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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-12-2004, 12:55 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Marinating Fruit in Vodka?


Any suggestions as to how to do this? I'd presume that, once you
submerge fruit in alcohol, you kill off the bacteria, but I'm not sure.
How long does one want to submerge the fruit? Is there one best time
or does it depend on the type of fruit? Do most people add sugar? Is
there some sort of standard ratio or is it all to taste? Do some
fruits just not work? Is there an online or text reference for all
this? What about the jar that you put it in? Can it be anything or
should it be glass like vodka normally comes in? Thanks. I'm wanting
to get this ready for a wedding.


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Old 23-12-2004, 03:17 AM
Gunther Anderson
 
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Default

wrote:

Any suggestions as to how to do this? I'd presume that, once you
submerge fruit in alcohol, you kill off the bacteria, but I'm not sure.
How long does one want to submerge the fruit? Is there one best time
or does it depend on the type of fruit? Do most people add sugar? Is
there some sort of standard ratio or is it all to taste? Do some
fruits just not work? Is there an online or text reference for all
this? What about the jar that you put it in? Can it be anything or
should it be glass like vodka normally comes in? Thanks. I'm wanting
to get this ready for a wedding.


Paul's already pointed you at my web site (thanks muchly), but I wonder
if a liqueur is really what you're thinking of. A liqueur is what you
get when you marinate fruit in vodka and then throw away the fruit (or
use it in desserts, whatever). So it's the vodka that's the important
bit. It seems to me that for you, the fruit is the important bit.

For liqueurs, your timing and sugar content are geared toward extracting
the greatest amount of flavor from your fruits, and then adding enough
sugar to make it potable. You also tend to add other ingredients to
balance out flavors. Strictly for generating alcohol-soaked fruit, I
think the answers change. And I don't necessarily have experience there.

But let me take a guess at the answers for alcohol-soaked fruit. For
any fruit, your soaking time is going to be however long it takes to
saturate the fruit. Cut your fruit up into the size sections you want
to eat, erring on the small side, so you have as much surface area for
the vodka to soak in as possible. The time will depend pretty much
entirely on the absorptive qualities of your fruit, and experimenttion
is called for. However, precision is not.

Your real concern, by the way, is oxygen. You're right that the vodka
makes an excellent disinfectant for small and large organisms. But
oxygen, which will brown your fruit, will make both your fruit and your
liqueur taste different, and likely bad. So even in your sealed jar,
try to leave as little head-space above the fruit as possible, and
consider artificial ways of keeping the fruit below the surface (a
weighted net, for instance).

Anyway, back to your questions. I expect people don't use sugar for
fruit; the natural sugars should be more than enough. They do use
plenty for liqueurs, since the fruit's sugars aren't going to be
extracted the way the flavors are. It's all to taste. Your alcohol
quantity should be, "Fill the jar with fruit. Fill the rest of the jar
with alcohol."

For vodka-soaked fruits, any fruit you like will be fine being soaked in
vodka. For a liqueur, well, some fruits are harder to work with, but
anythin you like eating can likely be made to work one way or another.

And I strongly recommend latched glass jars with rubber gasket seals.
Plastic may be problematic if you expect to be soaking the fruit a long
time - plastic may breathe, and will certainly absorb the flavors. So
you'd be stuck with plastic that you wouldn't want to use for anything else.

If you really did mean liqueurs, budget 6 weeks beginning to end for
most fruit liqueurs. Citrus will take longer. Extract-based liqueurs
can be made overnight, but then you're stuck with the flavors you cn get
extracts for. And everybody seems to like coffee liqueurs...

Good luck,
Gunther Anderson

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-12-2004, 03:17 AM
Gunther Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:

Any suggestions as to how to do this? I'd presume that, once you
submerge fruit in alcohol, you kill off the bacteria, but I'm not sure.
How long does one want to submerge the fruit? Is there one best time
or does it depend on the type of fruit? Do most people add sugar? Is
there some sort of standard ratio or is it all to taste? Do some
fruits just not work? Is there an online or text reference for all
this? What about the jar that you put it in? Can it be anything or
should it be glass like vodka normally comes in? Thanks. I'm wanting
to get this ready for a wedding.


Paul's already pointed you at my web site (thanks muchly), but I wonder
if a liqueur is really what you're thinking of. A liqueur is what you
get when you marinate fruit in vodka and then throw away the fruit (or
use it in desserts, whatever). So it's the vodka that's the important
bit. It seems to me that for you, the fruit is the important bit.

