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Old 23-07-2009, 01:15 PM posted to rec.food.marketplace
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Default 5 Things to Know Before Cooking Over Wood

Cooking with hardwood isn't that much different then cooking over
charcoal or on a gas grill. Or even over a stove for that matter. Your
goal is to get hot coals to provide a steady heat source.
First, the only time you will cook over an actual flame is if you are
roasting hot dogs or marshmallows. The only other time is if you're
frying because you need that intense heat to keep the oil over 350
degrees Fahrenheit.
Second, don't underestimate the time it will take for the fire to die
down and create the perfectly hot coals. A rule of thumb is that it
takes 25-30 minutes for the wood to burn down into coal. And you'll be
building the fire and adding in additional logs in order to get enough
coals. So it could take up to 3 hours depending upon the size of your
logs, and the number of coals you need for cooking.
Third, cooking times are going to vary depending upon the number of
coals you have, and how close your food is to the fire. If your pan is
really close, it will cook faster. And that can be a problem if you're
baking or slow simmering a stew or chili. Keep an eye on things, and
you'll be fine.
Fourth, don't be afraid to use the ashes. They are perfect for cooking
potatoes. You don't even have to wrap them in foil first. However, if
you don't, grease the outside first. Then be sure to wipe with a damp
cloth before serving so as not to surprise anyone. The ash is also
useful for baking fish. You absolutely want to wrap this in many
layers of foil to ensure that no ash gets into the fish while baking.
Finally, know your woods. Hardwoods are the best for cooking since
they burn slowly and easily. Soft woods should only be used for
kindling when getting the fire started. Have an assortment of green
and dry wood on hand and add it in as needed. The dry wood will get
the fire going hotter again, and the green wood will cool the fire
down due to the water content.
Cooking in the great oudoors can be thrilling. It gives you a chance
to connect back to the land and have a fun time. Just remember to have
a variety of woods, use them appropriately, and leave enough time for
everything to cook.

http://groups.google.com/group/arcook/

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Old 16-06-2010, 05:11 AM
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Posts: 1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Powell View Post
Cooking with hardwood isn't that much different then cooking over
charcoal or on a gas grill. Or even over a stove for that matter. Your
goal is to get hot coals to provide a steady heat source.
First, the only time you will cook over an actual flame is if you are
roasting hot dogs or marshmallows. The only other time is if you're
frying because you need that intense heat to keep the oil over 350
degrees Fahrenheit.
Second, don't underestimate the time it will take for the fire to die
down and create the perfectly hot coals. A rule of thumb is that it
takes 25-30 minutes for the wood to burn down into coal. And you'll be
building the fire and adding in additional logs in order to get enough
coals. So it could take up to 3 hours depending upon the size of your
logs, and the number of coals you need for cooking.
Third, cooking times are going to vary depending upon the number of
coals you have, and how close your food is to the fire. If your pan is
really close, it will cook faster. And that can be a problem if you're
baking or slow simmering a stew or chili. Keep an eye on things, and
you'll be fine.
Fourth, don't be afraid to use the ashes. They are perfect for cooking
potatoes. You don't even have to wrap them in foil first. However, if
you don't, grease the outside first. Then be sure to wipe with a damp
cloth before serving so as not to surprise anyone. The ash is also
useful for baking fish. You absolutely want to wrap this in many
layers of foil to ensure that no ash gets into the fish while baking.
Finally, know your woods. Hardwoods are the best for cooking since
they burn slowly and easily. Soft woods should only be used for
kindling when getting the fire started. Have an assortment of green
and dry wood on hand and add it in as needed. The dry wood will get
the fire going hotter again, and the green wood will cool the fire
down due to the water content.
Cooking in the great oudoors can be thrilling. It gives you a chance
to connect back to the land and have a fun time. Just remember to have
a variety of woods, use them appropriately, and leave enough time for
everything to cook.

cook | Google Groups
This is a really good article thanks for sharing..stop by Home - 3ISLESPICE.COM for some quick tips as well thanks
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Old 18-01-2011, 09:35 AM
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With all three of my pregnancies i never had tender breasts in the first trimester. i usually started getting tender in the 3rd trimester. some women do some women dont.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:54 AM
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Posts: 8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Powell View Post
Cooking with hardwood isn't that much different then cooking over
charcoal or on a gas grill. Or even over a stove for that matter. Your
goal is to get hot coals to provide a steady heat source.
First, the only time you will cook over an actual flame is if you are
roasting hot dogs or marshmallows. The only other time is if you're
frying because you need that intense heat to keep the oil over 350
degrees Fahrenheit.
Second, don't underestimate the time it will take for the fire to die
down and create the perfectly hot coals. A rule of thumb is that it
takes 25-30 minutes for the wood to burn down into coal. And you'll be
building the fire and adding in additional logs in order to get enough
coals. So it could take up to 3 hours depending upon the size of your
logs, and the number of coals you need for cooking.
Third, cooking times are going to vary depending upon the number of
coals you have, and how close your food is to the fire. If your pan is
really close, it will cook faster. And that can be a problem if you're
baking or slow simmering a stew or chili. Keep an eye on things, and
you'll be fine.
Fourth, don't be afraid to use the ashes. They are perfect for cooking
potatoes. You don't even have to wrap them in foil first. However, if
you don't, grease the outside first. Then be sure to wipe with a damp
cloth before serving so as not to surprise anyone. The ash is also
useful for baking fish. You absolutely want to wrap this in many
layers of foil to ensure that no ash gets into the fish while baking.
Finally, know your woods. Hardwoods are the best for cooking since
they burn slowly and easily. Soft woods should only be used for
kindling when getting the fire started. Have an assortment of green
and dry wood on hand and add it in as needed. The dry wood will get
the fire going hotter again, and the green wood will cool the fire
down due to the water content.
Cooking in the great oudoors can be thrilling. It gives you a chance
to connect back to the land and have a fun time. Just remember to have
a variety of woods, use them appropriately, and leave enough time for
everything to cook.

