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Old 16-07-2007, 02:28 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

Did anybody happen to see the Mad TV skit where a fast food restaurant
hired a wild-eyed employee named Jorge who violently disagreed with
the restaurant' faux-Mexican menu and started trying to cook
"authentic" Mayan food in a dirt oven?

He dug a hole in the floor. He told the assistant manager that "Our
Mayan ancestors came from the Earth. When they die, they rot in the
Earth. We do Number 2 in the Earth. And, therefore, we cook in the
Earth!"

An American wanted his faux-Mexican cuisine prepared without cheese,
and Jorge told him that it
just wouldn't be "Mexican" without the cheese.

He said, "In my country we have a cheese fiesta. Everybody takes part
in the churning of the milk, the
curding of the cheese, the molding of the curds, and finally there is
the most important ceremony of all,
the cutting of the cheese."


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Old 16-07-2007, 03:41 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

Rechazador de Disparates wrote in
oups.com:

Did anybody happen to see the Mad TV skit where a fast food restaurant
hired a wild-eyed employee named Jorge who violently disagreed with
the restaurant' faux-Mexican menu and started trying to cook
"authentic" Mayan food in a dirt oven?

He dug a hole in the floor. He told the assistant manager that "Our
Mayan ancestors came from the Earth. When they die, they rot in the
Earth. We do Number 2 in the Earth. And, therefore, we cook in the
Earth!"

An American wanted his faux-Mexican cuisine prepared without cheese,
and Jorge told him that it
just wouldn't be "Mexican" without the cheese.

He said, "In my country we have a cheese fiesta. Everybody takes part
in the churning of the milk, the
curding of the cheese, the molding of the curds, and finally there is
the most important ceremony of all,
the cutting of the cheese."



Actually the Mayan culture does not make Mexican food "authentic. The
majority of Mexico is of the Aztec culture when it comes to the Indians.
The Mayan culture consists of parts of Guatemala into Chiapas and Campeche
into the Yucatan Peninsula.

It is also quite possible that the American customer is allegic to cheese /
dairy products.
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Old 16-07-2007, 05:37 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

On Jul 16, 7:41?am, Layla wrote:

It is also quite possible that the American customer is allegic to cheese /
dairy products.


Sigh. Eye roll

It was a *comedy* skit. The American customer was an *actor*.

The character of Jorge the Mayan cook satirized the illogical position
of people who claim that some commercial versions of traditional
antojitos are not sufficiently "authentic" for their demanding
requirements.

/Sigh. Eye roll

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Old 17-07-2007, 04:29 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV


"Rechazador de Disparates" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Jul 16, 7:41?am, Layla wrote:

It is also quite possible that the American customer is allegic to

cheese /
dairy products.


Sigh. Eye roll

It was a *comedy* skit. The American customer was an *actor*.

The character of Jorge the Mayan cook satirized the illogical position
of people who claim that some commercial versions of traditional
antojitos are not sufficiently "authentic" for their demanding
requirements.

/Sigh. Eye roll

Besides that... cheese was not an 'authentic' (pre Columbian) item - it came
when cows got to the continent.
And cheeses are not used on every Mexican dish, in fact, rarely.


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Old 17-07-2007, 04:52 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

Wayne Lundberg wrote in message
...
[snip]
Besides that... cheese was not an 'authentic' (pre
Columbian) item - it came when cows got to
the continent. And cheeses are not used on every
Mexican dish, in fact, rarely.


There weren't other sources of milk available pre-Columbian (i.e.:
domesticated mammals)?

The Ranger




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Old 17-07-2007, 06:09 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV


"The Ranger" wrote in message
...
Wayne Lundberg wrote in message
...
[snip]
Besides that... cheese was not an 'authentic' (pre
Columbian) item - it came when cows got to
the continent. And cheeses are not used on every
Mexican dish, in fact, rarely.


There weren't other sources of milk available pre-Columbian (i.e.:
domesticated mammals)?

The Ranger

The only thing close to a domesticated animal in those days seems to be the
dog, piglets and flocks of turkeys would hang around for scraps but were
never really domesticated. In Inca-land the lama and the alpaca may have
been used for milk. But not Mexico.


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Old 17-07-2007, 11:43 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

The Ranger wrote:
Wayne Lundberg wrote in message
...
[snip]
Besides that... cheese was not an 'authentic' (pre
Columbian) item - it came when cows got to
the continent. And cheeses are not used on every
Mexican dish, in fact, rarely.


There weren't other sources of milk available pre-Columbian (i.e.:
domesticated mammals)?

-----
Lactating pre-Columbian mexcrementas. I'm not sure about the
domesticated part, but animal? But of course!

--
Please visit www dot MEJICACA dot ORG! The site was written in pidgin
spicspeak using words of only one syllable or less but with tons of
pictures and drawings in order to qualify as mexcrement-friendly.
Registration and log-in not required for those with drenched backsides.
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Old 17-07-2007, 11:45 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Dirt Oven skit on Mad TV

Wayne Lundberg wrote:
"The Ranger" wrote in message
...
Wayne Lundberg wrote in message
...
[snip]
Besides that... cheese was not an 'authentic' (pre
Columbian) item - it came when cows got to
the continent. And cheeses are not used on every
Mexican dish, in fact, rarely.

There weren't other sources of milk available pre-Columbian (i.e.:
domesticated mammals)?

The Ranger

The only thing close to a domesticated animal in those days seems to be the
dog, piglets and flocks of turkeys would hang around for scraps but were
never really domesticated. In Inca-land the lama and the alpaca may have
been used for milk. But not Mexico.


mexcrements do not have the brains for that.

--
Please visit www dot MEJICACA dot ORG! The site was written in pidgin
spicspeak using words of only one syllable or less but with tons of
pictures and drawings in order to qualify as mexcrement-friendly.
Registration and log-in not required for those with drenched backsides.


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