For liqueurs, your timing and sugar content are geared toward extracting
the greatest amount of flavor from your fruits, and then adding enough
sugar to make it potable. You also tend to add other ingredients to
balance out flavors. Strictly for generating alcohol-soaked fruit, I
think the answers change. And I don't necessarily have experience there.

But let me take a guess at the answers for alcohol-soaked fruit. For
any fruit, your soaking time is going to be however long it takes to
saturate the fruit. Cut your fruit up into the size sections you want
to eat, erring on the small side, so you have as much surface area for
the vodka to soak in as possible. The time will depend pretty much
entirely on the absorptive qualities of your fruit, and experimenttion
is called for. However, precision is not.

Your real concern, by the way, is oxygen. You're right that the vodka
makes an excellent disinfectant for small and large organisms. But
oxygen, which will brown your fruit, will make both your fruit and your
liqueur taste different, and likely bad. So even in your sealed jar,
try to leave as little head-space above the fruit as possible, and
consider artificial ways of keeping the fruit below the surface (a
weighted net, for instance).

Anyway, back to your questions. I expect people don't use sugar for
fruit; the natural sugars should be more than enough. They do use
plenty for liqueurs, since the fruit's sugars aren't going to be
extracted the way the flavors are. It's all to taste. Your alcohol
quantity should be, "Fill the jar with fruit. Fill the rest of the jar
with alcohol."

For vodka-soaked fruits, any fruit you like will be fine being soaked in
vodka. For a liqueur, well, some fruits are harder to work with, but
anythin you like eating can likely be made to work one way or another.

And I strongly recommend latched glass jars with rubber gasket seals.
Plastic may be problematic if you expect to be soaking the fruit a long
time - plastic may breathe, and will certainly absorb the flavors. So
you'd be stuck with plastic that you wouldn't want to use for anything else.

If you really did mean liqueurs, budget 6 weeks beginning to end for
most fruit liqueurs. Citrus will take longer. Extract-based liqueurs
can be made overnight, but then you're stuck with the flavors you cn get
extracts for. And everybody seems to like coffee liqueurs...

Good luck,
Gunther Anderson

  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-12-2004, 08:56 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Thanks to Paul and Mister Fixit and particularly to Gunther for your
help. I was thinking about doing this with pineapple, but I'm guessing
that pineapples are out of season right now.

I did go to Gunther's site and haven't even finished reading it yet. I
had been under the impression that schnapps and liquers were basically
the same thing. I haven't developed a taste for schnapps. So, I'm glad
to learn there's other options out there.

Truth be told, what I really like in my vodka-based drinks is just
barely to taste the vodka. I don't want to mask it entirely and I
certainly want the vodka to taste good on its own terms, but I prefer
to let the fruit flavor predominate since I really, really like fruit,
especially fresh fruit juice. Pretty much my favorite alcoholic
beverages are a screwdriver with freshly squeezed orange juice or a
bloody mary with freshly made mix.

A few years ago, I went to the Capital Grille where they had this giant
jar filled with pineapples and vodka. The vodka was one of the best
things I've ever drunk and all I could think was how I'd love to get a
bowl full of the pineapple. Gunther's post now leads me to believe
that the pineapple flavor had probably been entirely leached from the
pineapples. I'm going to study his page more carefully, follow the
directions in his post, and try to make some vodka soaked pineapple.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-12-2004, 08:56 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Thanks to Paul and Mister Fixit and particularly to Gunther for your
help. I was thinking about doing this with pineapple, but I'm guessing
that pineapples are out of season right now.

I did go to Gunther's site and haven't even finished reading it yet. I
had been under the impression that schnapps and liquers were basically
the same thing. I haven't developed a taste for schnapps. So, I'm glad
to learn there's other options out there.

Truth be told, what I really like in my vodka-based drinks is just
barely to taste the vodka. I don't want to mask it entirely and I
certainly want the vodka to taste good on its own terms, but I prefer
to let the fruit flavor predominate since I really, really like fruit,
especially fresh fruit juice. Pretty much my favorite alcoholic
beverages are a screwdriver with freshly squeezed orange juice or a
bloody mary with freshly made mix.

