Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 31-12-2003, 08:53 AM
Warren Okuma
 
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Default best historical reciepe


"Forrest" wrote in message
...
I found this site while looking for reindeer meat recipes (please, do
not ask) the other day-

The Axe-Woodsman Bacon-Grease Bear-Paw Cookbook
http://www.visi.com/~wick/axe/cookbook.html

Although at first some recipes may seem strange (braised bear paws???)
I am willing to bet that a lot of these have historical (if not
hysterical) antecedents. A number of them actually sound
appetizing...

and a happy Holiday on broiled starling-breast toast to you all!

Wow.



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Old 09-01-2004, 12:59 AM
Mark Zanger
 
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Default best historical reciepe -- hermit cookies

In writing my American History Cookbook, I especially enjoyed the early American cakes with lots of cream and butter. Eliza Leslie's 1827 Lafayette Gingerbread is delicious, and so is her pound cake from the same book, which I used to explicate a manuscript recipe for "Preble Cake" of 1832.

The spiced ketchups in Andy Smith's Pure Ketchup are very tasty.

I also made the 18th century chicken fricassee in "Martha Washington's Book of Cookery," which Martha probably never made, and it is delicious, but so rich you can only eat a little as a side dish to plainer fare, which is how it was originally eaten.

The first historical recipe I ever made was Lydia Maria Child's recipe for baked beans (no molasses or sugar) and I often come back to that one.

The 1877 hermit cookies in my book are very good, also. They are white spice cookies with chopped raisins.

Yield: About 100 cookies.1 cup salted butter, and some to grease baking sheets2 cups sugar1 cup raisins3 medium eggs (or two jumbo eggs)1/2 teaspoon baking soda3 tablespoons whole milk1 rounded teaspoon nutmeg1 rounded teaspoon cloves1 rounded teaspoon cinnamon6 cups flourEquipment: rolling pin and board, round cookie cutter or glass tumbler, food processor, two or more baking sheets, standing mixer or pastry blender.1. Remove butter from refrigerator an hour before starting.2. Chop raisins in a food processor by pulsing briefly. Do not grind to a paste.3. Cream together butter and sugar in food processor, or with a standing mixer, or with a pastry blender or a large fork.4. Mix flour with spices. Grease baking sheets and dust with flour.5. Dissolve baking soda in milk.6. Beat eggs until creamy and light.7. Work eggs into butter-sugar mixture, than add flour, raisins, and milk mixture in turns.8. Work into a stiff dough but do not knead. You may need a little more milk.9. When dough sticks together well enough to roll, flour the board and rolling pin.10. "Roll about one-quarter of an inch thick and cut with a round cake cutter." Arrange cookies on baking sheets.11. Gather scraps and roll out with the next portion of dough until all the dough is used up. (You can also refrigerate or freeze dough and bake the rest another day.)12. Bake about 12 minutes at 375 degrees.

--
-Mark H. Zanger
author, The American History Cookbook, The American Ethnic Cookbook for Students
www.ethnicook.com
www.historycook.com

"Warren Okuma" wrote in message ...
So what is your favorite historical recipe that you tried?


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Old 09-01-2004, 05:00 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default best historical reciepe -- hermit cookies

"Mark Zanger" wrote in
news:[email protected]_s53:

In writing my American History Cookbook, I especially enjoyed the
early American cakes with lots of cream and butter. Eliza Leslie's
1827 Lafayette Gingerbread is delicious, and so is her pound cake from
the same book, which I used to explicate a manuscript recipe for
"Preble Cake" of 1832.

The spiced ketchups in Andy Smith's Pure Ketchup are very tasty.

I also made the 18th century chicken fricassee in "Martha Washington's
Book of Cookery," which Martha probably never made, and it is
delicious, but so rich you can only eat a little as a side dish to
plainer fare, which is how it was originally eaten.


I have made this several times. It really is delicious but, as you said,
so rich that one cannot make a meal on it.

The first historical recipe I ever made was Lydia Maria Child's recipe
for baked beans (no molasses or sugar) and I often come back to that
one.


Curious, how does one make baked beans with neither molasses nor sugar?
Sounds interesting.


The 1877 hermit cookies in my book are very good, also. They are white
spice cookies with chopped raisins.

Yield: About 100 cookies.1 cup salted butter, and some to grease
baking sheets2 cups sugar1 cup raisins3 medium eggs (or two jumbo
eggs)1/2 teaspoon baking soda3 tablespoons whole milk1 rounded
teaspoon nutmeg1 rounded teaspoon cloves1 rounded teaspoon cinnamon6
cups flourEquipment: rolling pin and board, round cookie cutter or
glass tumbler, food processor, two or more baking sheets, standing
mixer or pastry blender.1. Remove butter from refrigerator an hour
before starting.2. Chop raisins in a food processor by pulsing
briefly. Do not grind to a paste.3. Cream together butter and sugar
in food processor, or with a standing mixer, or with a pastry blender
or a large fork.4. Mix flour with spices. Grease baking sheets and
dust with flour.5. Dissolve baking soda in milk.6. Beat eggs until
creamy and light.7. Work eggs into butter-sugar mixture, than add
flour, raisins, and milk mixture in turns.8. Work into a stiff dough
but do not knead. You may need a little more milk.9. When dough
sticks together well enough to roll, flour the board and rolling
pin.10. "Roll about one-quarter of an inch thick and
cut with a round cake cutter." Arrange cookies on baking sheets.11.
Gather scraps and roll out with the next portion of dough
until all the dough is used up. (You can also refrigerate or freeze
dough and bake the rest another day.)12. Bake about 12
minutes at 375 degrees.


I must try these. They are rather similar to a recipe I got from the
mother of a girl I dated in highschool, although those Hermits also
contained nuts and were baked as a drop cookie. The remaining ingredient
list is almost identical.

Cheers,
Wayne
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Old 11-01-2004, 11:41 AM
Roving Mouse
 
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Default best historical reciepe

"Warren Okuma" wrote in news:vu76u9neir6u30
@corp.supernews.com:

So what is your favorite historical recipe that you tried?




This simple but delicious recipe for a New England custard:

American Cookery by Amelia Simmons (1796)
CUSTARDS


Baked Custard.


Four eggs beat and put to one quart cream, sweetened to your taste, half a
nutmeg, and a little cinnamon; bake.


(bake until lightly browned on top, I might add..)

Roving Mouse


--

For nice links, visit my blog:
http://extremewebsurfs.blogspot.com
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-01-2004, 06:08 AM
Warren Okuma
 
Posts: n/a
Default best historical reciepe


"Roving Mouse" wrote in message
...
"Warren Okuma" wrote in news:vu76u9neir6u30
@corp.supernews.com:

So what is your favorite historical recipe that you tried?




This simple but delicious recipe for a New England custard:

American Cookery by Amelia Simmons (1796)
CUSTARDS


Baked Custard.


Four eggs beat and put to one quart cream, sweetened to your taste, half

a
nutmeg, and a little cinnamon; bake.


(bake until lightly browned on top, I might add..)

Roving Mouse


Must... buy... cream...

Thanks!




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