Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 15-02-2004, 12:12 PM
ASmith1946
 
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Default Food poetry

Still, "candy is dandy, but
liquor is quicker."


Always loved Ogden Nash. How about:

Celery, raw
Develops the jaw,
But celery, stewed,
Is more quietly chewed.

Ogden Nash
Reflection on Ice-Breaking

ANdy Smith

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Old 15-02-2004, 01:00 PM
Bob
 
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ASmith1946 wrote:

Still, "candy is dandy, but
liquor is quicker."


Always loved Ogden Nash. How about:

Celery, raw
Develops the jaw,
But celery, stewed,
Is more quietly chewed.

Ogden Nash
Reflection on Ice-Breaking


Just returned "Food" by Ogden Nash to my library. Some very funny,
extremely witty stuff in there. A thin volume, but well worth the read.

Food has had a very long history in poetry, going back to the
ancients. There's actually a good bit of contemporary food poetry out
there ranging from juvenile through young adult and on up to serious
adult works. Also food poems as sings. Googling turns up huge numbers
of all of them.

In colonial America and England before that, popular recipes appeared
as poems, presumably to make remembering them easier.

Pastorio

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Old 16-02-2004, 03:06 AM
Kate Dicey
 
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ASmith1946 wrote:

Still, "candy is dandy, but
liquor is quicker."


Always loved Ogden Nash. How about:

Celery, raw
Develops the jaw,
But celery, stewed,
Is more quietly chewed.

Ogden Nash
Reflection on Ice-Breaking

ANdy Smith


And another of his gems:

Parsley
Is ghastly
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
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Old 16-02-2004, 06:06 AM
Opinicus
 
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"Kate Dicey"

And another of his gems:
Parsley
Is ghastly


In the US I should think that would rhyme only in the more northeastern
parts of the country...
;-)

--
Bob
Kanyak's Doghouse
http://kanyak.com

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Old 16-02-2004, 06:23 AM
Opinicus
 
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This is one of my all-time favorites:

"Recipe for a Salad"

To make this condiment, your poet begs
The pounded yellow of two hard-boiled eggs;
Two boiled potatoes, passed through kitchen-sieve,
Smoothness and softness to the salad give;
Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl,
And, half-suspected, animate the whole.
Of mordant mustard add a single spoon,
Distrust the condiment that bites so soon;
But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault,
To add a double quantity of salt.
And, lastly, o'er the flavoured compound toss
A magic soup-spoon of anchovy sauce.
Oh, green and glorious! Oh, herbaceous treat!
'T would tempt the dying anchorite to eat;
Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul,
And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl!
Serenely full, the epicure would say:
Fate can not harm me, I have dined to-day!

Sydney Smith (1771-1845)

(From "The Oxford Book of Comic Verse" ed. John Gross. Oxford University
Press. Published in the 18-Feb-95 issue of "The Economist".)



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Old 16-02-2004, 08:17 AM
Bob (this one)
 
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Opinicus wrote:

"Kate Dicey"

And another of his gems:
Parsley
Is ghastly


In the US I should think that would rhyme only in the more northeastern
parts of the country...
;-)


I think it's:

Parsley
is gharsley

Ogden Nash, in "Further Reflections on Parsley."

Pastorio

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Old 16-02-2004, 08:34 AM
Patrick Porter
 
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"The kangaroo can jump incredible
He has to jump because he's edible
I would not eat a kangaroo
But many fine Australians do
Those with their cookbooks as well as boomerangs
Prefer him in tasty kangaroomeringues"

Ogden Nash
'Carnival of the Animals'

(One of my favorite Nashian rhymes)

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Old 17-02-2004, 08:29 AM
Martin Golding
 
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 08:23:14 +0200, Opinicus wrote:
This is one of my all-time favorites:
"Recipe for a Salad"
To make this condiment, your poet begs The pounded yellow of two
hard-boiled eggs; Two boiled potatoes, passed through kitchen-sieve,
Smoothness and softness to the salad give; Let onion atoms lurk within the
bowl, And, half-suspected, animate the whole. Of mordant mustard add a
single spoon, Distrust the condiment that bites so soon; But deem it not,
thou man of herbs, a fault, To add a double quantity of salt.


IIRC:
Twice the spoon with oil of Luca crown,
and once with vinegar, procur'd from town.

And, lastly, o'er the flavoured compound toss A magic soup-spoon of
anchovy sauce.
Oh, green and glorious! Oh, herbaceous treat! 'T would tempt the dying
anchorite to eat; Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul, And
plunge his fingers in the salad bowl! Serenely full, the epicure would
say: Fate can not harm me, I have dined to-day!

Sydney Smith (1771-1845)
(From "The Oxford Book of Comic Verse" ed. John Gross. Oxford University
Press. Published in the 18-Feb-95 issue of "The Economist".)


(It's a salad dressing, though the greens themselves are only mentioned
in passing.)

Anybody else ever made it? It is very nearly as good as advertised.

Rub the bowl with the cut side of an onion (or garlic).

Without justification, I measure the salt and mustard in teaspoons,
the oil (extra vigin olive, "from Luca" clearly to distinguish imported
olive from domestic rape) and vinegar (apple cider, most likely to be
"procur'd from town") in tablespoons. Whisk together before tossing
over a salad of mixed greens.

Low carb tip: Sieve two whole eggs, omit the potato.

Martin
--
Martin Golding | If you boil it, they will come.
DoD #236 BMWMOA #55952 SMTC #2 |

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Old 17-02-2004, 01:40 PM
ASmith1946
 
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Default Food poetry-- Sidney Smith

Bob:

This was published in several different versions in American 19th century
cookbooks. Sidney Smith was, I believe a British religious leader. I've looked
a bit for the original, but haven't located it.

By chance, does anyone have "The Oxford Book of Comic Verse"? Perhaps it cites
the original?

Andy Smith



This is one of my all-time favorites:

"Recipe for a Salad"

To make this condiment, your poet begs
The pounded yellow of two hard-boiled eggs;
Two boiled potatoes, passed through kitchen-sieve,
Smoothness and softness to the salad give;
Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl,
And, half-suspected, animate the whole.
Of mordant mustard add a single spoon,
Distrust the condiment that bites so soon;
But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault,
To add a double quantity of salt.
And, lastly, o'er the flavoured compound toss
A magic soup-spoon of anchovy sauce.
Oh, green and glorious! Oh, herbaceous treat!
'T would tempt the dying anchorite to eat;
Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul,
And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl!
Serenely full, the epicure would say:
Fate can not harm me, I have dined to-day!

Sydney Smith (1771-1845)

(From "The Oxford Book of Comic Verse" ed. John Gross. Oxford University
Press. Published in the 18-Feb-95 issue of "The Economist".)









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Old 17-02-2004, 03:05 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 08:29:27 GMT, "Martin Golding"
wrote:

IIRC:
Twice the spoon with oil of Luca crown,
and once with vinegar, procur'd from town.



Said Aristotle unto Plato,
'Have another sweet potato?'
Said Plato unto Aristotle,
'Thank you, I prefer the bottle.'

Owen Wister (1860-1938) American novelist


Boron


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Old 19-02-2004, 12:41 AM
Patrick Porter
 
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And that remark about Plato and his potato reminds me of WS Gilbert:

"Then a sentimental passion of a vegetable fashion must exicfte your
languid spleen
An attachment a la Plato for a bashful young potato
or a not-too-French French bean!
Though the Philitines may jostle you will rank as an apostle in the high
Aesthetic band
if you walk down Picadilly with a poppy or a lily in your medieval
hand..."

from 'Patience'
WS Gilbert

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