cook | Google Groups
Good article.. in olden days all people used this method to cook food. Cooking food over wood is healthy food when you take some cares.
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Old 09-02-2011, 09:54 AM
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Posts: 5
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The hug bothered me. How could he hug me when he didnít need to. I was shocked. No one had ever hugged me before. Not even my parents. Sure my parents hugged me once and a while but it was rare.
The phone rang all day. I wrote down all the messages like normal. Mom and dad didnít get home until midnight.


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Old 10-02-2011, 04:33 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Powell View Post
Cooking with hardwood isn't that much different then cooking over
charcoal or on a gas grill. Or even over a stove for that matter. Your
goal is to get hot coals to provide a steady heat source.
First, the only time you will cook over an actual flame is if you are
roasting hot dogs or marshmallows. The only other time is if you're
frying because you need that intense heat to keep the oil over 350
degrees Fahrenheit.
Second, don't underestimate the time it will take for the fire to die
down and create the perfectly hot coals. A rule of thumb is that it
takes 25-30 minutes for the wood to burn down into coal. And you'll be
building the fire and adding in additional logs in order to get enough
coals. So it could take up to 3 hours depending upon the size of your
logs, and the number of coals you need for cooking.
Third, cooking times are going to vary depending upon the number of
coals you have, and how close your food is to the fire. If your pan is
really close, it will cook faster. And that can be a problem if you're
baking or slow simmering a stew or chili. Keep an eye on things, and
you'll be fine.
Fourth, don't be afraid to use the ashes. They are perfect for cooking
potatoes. You don't even have to wrap them in foil first. However, if
you don't, grease the outside first. Then be sure to wipe with a damp
cloth before serving so as not to surprise anyone. The ash is also
useful for baking fish. You absolutely want to wrap this in many
layers of foil to ensure that no ash gets into the fish while baking.
Finally, know your woods. Hardwoods are the best for cooking since
they burn slowly and easily. Soft woods should only be used for
kindling when getting the fire started. Have an assortment of green
and dry wood on hand and add it in as needed. The dry wood will get
the fire going hotter again, and the green wood will cool the fire
down due to the water content.
Cooking in the great oudoors can be thrilling. It gives you a chance
to connect back to the land and have a fun time. Just remember to have
a variety of woods, use them appropriately, and leave enough time for
everything to cook.

cook | Google Groups

Nice! Thanks for sharing this idea. Im not really cooking in woods but this could be a handy info though.
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Old 18-02-2011, 02:33 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: London
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Powell View Post
Cooking with hardwood isn't that much different then cooking over
charcoal or on a gas grill. Or even over a stove for that matter. Your
goal is to get hot coals to provide a steady heat source.
First, the only time you will cook over an actual flame is if you are
roasting hot dogs or marshmallows. The only other time is if you're
frying because you need that intense heat to keep the oil over 350
degrees Fahrenheit.
Second, don't underestimate the time it will take for the fire to die
down and create the perfectly hot coals. A rule of thumb is that it
takes 25-30 minutes for the wood to burn down into coal. And you'll be
building the fire and adding in additional logs in order to get enough
coals. So it could take up to 3 hours depending upon the size of your
logs, and the number of coals you need for cooking.
Third, cooking times are going to vary depending upon the number of
coals you have, and how close your food is to the fire. If your pan is
really close, it will cook faster. And that can be a problem if you're
baking or slow simmering a stew or chili. Keep an eye on things, and
you'll be fine.
Fourth, don't be afraid to use the ashes. They are perfect for cooking
potatoes. You don't even have to wrap them in foil first. However, if
you don't, grease the outside first. Then be sure to wipe with a damp
cloth before serving so as not to surprise anyone. The ash is also
useful for baking fish. You absolutely want to wrap this in many
layers of foil to ensure that no ash gets into the fish while baking.
Finally, know your woods. Hardwoods are the best for cooking since
they burn slowly and easily. Soft woods should only be used for
kindling when getting the fire started. Have an assortment of green
and dry wood on hand and add it in as needed. The dry wood will get
the fire going hotter again, and the green wood will cool the fire
down due to the water content.
Cooking in the great oudoors can be thrilling. It gives you a chance
to connect back to the land and have a fun time. Just remember to have
a variety of woods, use them appropriately, and leave enough time for
everything to cook.

cook | Google Groups
Just got back from 2 weeks in South Africa, every braai (bbq) I went to was done on wood. Charcoal is only used when dry, good wood cannot be sourced and gas is not an option for any real South African.

As for the food, man do they know how to cook meat over on 'open flame', better than most restaurants cook it in the UK.
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