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Old 04-10-2007, 02:59 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

I need a recipe for the above named food. It is a long green chilie
that seems to have cheese in it and a batter encrusted wrap around it.
Looks as though it has been deep fried.
It was served with a kind of tomato sauce and green stuff that was
mashed with some ovlives on top and some green onions that had been
thinly sliced.
Therse were also served with some that looked like a hard chip and a
red dip that had various things in it. I was too afraid to try it.
I also had a tacoe. It was filled with meats and cheese. Very
difficult to eat. Everytime you put your fork in it and a knife to
cut it into a bite it nearly flew across the plate. Interesting but
would take eons to eat. Didn't see any other people trying them. We
were in Riverside, CA visiting and they have a very large mexican
area. In fact I think someone said it is mexican country or part of
Mexico.
I would like the chilie recipe. The rest is just too overwhelming.
Thanks amiges


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Old 04-10-2007, 04:20 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 3, 6:59 pm, brigmave wrote:
I need a recipe for the above named food.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chile_relleno is an anaheim or poblano
chile filled with cheese, dipped in egg batter and fried. No big deal.

It was served with a kind of tomato sauce


Red chile sauce, like enchilada sauce can be obtained in cans and
heated in a pan.

Add some sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, crushed peanuts, squashed
bananas or plantains and an enchilada sauce becomes a "mole" (mo-lee,
not mo-lay).

and green stuff that was mashed with some ovlives on top and some green
onions that had been thinly sliced.


Guacamole is a sauce made of chunks of avocado. Buy some avocados,
wait for them to ripen and squash them up and add onions, garlic, oil
and vinegar or mayonnaise and spices as desired.

There's a Spanish version of mayonnaise called "ajioli" that doesn't
have milk or eggs in it.

Therse were also served with some that looked like a hard chip


Totopos are dried corn tortillas that are deep fried in vegetable oil.

and a red dip that had various things in it.


There are at least six red salsas that range from Salsa Mexicana which
is no spicier than gazpacho, through Salsa Ranchera which is hotter,
to Xni Pec that will make you sweat, make your nose run and blow the
top off your head HOT.

I was too afraid to try it.


Buy some Salsa Mexicana in a can, or make your own at home. Dip a corn
chip into the salsa. Try it. If the salsa is too hot, eat more chips
without salsa. Salty chips dredge the active incredient of chiles out
of your mouth.

If you want to try spicy Mexican pickled onions and carrots, etc.,
look for "escabeche" in the Mexican section of your market.

I also had a tacoe. It was filled with meats and cheese. Very
difficult to eat. Everytime you put your fork in it and a knife to
cut it into a bite it nearly flew across the plate. Interesting but
would take eons to eat.


A taco is a sort of Mexican sandwich which you were supposed to eat
with your hands, not a knife and fork. Border Mexicans can eat a whole
meal without utensils, they scoop everything up with folded tortillas.

Didn't see any other people trying them. We
were in Riverside, CA visiting and they have a very large mexican
area. In fact I think someone said it is mexican country or part of
Mexico.


Tacos, tamales, enchiladas,burritos, refried beans and Mexican rice is
what ignorant welfare type Mexicans living along the border eat.They
think that's traditional Mexican food.

For a state with as many Mexicans as California has, they sure don't
know much about Mexican cooking.

I would like the chilie recipe.


Now that you know it's just a chile relleno (stuffed chile) you can
find a million recipes for it by googling.

The rest is just too overwhelming.


Once you realize that there are only about 20 items on the menu in a
Mexico taco joint like you were at, you will be underwhelmed by
Mexican border food.

Everything you ate was a sort of hors d'oeuvre called an "antojito".
You never got to the main course in the taco joint you visited.

You need to visit a "ristorante" to have a real Mexican dinner. The
best stuff will have the highest prices.



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Old 04-10-2007, 01:41 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

"Mr. Sardonicus" wrote in
oups.com:

On Oct 3, 6:59 pm, brigmave wrote:
I need a recipe for the above named food.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chile_relleno is an anaheim or poblano
chile filled with cheese, dipped in egg batter and fried. No big deal.

It was served with a kind of tomato sauce


Red chile sauce, like enchilada sauce can be obtained in cans and
heated in a pan.

Would be much better with salsa ranchera/ranchera sauce than enchilada
sauce.

Add some sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, crushed peanuts, squashed
bananas or plantains and an enchilada sauce becomes a "mole" (mo-lee,
not mo-lay).

and green stuff that was mashed with some ovlives on top and some

green
onions that had been thinly sliced.


