Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 19-02-2004, 02:48 AM
Kacey Barriss
 
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Default Bacon

Hi, J

I don't believe so. A panini grill is constructed in a manner similiar
to an electric waffle iron or pizzelle iron - both "plates" are grooved
so as to interlock when closed; slightly angled so the grease drips into
the drain groove. It cooks both sides at once. They are most commonly
used to do sandwiches. In the US there's a copy cat principle product
referred to as a George Foreman grill (only because he decided to
down-size the equipment use various plastics, etc. to decrease the price
and promote it as a "healthy alternative to the use of a BBQ".

Takes about 6 minutes to do a US lb of pork bacon to the fairly crisp stage.

Kacey

schachmal wrote:


panini grill? I've a chausser skillet. Is that the same? Please go on.

J


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Old 19-02-2004, 02:59 AM
Kacey Barriss
 
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Default Bacon

I can't speak for most American folks; but, in this particular area of
the States (SE Texas), it's rather taken a backseat to the use of the
BBQ grill - whether charcoal, electric, or gas. Years ago, when I lived
in a different part of the US, broiling was a common way to do steaks,
chicken pieces, etc. during the winter months.

Of course, traditionally, bacon is fried in a skillet (in this area) and
"drained" on a couple layers of paper towels. Some of the "geriatric"
people here also put a little vinegar in the skillet when frying bacon -
something I had never experienced when I lived north of the Mason-Dixon
line.

I don't have the expertise to answer the question the cultural
divergence of broiling/grilling. Perhaps some of our more learned
posters can enlighten us.

Kacey

Helen McElroy wrote:

After reading the start of that post again...
Yes, broiling. Generally a wire rack within a tray to catch drips.
Do American folk cook using this often?
It is a fundamental part of British cookery, and the government
encourage it as an alternative to frying.
If you guys don't, does anyone know where that cultural divergence came
from?

Helen


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Old 19-02-2004, 06:18 AM
Bob (this one)
 
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Kacey Barriss wrote:

Hi, J

I don't believe so. A panini grill is constructed in a manner similiar
to an electric waffle iron or pizzelle iron - both "plates" are grooved
so as to interlock when closed; slightly angled so the grease drips into
the drain groove. It cooks both sides at once. They are most commonly
used to do sandwiches. In the US there's a copy cat principle product
referred to as a George Foreman grill (only because he decided to
down-size the equipment use various plastics, etc. to decrease the price
and promote it as a "healthy alternative to the use of a BBQ".


In the early 50's in my parents' restaurant, we had a "sandwich press"
that we used to make grilled cheese sandwiches and the like. It was
two flat plates about a foot square that opened like a waffle iron,
both sides heated to brown the bread most wonderfully.

My parents sometimes cooked other things in it like steaks and bacon.
There was a drip tray (small) that had to be emptied several times a
day. But the sandwiches were wonderful, brown and crisped at the
surface, cheese all meltingly smooth inside.

Pastorio

Takes about 6 minutes to do a US lb of pork bacon to the fairly crisp
stage.

Kacey

schachmal wrote:

panini grill? I've a chausser skillet. Is that the same? Please go on.

J


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Old 22-02-2004, 03:52 PM
Olivers
 
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Default Bacon

Bob (this one) muttered....



In the early 50's in my parents' restaurant, we had a "sandwich press"
that we used to make grilled cheese sandwiches and the like. It was
two flat plates about a foot square that opened like a waffle iron,
both sides heated to brown the bread most wonderfully.


Ahhh, the classic applaince of Calle Ocho in Miami, necessary for the
preservation of the Cuban Sandwich as an art form.



My parents sometimes cooked other things in it like steaks and bacon.
There was a drip tray (small) that had to be emptied several times a
day. But the sandwiches were wonderful, brown and crisped at the
surface, cheese all meltingly smooth inside.


I still have an ancient "home model", smaller, with detachable uppper and
lower "plates" replaceable with "waffle iron
versions. Theres a little grease drip (under which some sort of open
container is required).

Classic road food/diner cuisine requires cooking bacon on a griddle, often
using a "bacon press", a flat surfaced, weighted, brick-sized object which
helps the cooking bacon the stay flat. Many were homemade, although
obscure restaurant service firms may still offer them. Also used for
"grilled cheese" in cafes without "sandwich presses" (the version used for
better Cuban sandwiches).

TMO


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Old 22-02-2004, 07:36 PM
Bob (this one)
 
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Default Bacon

Olivers wrote:

Bob (this one) muttered....

In the early 50's in my parents' restaurant, we had a "sandwich press"
that we used to make grilled cheese sandwiches and the like.


I still have an ancient "home model", smaller, with detachable uppper and
lower "plates" replaceable with "waffle iron
versions. Theres a little grease drip (under which some sort of open
container is required).

Classic road food/diner cuisine requires cooking bacon on a griddle, often
using a "bacon press", a flat surfaced, weighted, brick-sized object which
helps the cooking bacon the stay flat. Many were homemade, although
obscure restaurant service firms may still offer them. Also used for
"grilled cheese" in cafes without "sandwich presses" (the version used for
better Cuban sandwiches).


I have a bacon press that's sorta Food Network TV "nifty." It's cast
iron and about 8" across. A flat plate with a wooden handle. The face
of the plate has a bas relief of a pig with the words "Bacon Press"
debossed around it. No more the simple functional utility of a flat
sheet of cast iron. Now we have to have them decorated. Hilarious.

OTOH, The bacon stays flat. My other major use for it is to flatten
boneless, skinless chicken thighs when cooking them.

Pastorio

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Old 18-03-2004, 02:07 PM
Alf Christophersen
 
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On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 22:57:44 +0100, "Christophe Bachmann"
wrote:

I totally concur with what was written above, but would add that there's a
trick that can help, but is absolutely not guaranteed, it depends on the
amount of water that was pumped into your bacon, but just quickly rinsing
each cut in running cold water before patting them dry with absorbing paper


About30-40 years ago here in Norway when bacon was far more salted
than today, bacon pieces was simmered in hot water for a few minutes
to remove excess salt and then water poured out of pan and bacon
fried.
Then stickiness was no problem whatsoever.



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