with cream
served as a side dish. http://rollybrook.com/entomatadas.htm

Another one with spaghetti as a side dish: http://rollybrook.com/pollo-adabo.htm

Two kinds of pasta served in this one: http://rollybrook.com/guadalupe-part-2.htm

Rolly

What makes it different from Italian pasta? The noodles themselves or
the preparations? Thanks for sharing those photos.

Melondy
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Old 12-10-2007, 03:08 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

On Oct 11, 1:12?pm, "Wayne Lundberg"
wrote:
But what is a tallarin?


http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallarines

Los tallarines son un tipo de masa (pasta) alargada, de peque?o ancho
y forma achatada que integran el conjunto de las paste asciute (pastas
secas) de origen italiano.

http://www.infotematica.com.ar/recet...escaseros.html




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Old 12-10-2007, 02:02 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?


What makes it different from Italian pasta? The noodles themselves or
the preparations? Thanks for sharing those photos.

Melondy


The spaghetti and simple macaroni shapes are the same as you will find
in the USA, but the sauce will not be Italian-style -- it's usually
cream or butter. It is served as a side dish, not as a main course.

I have never seen the more elaborate pasta shapes in the grocery
stores I frequent. Sam's carries Prego sauce, but I have never seen
anyone use it (except me).

Rolly

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Old 12-10-2007, 02:07 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

On Oct 11, 3:12 pm, "Wayne Lundberg"
wrote:
But what is a tallarin?


Tallarines = noodles

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Old 12-10-2007, 09:29 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default What's it called?

On Oct 12, 6:02?am, Rolly wrote:

The spaghetti and simple macaroni shapes are the same as you will find
in the USA, but the sauce will not be Italian-style -- it's usually
cream or butter. It is served as a side dish, not as a main course.


Pero, los gabachos creen que pasta es un plato fuerte.



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