Guacamole is a sauce made of chunks of avocado. Buy some avocados,
wait for them to ripen and squash them up and add onions, garlic, oil
and vinegar or mayonnaise and spices as desired.

There's a Spanish version of mayonnaise called "ajioli" that doesn't
have milk or eggs in it.


you don't put mayonaise in guacamole

Therse were also served with some that looked like a hard chip


Totopos are dried corn tortillas that are deep fried in vegetable oil.

and a red dip that had various things in it.


There are at least six red salsas that range from Salsa Mexicana which
is no spicier than gazpacho, through Salsa Ranchera which is hotter,
to Xni Pec that will make you sweat, make your nose run and blow the
top off your head HOT.

I was too afraid to try it.


Buy some Salsa Mexicana in a can, or make your own at home. Dip a corn
chip into the salsa. Try it. If the salsa is too hot, eat more chips
without salsa. Salty chips dredge the active incredient of chiles out
of your mouth.

If you want to try spicy Mexican pickled onions and carrots, etc.,
look for "escabeche" in the Mexican section of your market.

I also had a tacoe. It was filled with meats and cheese. Very
difficult to eat. Everytime you put your fork in it and a knife to
cut it into a bite it nearly flew across the plate. Interesting but
would take eons to eat.


A taco is a sort of Mexican sandwich which you were supposed to eat
with your hands, not a knife and fork. Border Mexicans can eat a whole
meal without utensils, they scoop everything up with folded tortillas.

Didn't see any other people trying them. We
were in Riverside, CA visiting and they have a very large mexican
area. In fact I think someone said it is mexican country or part of
Mexico.


Tacos, tamales, enchiladas,burritos, refried beans and Mexican rice is
what ignorant welfare type Mexicans living along the border eat.They
think that's traditional Mexican food.


Your choice of words show what an idiot you are, mayhaps you're the
*ignorant* one?

For a state with as many Mexicans as California has, they sure don't
know much about Mexican cooking.


Gads, you must be from Texas. They always confuse Tex-Mex as authentic
Mexican.

I would like the chilie recipe.


Now that you know it's just a chile relleno (stuffed chile) you can
find a million recipes for it by googling.

The rest is just too overwhelming.


Once you realize that there are only about 20 items on the menu in a
Mexico taco joint like you were at, you will be underwhelmed by
Mexican border food.

Everything you ate was a sort of hors d'oeuvre called an "antojito".
You never got to the main course in the taco joint you visited.

You need to visit a "ristorante" to have a real Mexican dinner. The
best stuff will have the highest prices.


When did Italian restaurants start serving real Mexican dinners??? doh!





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Old 04-10-2007, 02:12 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 4, 5:41 am, Layla wrote:

Gads, you must be from Texas. They always confuse Tex-Mex as authentic
Mexican.


Nope. I'm a Californio.

But I grew up among mestizo braceros who ran away from the
agrobusiness where they worked instead of going back to Mexico after
the harvest seaon.

They invaded our American working class neighborhood during WW2, and
moved into the delapidated motor court shacks and trailer parks.

But they knew they had to keep a low profile to avoid being deported.
So they claimed they weren't Mexican, they said they were "Spanish".

We thought that was funny, because we *are* Spanish, but we never
lived in Mexico at all, so we don't look and act like ignorant Mexican
Indians.

All the ignorant wetbacks in California know is tacos and tamales and
enchiladas and crap like that.

They think that fiesta snacks and pushcart food are special.

That's why a Mexican theme taqueria is decorated to look like you're
outside, in the zocalo of a small town.

It reminds them of when they went to town to celebrate some saint's
day.

When did Italian restaurants start serving real Mexican dinners??? doh!


Get a life, bruja.

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Old 04-10-2007, 02:49 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

For step by step pictures of the process, look he
http://rollybrook.com/chiles_rellenos.htm




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Old 06-10-2007, 10:31 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 7
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)


"brigmave" wrote in message
ps.com...
I need a recipe for the above named food. It is a long green chilie
that seems to have cheese in it and a batter encrusted wrap around it.
Looks as though it has been deep fried.
It was served with a kind of tomato sauce and green stuff that was
mashed with some ovlives on top and some green onions that had been
thinly sliced.
Therse were also served with some that looked like a hard chip and a
red dip that had various things in it. I was too afraid to try it.
I also had a tacoe. It was filled with meats and cheese. Very
difficult to eat. Everytime you put your fork in it and a knife to
cut it into a bite it nearly flew across the plate. Interesting but
would take eons to eat. Didn't see any other people trying them. We
were in Riverside, CA visiting and they have a very large mexican
area. In fact I think someone said it is mexican country or part of
Mexico.
I would like the chilie recipe. The rest is just too overwhelming.
Thanks amiges


Did you want a basic recipe?

