Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 27-01-2009, 11:04 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Does anyone know of a very old-fashioned tea biscuit called a cracknel?
I used to buy them from a store here in San Francisco and the store is
gone and so are the biscuits. They were very dry and crisp and had a
depression just asking to be filled with jam. Yummy memory. gorley


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Old 28-01-2009, 05:46 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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gorley williams wrote:

Does anyone know of a very old-fashioned tea biscuit called a cracknel?
I used to buy them from a store here in San Francisco and the store is
gone and so are the biscuits. They were very dry and crisp and had a
depression just asking to be filled with jam. Yummy memory. gorley


Here is a recipe from: English Housewifery Exemplified, by Elizabeth
Moxon, published in 1764. Obtained from Project Gutenberg.
It's probably not like the commercial ones you were buying What brand
were they anyway?



245. _To make_ CRACKNELS.

Take half a pound (about 2 cups) of fine flour, half a pound (about 1
cup) of sugar, two ounces (half a stick) of butter, two eggs, and a few
carraway seeds; (you must beat and sift the
sugar) then put it to your flour and work it to paste; roll them as
thin as you can, and cut them out with queen cake tins, lie them on
papers and bake them in a slow oven.

They are proper to eat with chocolate.


A slow oven usually means between about 250 and 300 F.
For papers, use baking parchment.

Have fun!
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Old 07-02-2009, 06:07 AM posted to rec.food.historic
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On 2009-01-28 09:46:52 -0800, Arri London said:



gorley williams wrote:

Does anyone know of a very old-fashioned tea biscuit called a cracknel?
I used to buy them from a store here in San Francisco and the store is
gone and so are the biscuits. They were very dry and crisp and had a
depression just asking to be filled with jam. Yummy memory. gorley


Here is a recipe from: English Housewifery Exemplified, by Elizabeth
Moxon, published in 1764. Obtained from Project Gutenberg.
It's probably not like the commercial ones you were buying What brand
were they anyway?



245. _To make_ CRACKNELS.

Take half a pound (about 2 cups) of fine flour, half a pound (about 1
cup) of sugar, two ounces (half a stick) of butter, two eggs, and a few
carraway seeds; (you must beat and sift the
sugar) then put it to your flour and work it to paste; roll them as
thin as you can, and cut them out with queen cake tins, lie them on
papers and bake them in a slow oven.

They are proper to eat with chocolate.


A slow oven usually means between about 250 and 300 F.
For papers, use baking parchment.

Have fun!


Thanks, those are not at all like what we used to buy .. ours were made
locally by the Mission Biscuit Co. and sold in their retail store. They
were sold in bulk by weight. I must try this version though. gorley



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