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Tom 19-07-2005 03:57 AM

Looking for the recipe for "pulse", the food that Daniel ate in the Old Testament
 
Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,

Tom

Richard Wright 19-07-2005 09:11 PM

On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 21:57:08 -0500, Tom wrote:

Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,

Tom


'Pulse' is not a recipe. It is the vegetable itself - any kind of
leguminous plant such as peas, lentils and beans.

Presumably Daniel would have eaten his pulses as a boiled mush, like
Indian dal.


TOliver 19-07-2005 10:02 PM


"Tom" wrote in message
...
Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,


I have no scientific or historical sources upon which to base an accurate
reply, but have spent much of my life consistently understanding the term
(at least to my own satifaction) as any one of a number of dried legumes,
reconstutued slowly over low heat. Such dishes are found (and appear
historical and literary references) all around the Mediterranean Basin from
the Pillars to the Levant, in North Africa, Egypt, in the Tigris/Euphrates
river networks, old Persia and throughout the Indian subcontinent.

IIRC, there are a number of modern (1600-present) references to "pulse" in
the framework of "dried peas".

From Dhal to Hummus to Split Pea Soup to Frijoles al Charro to "Pease
porridge hot, pease porridge cold, pease porridge in the pot, nine days
old...", thats the best I can do.....

TMO



Jack Campin - bogus address 19-07-2005 11:41 PM

I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that Daniel ate
in the Old Testament.


You aren't going to get anywhere without knowing the Hebrew word
(and what it means).

There is a Jewish cooking group, I think, they might know.

"Pulse" in English means a legume, which in Daniel's time and
place would presumably be ful medames (broad beans, field beans).
But the translators might have been guessing as much as I am.

============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk ==============
Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760
http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/ for CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975
stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557

Tom 20-07-2005 04:54 AM

The Hebrew word for pulse in Daniel 1:12 is

zeroa` zay-ro'-ah

or zeraSon {zay-raw-ohn'}; from 2232; something
sown (only in the plural), i.e. a vegetable (as
food):--pulse.

There is another reference to pulse in 2 Samuel 17:28, but the Hebrew
word here is

qaliy kaw-lee'

or qaliyi {kaw-lee'}; from 7033; roasted ears of
grain:--parched corn.

The reference in Daniel indicates vegetables, not just one.
The reference in 2 Samuel is parched corn.

Thank you for your comments. I will keep looking:)

Tom




On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 23:41:46 +0100, Jack Campin - bogus address
wrote:

I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that Daniel ate
in the Old Testament.


You aren't going to get anywhere without knowing the Hebrew word
(and what it means).

There is a Jewish cooking group, I think, they might know.

"Pulse" in English means a legume, which in Daniel's time and
place would presumably be ful medames (broad beans, field beans).
But the translators might have been guessing as much as I am.

============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk ==============
Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760
http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/ for CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975
stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557



Tom 20-07-2005 05:00 AM

You may be correct. I found this on the net

PULSE

puls (zero'-im (Dan 1:12 margin, "herbs"), zere'onim (Dan 1:16);
compare zerua`, "sowing seed" (Lev 11:37), and zeru'im, "things sown"
(Isa 61:11)): (1) In Dan 1:12,16, it must mean herbs or vegetables
grown from seeds; a vegetable diet is what is implied. (2) In 2 Sam
17:28, "pulse" after "parched" is not in the original, but is probably
more correct than the translation in (1), as "pulse" usually implies
leguminous plants, peas, beans, etc.

Thank you for your comments.

Tom





On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 21:02:13 GMT, "TOliver"
wrote:


"Tom" wrote in message
.. .
Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,


I have no scientific or historical sources upon which to base an accurate
reply, but have spent much of my life consistently understanding the term
(at least to my own satifaction) as any one of a number of dried legumes,
reconstutued slowly over low heat. Such dishes are found (and appear
historical and literary references) all around the Mediterranean Basin from
the Pillars to the Levant, in North Africa, Egypt, in the Tigris/Euphrates
river networks, old Persia and throughout the Indian subcontinent.

IIRC, there are a number of modern (1600-present) references to "pulse" in
the framework of "dried peas".

From Dhal to Hummus to Split Pea Soup to Frijoles al Charro to "Pease
porridge hot, pease porridge cold, pease porridge in the pot, nine days
old...", thats the best I can do.....

TMO



Tom 20-07-2005 05:02 AM

I just found this on the net. It agrees with your comments


PULSE

puls (zero'-im (Dan 1:12 margin, "herbs"), zere'onim (Dan 1:16);
compare zerua`, "sowing seed" (Lev 11:37), and zeru'im, "things sown"
(Isa 61:11)): (1) In Dan 1:12,16, it must mean herbs or vegetables
grown from seeds; a vegetable diet is what is implied. (2) In 2 Sam
17:28, "pulse" after "parched" is not in the original, but is probably
more correct than the translation in (1), as "pulse" usually implies
leguminous plants, peas, beans, etc.

Thank you for your comments.

Tom



On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 06:11:04 +1000, Richard Wright
wrote:

On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 21:57:08 -0500, Tom wrote:

Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,

Tom


'Pulse' is not a recipe. It is the vegetable itself - any kind of
leguminous plant such as peas, lentils and beans.

Presumably Daniel would have eaten his pulses as a boiled mush, like
Indian dal.



Waldo Centini 20-07-2005 07:51 PM

Tom surprised us with

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.


"Pulse" usually in culinary circles refers to seeds from vegetables,
usuallu those formed in pods, i.e beans and such. Usually in dried form.
Considering what was common fare in biblical terms, and still is in the
region (middle-east) my guess it woul be lentils, or broad beans.

--
Waldo

*** Is This A Dead Parrot I See Before Me ***
To respond through email remove removespam

Jason B 08-09-2014 03:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom (Post 422926)
Hi,

My name is Tom. I am looking for a recipe for "pulse", the food that
Daniel ate in the Old Testament. From my research I know that it was
not meat or fruit. I have searched the net and the book stores, but
have not found anyone who could tell me which vegetables were used in
pulse, or how it was prepared. If someone has this information and
would be willing to share it with me, I would be ever so thankfull.
Thank you,

Tom

Tom

I know this is a really old thread.

I found out about pulse from Don Toleman. He may be able to answer this question for you. He created some product lines around this and is a health nut. I'm not sure if you can contact him personally but he does have a website where he sells his pulse product. Might be worth a shot to hear how he discovered pulse. I saw him speak about it in the 90s. thedontolman.com I'm not sure if this is really pulse or not but it's an amazing product. Good luck.

It is dried fruits and nuts some grains, poppy seeds, all dried in a special way then mixed together to form a very portable product.


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