Start with your long green chiles and decide fresh vs. canned. It's not
hard to do the fresh kind, if they have them in your store. But, if you
live where there aren't chiles, use canned ones - ortega whole green chiles
are the best of the canned.

Otherwise get California Green Chiles (mild) or Chile Pasilla (medium heat).
If they are fresh, put them under your broiler or on a hot grill till they
burn and then flip and burn the other side (you're going to remove the
burned part). When they are blackened, put them in a ziplock plastic bag
and toss it on your counter for an hour, then remove the black skin.

The canned chiles is easier, right? If you start with opening the can,
you're at the next step. Dust them off with flour so the batter will stick.
Either try to stuff each chile with a little white cheese: muenster is
close to what we use from Mexican stores (cacique). Or use jack cheese.
Mozzarella is too bland and too chewy. Pack the cheese in there. Someone
said throw in other things like seeds, but I'd try it just cheese first, how
most people expect them.

You can take two chiles, open them up and put the cheese between them
sandwich style for bigger rellenos. People remove the seeds inside if they
don't like hot, but they're not that hot, we leave them in.

Now you got chiles rolled (relleno) around cheese. Separate 3 eggs and whip
the whites up stiff. Add 1 tsp. cream of tartar or 1 T flour to help keep
it stiff (you can skip if necessary). Beat the yolks and add 3T milk to the
yolks to make it easy to stir the yolks back in.

I do the next part like this:

Heat 2-3 T canola or corn oil in a big frying pan (I use creuset), to medium
not scorching heat. Take a big slotted spoon and lift a dollop of egg
batter onto the pan, same size as your chiles (a bit bigger). Put the chile
on the egg, spoon more batter over. Fry at medium till the bottom side is
brown and the egg is cooked, turn over, do same, turn off or lower way down
your heat, and cover till the cheese is really melted.

Red sauce can come from can (it's okay). There's a great one called Old
Gringo from Texas, but if you can't find it, you can use any canned red
sauce - medium hot works best. You can also buy ancho chile powder online.
If you want more recipe for that, just ask.

My family actually likes ranchero style sauce on top of the rellenos, which
we do make with tomatoes. Boil a couple of good red tomatoes (you can add
tomatillos too) and then mash them. Stir in red chile powder and crushed
red pepper, more crushed red for heat. Add 1-2 T lemon juice, as much diced
onion as you want, and some diced fresh tomato too. Snip cilantro leaves
tiny if you want or add garlic too.

"Chiles rellenos" for spanish language googling.
Chile relleno for English - and there are tons of casserole style recipes
that are muy good!

Jessica R.




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old 07-10-2007, 10:05 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 73
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 6, 2:31 pm, "Jessica R." wrote:
"brigmave" wrote in message

ps.com...



I need a recipe for the above named food. It is a long green chilie
that seems to have cheese in it and a batter encrusted wrap around it.
Looks as though it has been deep fried.
It was served with a kind of tomato sauce and green stuff that was
mashed with some ovlives on top and some green onions that had been
thinly sliced.
Therse were also served with some that looked like a hard chip and a
red dip that had various things in it. I was too afraid to try it.
I also had a tacoe. It was filled with meats and cheese. Very
difficult to eat. Everytime you put your fork in it and a knife to
cut it into a bite it nearly flew across the plate. Interesting but
would take eons to eat. Didn't see any other people trying them. We
were in Riverside, CA visiting and they have a very large mexican
area. In fact I think someone said it is mexican country or part of
Mexico.
I would like the chilie recipe. The rest is just too overwhelming.
Thanks amiges


Did you want a basic recipe?

Start with your long green chiles and decide fresh vs. canned. It's not
hard to do the fresh kind, if they have them in your store. But, if you
live where there aren't chiles, use canned ones - ortega whole green chiles
are the best of the canned.

Otherwise get California Green Chiles (mild) or Chile Pasilla (medium heat).
If they are fresh, put them under your broiler or on a hot grill till they
burn and then flip and burn the other side (you're going to remove the
burned part). When they are blackened, put them in a ziplock plastic bag
and toss it on your counter for an hour, then remove the black skin.