A few years ago, I went to the Capital Grille where they had this giant
jar filled with pineapples and vodka. The vodka was one of the best
things I've ever drunk and all I could think was how I'd love to get a
bowl full of the pineapple. Gunther's post now leads me to believe
that the pineapple flavor had probably been entirely leached from the
pineapples. I'm going to study his page more carefully, follow the
directions in his post, and try to make some vodka soaked pineapple.

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-12-2004, 07:09 PM
Gunther Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:
Thanks to Paul and Mister Fixit and particularly to Gunther for your
help. I was thinking about doing this with pineapple, but I'm guessing
that pineapples are out of season right now.


Keep your eyes open - with so many southern-hemisphere growers, almost
nothing ever goes completely out of season. Except cranberries. Also,
canned pineapple sould work too, ang might make your vodka slightly
sweeter as a result.

And one other thing: a number of people I know prefer gin for soaking
things instead of vodka, so consider other alcohols if you're feeling
adventurous.

I did go to Gunther's site and haven't even finished reading it yet. I
had been under the impression that schnapps and liquers were basically
the same thing. I haven't developed a taste for schnapps. So, I'm glad
to learn there's other options out there.


Definitely worlds of difference...

A few years ago, I went to the Capital Grille where they had this giant
jar filled with pineapples and vodka. The vodka was one of the best
things I've ever drunk and all I could think was how I'd love to get a
bowl full of the pineapple. Gunther's post now leads me to believe
that the pineapple flavor had probably been entirely leached from the
pineapples. I'm going to study his page more carefully, follow the
directions in his post, and try to make some vodka soaked pineapple.


Bugaboo Creek was doing that last time I was there, too. Honestly,
there's very little to making what you want, except finding big jars to
do it in. Being lazy, I'd grab a 2-liter jar (since I have a large
collection of such jars), and put in a couple of big cans of pineapple
after I'd drained them. And maybe cut them to size if I used rings
instead of sections. Then I'd pour a 1.75L bottle of decent vodka over
top, to fill the jar. And I'd hope my pineapples sank. After a couple
of days, both the vodka and the pineapples would be fine.

I doubt that the flavor of anything could ever be leached completely
like that. The best you could ever hope for is 50/50 - equilibrium
between the fruit and the vodka. If the flavor was especially strong,
it probably means that they changed out the pineapples occasionally.

So go nuts. The worst thing that could happen is that you have to eat
(and drink) your failures. And even your failures will be tasty.

Gunther Anderson

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-12-2004, 07:09 PM
Gunther Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:
Thanks to Paul and Mister Fixit and particularly to Gunther for your
help. I was thinking about doing this with pineapple, but I'm guessing
that pineapples are out of season right now.


Keep your eyes open - with so many southern-hemisphere growers, almost
nothing ever goes completely out of season. Except cranberries. Also,
canned pineapple sould work too, ang might make your vodka slightly
sweeter as a result.

And one other thing: a number of people I know prefer gin for soaking
things instead of vodka, so consider other alcohols if you're feeling
adventurous.

I did go to Gunther's site and haven't even finished reading it yet. I
had been under the impression that schnapps and liquers were basically
the same thing. I haven't developed a taste for schnapps. So, I'm glad
to learn there's other options out there.


Definitely worlds of difference...

A few years ago, I went to the Capital Grille where they had this giant
jar filled with pineapples and vodka. The vodka was one of the best
things I've ever drunk and all I could think was how I'd love to get a
bowl full of the pineapple. Gunther's post now leads me to believe
that the pineapple flavor had probably been entirely leached from the
pineapples. I'm going to study his page more carefully, follow the
directions in his post, and try to make some vodka soaked pineapple.


Bugaboo Creek was doing that last time I was there, too. Honestly,
there's very little to making what you want, except finding big jars to
do it in. Being lazy, I'd grab a 2-liter jar (since I have a large
collection of such jars), and put in a couple of big cans of pineapple
after I'd drained them. And maybe cut them to size if I used rings
instead of sections. Then I'd pour a 1.75L bottle of decent vodka over
top, to fill the jar. And I'd hope my pineapples sank. After a couple
of days, both the vodka and the pineapples would be fine.

I doubt that the flavor of anything could ever be leached completely
like that. The best you could ever hope for is 50/50 - equilibrium
between the fruit and the vodka. If the flavor was especially strong,
it probably means that they changed out the pineapples occasionally.

