Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 29-07-2004, 02:42 PM
Lee Rudolph
 
Posts: n/a
Default you say "pan noche", I say "penuche" (was, [AFU] Real-life "NO PLATE" sighting)

[temporarily transplanted to r.f.h, followups back to AFU]

Olivers writes:

R H Draney extrapolated from data available...
Marc Reeve filted:
pan ocho? I don't get it. (Is this an idiom that has somehow slipped
through my mental collection of Spanish vulgarities?)


Apparently...it might be more familiar if you make one word out of it,
and maybe do a gender-reassignment...I've heard there are several
variants...it's basically a reference to the female genitalia....r

I grew up with "pan noche", night bread, as a TexMex equivalent of the
common English vernacular for female sex organs, but would not have made it
as appropriate New Mexico Spanish.


Rub\'en Cobos's scholarly "A Dictionary of New Mexico and Southern
Colorado Spanish" (ISBN 0-89013-142-2; published 1983, based on
Cobos's research starting in the early 1940s) has this entry:

_Panocha_, f. [Mex. Sp. _panocha_, a kind of raw brown sugar]
a pudding, conserve or dessert made from ground wheat grain
which has been sprouted. Also, female organ (taboo).

I presume that AmEng "penuche" (brown-sugar fudge) also comes from
_panocha_. I further presume that no particularly close-sounding
variant of _panocha_ was current in Nicaragua during the late 1920s;
else my father would *not* have repeatedly told mixed groups the
story of how a tin of penuche, sent to him by his sister when he
was stationed there during the Second Nicaraguan Campaign, and
which had acquired a thick growth of mold during its long transit
through the tropics, was eagerly consumed by him and his fellow
Horse Marines, after simply scraping the mold off.

Lee Rudolph

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Old 29-07-2004, 02:42 PM
Lee Rudolph
 
Posts: n/a
Default you say "pan noche", I say "penuche" (was, [AFU] Real-life "NO PLATE" sighting)

[temporarily transplanted to r.f.h, followups back to AFU]

Olivers writes:

R H Draney extrapolated from data available...
Marc Reeve filted:
pan ocho? I don't get it. (Is this an idiom that has somehow slipped
through my mental collection of Spanish vulgarities?)


Apparently...it might be more familiar if you make one word out of it,
and maybe do a gender-reassignment...I've heard there are several
variants...it's basically a reference to the female genitalia....r

I grew up with "pan noche", night bread, as a TexMex equivalent of the
common English vernacular for female sex organs, but would not have made it
as appropriate New Mexico Spanish.


Rub\'en Cobos's scholarly "A Dictionary of New Mexico and Southern
Colorado Spanish" (ISBN 0-89013-142-2; published 1983, based on
Cobos's research starting in the early 1940s) has this entry:

_Panocha_, f. [Mex. Sp. _panocha_, a kind of raw brown sugar]
a pudding, conserve or dessert made from ground wheat grain
which has been sprouted. Also, female organ (taboo).

I presume that AmEng "penuche" (brown-sugar fudge) also comes from
_panocha_. I further presume that no particularly close-sounding
variant of _panocha_ was current in Nicaragua during the late 1920s;
else my father would *not* have repeatedly told mixed groups the
story of how a tin of penuche, sent to him by his sister when he
was stationed there during the Second Nicaraguan Campaign, and
which had acquired a thick growth of mold during its long transit
through the tropics, was eagerly consumed by him and his fellow
Horse Marines, after simply scraping the mold off.

Lee Rudolph
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-07-2004, 02:42 PM
Lee Rudolph
 
Posts: n/a
Default you say "pan noche", I say "penuche" (was, [AFU] Real-life "NO PLATE" sighting)

[temporarily transplanted to r.f.h, followups back to AFU]

Olivers writes:

R H Draney extrapolated from data available...
Marc Reeve filted:
pan ocho? I don't get it. (Is this an idiom that has somehow slipped
through my mental collection of Spanish vulgarities?)


Apparently...it might be more familiar if you make one word out of it,
and maybe do a gender-reassignment...I've heard there are several
variants...it's basically a reference to the female genitalia....r

I grew up with "pan noche", night bread, as a TexMex equivalent of the
common English vernacular for female sex organs, but would not have made it
as appropriate New Mexico Spanish.


Rub\'en Cobos's scholarly "A Dictionary of New Mexico and Southern
Colorado Spanish" (ISBN 0-89013-142-2; published 1983, based on
Cobos's research starting in the early 1940s) has this entry:

_Panocha_, f. [Mex. Sp. _panocha_, a kind of raw brown sugar]
a pudding, conserve or dessert made from ground wheat grain
which has been sprouted. Also, female organ (taboo).

I presume that AmEng "penuche" (brown-sugar fudge) also comes from
_panocha_. I further presume that no particularly close-sounding
variant of _panocha_ was current in Nicaragua during the late 1920s;
else my father would *not* have repeatedly told mixed groups the
story of how a tin of penuche, sent to him by his sister when he
was stationed there during the Second Nicaraguan Campaign, and
which had acquired a thick growth of mold during its long transit
through the tropics, was eagerly consumed by him and his fellow
Horse Marines, after simply scraping the mold off.

Lee Rudolph


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