The canned chiles is easier, right? If you start with opening the can,
you're at the next step. Dust them off with flour so the batter will stick.
Either try to stuff each chile with a little white cheese: muenster is
close to what we use from Mexican stores (cacique). Or use jack cheese.
Mozzarella is too bland and too chewy. Pack the cheese in there. Someone
said throw in other things like seeds, but I'd try it just cheese first, how
most people expect them.

You can take two chiles, open them up and put the cheese between them
sandwich style for bigger rellenos. People remove the seeds inside if they
don't like hot, but they're not that hot, we leave them in.

Now you got chiles rolled (relleno) around cheese. Separate 3 eggs and whip
the whites up stiff. Add 1 tsp. cream of tartar or 1 T flour to help keep
it stiff (you can skip if necessary). Beat the yolks and add 3T milk to the
yolks to make it easy to stir the yolks back in.

I do the next part like this:

Heat 2-3 T canola or corn oil in a big frying pan (I use creuset), to medium
not scorching heat. Take a big slotted spoon and lift a dollop of egg
batter onto the pan, same size as your chiles (a bit bigger). Put the chile
on the egg, spoon more batter over. Fry at medium till the bottom side is
brown and the egg is cooked, turn over, do same, turn off or lower way down
your heat, and cover till the cheese is really melted.

Red sauce can come from can (it's okay). There's a great one called Old
Gringo from Texas, but if you can't find it, you can use any canned red
sauce - medium hot works best. You can also buy ancho chile powder online.
If you want more recipe for that, just ask.

My family actually likes ranchero style sauce on top of the rellenos, which
we do make with tomatoes. Boil a couple of good red tomatoes (you can add
tomatillos too) and then mash them. Stir in red chile powder and crushed
red pepper, more crushed red for heat. Add 1-2 T lemon juice, as much diced
onion as you want, and some diced fresh tomato too. Snip cilantro leaves
tiny if you want or add garlic too.

"Chiles rellenos" for spanish language googling.
Chile relleno for English - and there are tons of casserole style recipes
that are muy good!

Jessica R.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com


Thank you for the instructions. I found this to be very good and
filling.
This really appealed to me. I also like tamales but ther are too
intricate to make.
I have now made the pickled carrots and they too are nice.
Thanks for your help.
Brig

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Old 07-10-2007, 04:23 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 19
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 7, 2:05?am, brigmave wrote:

Thank you for the instructions. I found this to be very good and
filling.


All Mexican peasant food is very filling, it's usually greasy with
pork lard and the beans give you gas and the corn meal fills you up
and the chile sauce satisfies your mouth and then it burns again
coming out the other end.

The problem that Americans and people from European countries run into
is when they start to mystify how Mexican peasants cook and they begin
to believe that they are experiencing some kind of "refined" culture
and dealing with "refined" and "gentle" people when they eat a taco or
a tamale or an enchilada, or whatever.

Actually, authentic Mexican food is just the peasant food of very poor
Indians using ingredients that don't require refrigeration. Mexican
peasants eat a lot of corn and corn meal based food and very few fresh
vegetables, If there is meat in an authentic Mexican recipe, the
animal was very recently slughtered, there was no time to age the
meat, so it was probably boiled until tender and shredded.

I also like tamales but ther are too intricate to make.


Tamales don't have to be all that labor intensive to make. You don't
have to buy dried corn husks and soak them in water and them fill them
with masa and spicy meat, you can just make a tamale casserole with a
thin lining of instant masa and a masa top.

I make my authentic-tasting tamale casserole in the microwave in a
covered bowl. Since the meat and sauce are already cooked, all I'm
doing is using the microwave for 15 minutes to boil the liquid and
then the masa is steamed while it sits cooling for the next 45
minutes.

Nacos living in Mexico do know how to do this. They put whatever they
want to cook into a clay pot and put the pot into the hot coals of a
wood fire after it dies down.

Mexicans always remember when they were poor Indians living in a shack
on welfare, so they keep on making tamales in the traditional manner
by filling wet corn husks with masa and whatever else they could
scrounge up.

These days, you know that Mexican women are recent nacos when they try
to sell you tamales in front of the supermarket.

More established nacos whose grandparents were wetbacks 50 years ago
just make tamales at Christmas and nacos give other nacos tamales the
same way Americans used to give each other fruitcake.

It has been said that naco mothers make tamales on Christmas Eve so
their little nacos will have something to unwrap the next morning, but
that's a lie, Mexicans don't believe in Santa Claus.