So go nuts. The worst thing that could happen is that you have to eat
(and drink) your failures. And even your failures will be tasty.

Gunther Anderson

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-12-2004, 05:57 AM
Mister Fixit
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 13:09:40 -0500, Gunther Anderson
wrote:

wrote:
Thanks to Paul and Mister Fixit and particularly to Gunther for your
help. I was thinking about doing this with pineapple, but I'm guessing
that pineapples are out of season right now.


Keep your eyes open - with so many southern-hemisphere growers, almost
nothing ever goes completely out of season. Except cranberries. Also,
canned pineapple sould work too, ang might make your vodka slightly
sweeter as a result.

I just bought a fresh pineapple yesterday.

And one other thing: a number of people I know prefer gin for soaking
things instead of vodka, so consider other alcohols if you're feeling
adventurous.

My ouzo cherries had mixed results, if they liked Ouzo they loved the
cherries, if not, not.

Captain Morgan cherries are the most popular with my friends, but we
all like the Captain. Use a flavor of drink that you already enjoy.

I did go to Gunther's site and haven't even finished reading it yet. I
had been under the impression that schnapps and liquers were basically
the same thing. I haven't developed a taste for schnapps. So, I'm glad
to learn there's other options out there.


Definitely worlds of difference...

A few years ago, I went to the Capital Grille where they had this giant
jar filled with pineapples and vodka. The vodka was one of the best
things I've ever drunk and all I could think was how I'd love to get a
bowl full of the pineapple. Gunther's post now leads me to believe
that the pineapple flavor had probably been entirely leached from the
pineapples. I'm going to study his page more carefully, follow the
directions in his post, and try to make some vodka soaked pineapple.


Bugaboo Creek was doing that last time I was there, too. Honestly,
there's very little to making what you want, except finding big jars to
do it in. Being lazy, I'd grab a 2-liter jar (since I have a large
collection of such jars), and put in a couple of big cans of pineapple
after I'd drained them. And maybe cut them to size if I used rings
instead of sections. Then I'd pour a 1.75L bottle of decent vodka over
top, to fill the jar. And I'd hope my pineapples sank. After a couple
of days, both the vodka and the pineapples would be fine.

I doubt that the flavor of anything could ever be leached completely
like that. The best you could ever hope for is 50/50 - equilibrium
between the fruit and the vodka. If the flavor was especially strong,
it probably means that they changed out the pineapples occasionally.

So go nuts. The worst thing that could happen is that you have to eat
(and drink) your failures. And even your failures will be tasty.

Gunther Anderson




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 06:38 AM
Skinny
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 04:57:05 GMT, Mister Fixit wrote:

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 13:09:40 -0500, Gunther Anderson
wrote:


/snip/

And one other thing: a number of people I know prefer gin for soaking
things instead of vodka, so consider other alcohols if you're feeling
adventurous.

My ouzo cherries had mixed results, if they liked Ouzo they loved the
cherries, if not, not.

Captain Morgan cherries are the most popular with my friends, but we
all like the Captain. Use a flavor of drink that you already enjoy.



Since I'm on a diabetic diet (low-carb), my interest is to try to ferment
some of the 'sugar' in the fruit, while keeping the fruit's natural taste
and texture. Adding alcohol is ok, as it's less of a problem than 'sugar'.

Any ideas on that? Can it be done by using wine or rum or such as a starter?


Skinny
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:50 PM
Gunther Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Skinny wrote:

Since I'm on a diabetic diet (low-carb), my interest is to try to ferment
some of the 'sugar' in the fruit, while keeping the fruit's natural taste
and texture. Adding alcohol is ok, as it's less of a problem than 'sugar'.

Any ideas on that? Can it be done by using wine or rum or such as a starter?


Shouldn't be possible, near as I can tell. Fermentation (conversion of
sugar to alcohol) is the exclusive province of yeasts, and you'd have to
find a way to get the yeasts all through your fruit without destroying
it in the process. Wine is what you get when you do destroy the fruit.
Without crushing the fruit, your yeasts are going to be at best able
to scrounge a few sugar molecules off the exposed surfaces. Maybe that
process would chew up that surface enough to let the yeasts further in,
but your fruit will turn to mush.

Now's the time to get into genetic engineering, and see if you can
develop a fruit that stores its sugars as sucralose instead of fructose...

