Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 22-01-2009, 03:31 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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And it would be nice to see more signs of life here...

I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one
in particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US
cookery. The question is what is a reasonable cut-off for
European cookbooks as part of this. Obviously, folks brought
European cookbooks to this country, and some of the European
cookbooks were reprinted here (or there were new, somewhat
modified editions for this country). When did such cookbooks stop
being a significant factor in US cookery (aside from the obvious
heritage aspect of recipes in general)?
--
Jean B.

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Old 07-02-2009, 07:31 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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"Jean B." wrote in message
...
And it would be nice to see more signs of life here...

I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as part of
this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this country, and
some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or there were new,
somewhat modified editions for this country). When did such cookbooks
stop being a significant factor in US cookery (aside from the obvious
heritage aspect of recipes in general)?
--
Jean B.


I'm not a historian by any means, nor American.... but I assume looking at
migration, you would find answers. Plenty of Irish traveled in the mid 19th
I think, and probably brought their cooking with them, having a large
influence that needed to die off. Was there large migrations to the USA
after WW1?

In all I imagine the food rationing during the depression and then WW2 would
have influenced cooking to a large degree and may be that point in time you
are looking for?


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Old 09-02-2009, 12:57 AM posted to rec.food.historic
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Peter wrote:
"Jean B." wrote in message
...
And it would be nice to see more signs of life here...

I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as part of
this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this country, and
some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or there were new,
somewhat modified editions for this country). When did such cookbooks
stop being a significant factor in US cookery (aside from the obvious
heritage aspect of recipes in general)?
--
Jean B.


I'm not a historian by any means, nor American.... but I assume looking at
migration, you would find answers. Plenty of Irish traveled in the mid 19th
I think, and probably brought their cooking with them, having a large
influence that needed to die off. Was there large migrations to the USA
after WW1?

In all I imagine the food rationing during the depression and then WW2 would
have influenced cooking to a large degree and may be that point in time you
are looking for?


That would be true, depending on how recent I want my total end
point to be. I was thinking I would end the whole thing at 1900
or 1920. (Of course, that may change, because I keep thinking of
reasons to extend the end point for my collection.)

--
Jean B.
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Old 09-02-2009, 05:58 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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"Jean B." wrote in message
...
Peter wrote:
"Jean B." wrote in message
...
And it would be nice to see more signs of life here...

I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as part
of this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this country,
and some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or there were
new, somewhat modified editions for this country). When did such
cookbooks stop being a significant factor in US cookery (aside from the
obvious heritage aspect of recipes in general)?
--
Jean B.


I'm not a historian by any means, nor American.... but I assume looking
at migration, you would find answers. Plenty of Irish traveled in the
mid 19th I think, and probably brought their cooking with them, having a
large influence that needed to die off. Was there large migrations to
the USA after WW1?

In all I imagine the food rationing during the depression and then WW2
would have influenced cooking to a large degree and may be that point in
time you are looking for?

That would be true, depending on how recent I want my total end point to
be. I was thinking I would end the whole thing at 1900 or 1920. (Of
course, that may change, because I keep thinking of reasons to extend the
end point for my collection.)

--
Jean B.




Heh, fair enough, I rarely need excuses to justify my hobbies now, I'm going
to do whatever anyways :-)

You might find some interesting info here though:
http://www.foodtimeline.org/food2.html


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Old 13-02-2009, 09:10 AM posted to rec.food.historic
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I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as
part of this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this
country, and some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or
there were new, somewhat modified editions for this country). When
did such cookbooks stop being a significant factor in US cookery
(aside from the obvious heritage aspect of recipes in general)?


I can't see many European countries managing to produce cookbooks for
the American market during WW1, so perhaps then?

Maybe you could look at adverts in newspapers to see what cookbooks
were being promoted?

==== j a c k at c a m p i n . m e . u k === http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts


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Old 13-02-2009, 02:21 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as
part of this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this
country, and some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or
there were new, somewhat modified editions for this country). When
did such cookbooks stop being a significant factor in US cookery
(aside from the obvious heritage aspect of recipes in general)?


I can't see many European countries managing to produce cookbooks for
the American market during WW1, so perhaps then?

Maybe you could look at adverts in newspapers to see what cookbooks
were being promoted?

==== j a c k at c a m p i n . m e . u k === http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts



Oh dear! That would be much later than I was thinking. And since
I posed the question and got few responses, I found myself
thinking of the 1850s, when several American cooking tomes were
published.

--
Jean B.
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Old 13-02-2009, 08:38 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Jean B. wrote:
Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
I am working on a bibliography (well, several, but right now one in
particular). My main interest (for this, anyway) is US cookery. The
question is what is a reasonable cut-off for European cookbooks as
part of this. Obviously, folks brought European cookbooks to this
country, and some of the European cookbooks were reprinted here (or
there were new, somewhat modified editions for this country). When
did such cookbooks stop being a significant factor in US cookery
(aside from the obvious heritage aspect of recipes in general)?


I can't see many European countries managing to produce cookbooks for
the American market during WW1, so perhaps then?

Maybe you could look at adverts in newspapers to see what cookbooks
were being promoted?


Oh dear! That would be much later than I was thinking. And since
I posed the question and got few responses, I found myself
thinking of the 1850s, when several American cooking tomes were
published.


I b'lieve the tide turned at the time of the publication of The Fanny
Farmer Cookbook. Wasn't she the one that standardized measures, and is
why the US measures by volume and Europe goes by weight?

B/


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