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Old 07-10-2007, 07:58 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 452
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)


"Jessica R." wrote in message
.. .

Thank you! The one problem I have always had with chile rellenos is to keep
the batter to stick to my slick deskinned chiles. Now I see a neat
solution... spoon the batter into the oil, then put the stuffed chile on
top... repeat the process for the other half.

Thank you! Thank you!



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Old 07-10-2007, 08:03 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)


"Mr. Sardonicus" wrote in message

----snip for brevity, for obvious reasons----

Methinks you were caught and hung upside down and used as a piñata not long
ago.

Further, the kids found their mark and your brains are now mush.

Where Is Dr. Specter and his lovely dinner guest now to handle your problem?





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Old 07-10-2007, 10:29 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)


"Mr. Sardonicus" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Oct 7, 2:05?am, brigmave wrote:

Thank you for the instructions. I found this to be very good and
filling.


All Mexican peasant food is very filling, it's usually greasy with
pork lard and the beans give you gas and the corn meal fills you up
and the chile sauce satisfies your mouth and then it burns again
coming out the other end.


**** you, Mr. Mountain View, Jefe de Silicon Valley. You know, you're
number 40 this week, mexican-hating mother****er, from your same
neighborhood. profitting off sitting on your fat white ass isn't enough for
you.

well you help invent the world so we mexicans can populate it and maintain
it for you. i'm sure that's what you meant to say right?

and farting out your ****ing cowmeat smell and your brussel sprouts.

El Maracon

The problem that Americans and people from European countries run into
is when they start to mystify how Mexican peasants cook and they begin
to believe that they are experiencing some kind of "refined" culture
and dealing with "refined" and "gentle" people when they eat a taco or
a tamale or an enchilada, or whatever.

Actually, authentic Mexican food is just the peasant food of very poor
Indians using ingredients that don't require refrigeration. Mexican
peasants eat a lot of corn and corn meal based food and very few fresh
vegetables, If there is meat in an authentic Mexican recipe, the
animal was very recently slughtered, there was no time to age the
meat, so it was probably boiled until tender and shredded.

I also like tamales but ther are too intricate to make.


Tamales don't have to be all that labor intensive to make. You don't
have to buy dried corn husks and soak them in water and them fill them
with masa and spicy meat, you can just make a tamale casserole with a
thin lining of instant masa and a masa top.

I make my authentic-tasting tamale casserole in the microwave in a
covered bowl. Since the meat and sauce are already cooked, all I'm
doing is using the microwave for 15 minutes to boil the liquid and
then the masa is steamed while it sits cooling for the next 45
minutes.

Nacos living in Mexico do know how to do this. They put whatever they
want to cook into a clay pot and put the pot into the hot coals of a
wood fire after it dies down.

Mexicans always remember when they were poor Indians living in a shack
on welfare, so they keep on making tamales in the traditional manner
by filling wet corn husks with masa and whatever else they could
scrounge up.

These days, you know that Mexican women are recent nacos when they try
to sell you tamales in front of the supermarket.

More established nacos whose grandparents were wetbacks 50 years ago
just make tamales at Christmas and nacos give other nacos tamales the
same way Americans used to give each other fruitcake.

It has been said that naco mothers make tamales on Christmas Eve so
their little nacos will have something to unwrap the next morning, but
that's a lie, Mexicans don't believe in Santa Claus.






--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old 07-10-2007, 11:20 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
tom tom is offline
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

El Maracon wrote:
**** you, Mr. Mountain View, Jefe de Silicon Valley.


http://css.sbcma.com/timj/pics/trolls.jpg


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Old 08-10-2007, 12:26 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 7, 2:29?pm, "El Maracon"
wrote:

**** you, Mr. Mountain View, Jefe de Silicon Valley. You know, you're
number 40 this week, mexican-hating mother****er, from your same
neighborhood. profitting off sitting on your fat white ass isn't enough for
you.


Ees dat joo, Feelthy Sanchez, joo gotta new ISP, now? Wha' happen to
da wan een Seattle, they keek joo off?

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Old 08-10-2007, 01:44 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 73
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 7, 8:23 am, "Mr. Sardonicus"
wrote:
On Oct 7, 2:05?am, brigmave wrote:

Thank you for the instructions. I found this to be very good and
filling.


All Mexican peasant food is very filling, it's usually greasy with
pork lard and the beans give you gas and the corn meal fills you up
and the chile sauce satisfies your mouth and then it burns again
coming out the other end.

The problem that Americans and people from European countries run into
is when they start to mystify how Mexican peasants cook and they begin
to believe that they are experiencing some kind of "refined" culture
and dealing with "refined" and "gentle" people when they eat a taco or
a tamale or an enchilada, or whatever.

Actually, authentic Mexican food is just the peasant food of very poor
Indians using ingredients that don't require refrigeration. Mexican
peasants eat a lot of corn and corn meal based food and very few fresh
vegetables, If there is meat in an authentic Mexican recipe, the
animal was very recently slughtered, there was no time to age the
meat, so it was probably boiled until tender and shredded.

I also like tamales but ther are too intricate to make.


Tamales don't have to be all that labor intensive to make. You don't
have to buy dried corn husks and soak them in water and them fill them
with masa and spicy meat, you can just make a tamale casserole with a
thin lining of instant masa and a masa top.

I make my authentic-tasting tamale casserole in the microwave in a
covered bowl. Since the meat and sauce are already cooked, all I'm
doing is using the microwave for 15 minutes to boil the liquid and
then the masa is steamed while it sits cooling for the next 45
minutes.

Nacos living in Mexico do know how to do this. They put whatever they
want to cook into a clay pot and put the pot into the hot coals of a
wood fire after it dies down.

Mexicans always remember when they were poor Indians living in a shack
on welfare, so they keep on making tamales in the traditional manner
by filling wet corn husks with masa and whatever else they could
scrounge up.

These days, you know that Mexican women are recent nacos when they try
to sell you tamales in front of the supermarket.

More established nacos whose grandparents were wetbacks 50 years ago
just make tamales at Christmas and nacos give other nacos tamales the
same way Americans used to give each other fruitcake.

It has been said that naco mothers make tamales on Christmas Eve so
their little nacos will have something to unwrap the next morning, but
that's a lie, Mexicans don't believe in Santa Claus.


It is obvious you are an overt racist! The Mexicans or Indians I have
met have all been decent hard working people.
Another example of the ugly American shows in your post sir!
Brig

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-10-2007, 02:29 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 19
Default Chilie Rellano (sp)

On Oct 7, 5:44?pm, brigmave wrote:
It is obvious you are an overt racist! The Mexicans or Indians I have
met have all been decent hard working people.


It's obvious that you have bought into the stereotypes that our
government and the open borders/free trade/globalist/capitalist lobby
is promoting. The "decent hard working people" you speak of are mainly
descended from the Mediterranean peoples of Spain and North Africa,
just as I am.

IOW, I am the same race as many of the Mexican bigots who are shouting
"racist" at Americans who want our immigration and national security
laws enforced, as well as the civil and criminal codes.

My Hispanic families had to leave Spain 300 years ago because they
refused to
convert to Roman Catholicism. They could not go anywhere in the
Spanish empire and they eventually had to leave France and seek refuge
from the Catholics in
England. From there, they moved to Maryland and found religious
freedom and tolerance.

Meanwhile, down in Mexico, the Spanish colonial system created a caste
and class sytem that determined a person's social status and his
upward mobility. Of course, the white Spaniard was on top, the second
class citizen was a person of any color who agreed to remain faithful
to the Roman Catholic church, The third class citizen was a mestizo,
who was a mixture of Spanish and Indian. His upward mobility depended
upon whether he lived as an Indian or as a European.

Those Mexicans who continued to live as Indians became the peasants of
Mexico,
but only if they survived the brutal slavery of the Roman Catholic
missions or the
slavery of the encomiendas, where they were forced to work for Spanish
masters.

In the present day Mexican system, about 800 wealthy Spanish families
own most of the land and control the wealth.

The mestizo descendants of the third class Mexican people have no
land, and no upward mobility. Their government wants them to move
north.

Every illiterate, impoverished Mexican who comes north and works his
butt off for under the table wages takes a job away from an American
citizen who deserves to have a good job make a decent wage in a well-
regulated industry.

Another example of the ugly American shows in your post sir!


You don't even know what "ugly American" means. That term refers to
Americans who went to southeast Asia in the 1950's and expected the
duplicitous communist Vietnamese to welcome democratic methods.

The Vietnamese had been fighting for their independence since the
1870's. They expelled the Chinese and the French and they wanted the
Americans out as well.

Now that you know what "ugly American" represents, you will understand
that I could not possibly be an "ugly American" for wanting law and
order and border security in the country that my ancestors *bought*
from Mexico in 1848.

I am not in Mexico, the illegals and anchor babies and grandchildren
of illegals are in America and they need to go home.



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