You can make low-carb (but not carb-free) liqueurs, I expect, by using
regular fruit but using sucralose (Splenda) as your sweetening agent.
Then you only get the sugars from the fruit. Should cut your sugar
intake by more than half. It would cut it even more if you used
extracts instead of fruits.

Gunther Anderson

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:50 PM
Gunther Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Skinny wrote:

Since I'm on a diabetic diet (low-carb), my interest is to try to ferment
some of the 'sugar' in the fruit, while keeping the fruit's natural taste
and texture. Adding alcohol is ok, as it's less of a problem than 'sugar'.

Any ideas on that? Can it be done by using wine or rum or such as a starter?


Shouldn't be possible, near as I can tell. Fermentation (conversion of
sugar to alcohol) is the exclusive province of yeasts, and you'd have to
find a way to get the yeasts all through your fruit without destroying
it in the process. Wine is what you get when you do destroy the fruit.
Without crushing the fruit, your yeasts are going to be at best able
to scrounge a few sugar molecules off the exposed surfaces. Maybe that
process would chew up that surface enough to let the yeasts further in,
but your fruit will turn to mush.

Now's the time to get into genetic engineering, and see if you can
develop a fruit that stores its sugars as sucralose instead of fructose...

You can make low-carb (but not carb-free) liqueurs, I expect, by using
regular fruit but using sucralose (Splenda) as your sweetening agent.
Then you only get the sugars from the fruit. Should cut your sugar
intake by more than half. It would cut it even more if you used
extracts instead of fruits.

Gunther Anderson

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-01-2005, 03:57 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've infused both vodka and tequila with fruit. Choose your fruit
carefully - pineapple works really well, and the fruit is nice and firm so
it doesn't break down for a long time. Citrus fruits are good too, but they
start looking nasty after a week or so. Berries are too delicate, plus
their juice and pulp makes the stuff look yuck.

Here's my technique for pineapple infusted vodka:

Get a large, open mouth 1 liter glass jar with a cap that seals. (Try
Target or Pier one). Wash it well.

Get one large, ripe pinepple. Remove the skin, core the fruit, and cut into
one inch chunks. Put the all of the chunks in the jar.

Pour one 750ml bottle of good quality vodka in the jar, covering the fruit.
Since you're flavoring it up don't use Grey Goose or any other top shelf
brand. On the other had, don't use the cheap stuff either. Abosult works
well for me.

Seal the jar, and set it on your kitchen counter for 4 or 5 days, stirring
every day or so. After five days, chill in the fridge, and drink straight
in a martini glass, garnishing with a piece of the pineapple. I don't know
which is better, the vodka or the fruit.Yum.

For variation, you can also add of these items to further punch up the
taste:
*a natural vanilla bean, split lengthwise
*a couple of teaspoons of bar syrup or some white sugar to sweeten
*Use pre-flavored vodkas - Absolut Vanilla, or raspberry or citrus. This
tend to blend and mask with the pineapple, but they're fun anyway.

Let me know what you think!



wrote in message
oups.com...

Any suggestions as to how to do this? I'd presume that, once you
submerge fruit in alcohol, you kill off the bacteria, but I'm not sure.
How long does one want to submerge the fruit? Is there one best time
or does it depend on the type of fruit? Do most people add sugar? Is
there some sort of standard ratio or is it all to taste? Do some
fruits just not work? Is there an online or text reference for all
this? What about the jar that you put it in? Can it be anything or
should it be glass like vodka normally comes in? Thanks. I'm wanting
to get this ready for a wedding.




  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-01-2005, 03:57 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've infused both vodka and tequila with fruit. Choose your fruit
carefully - pineapple works really well, and the fruit is nice and firm so
it doesn't break down for a long time. Citrus fruits are good too, but they
start looking nasty after a week or so. Berries are too delicate, plus
their juice and pulp makes the stuff look yuck.

Here's my technique for pineapple infusted vodka:

Get a large, open mouth 1 liter glass jar with a cap that seals. (Try
Target or Pier one). Wash it well.

Get one large, ripe pinepple. Remove the skin, core the fruit, and cut into
one inch chunks. Put the all of the chunks in the jar.

Pour one 750ml bottle of good quality vodka in the jar, covering the fruit.
Since you're flavoring it up don't use Grey Goose or any other top shelf
brand. On the other had, don't use the cheap stuff either. Abosult works
well for me.

Seal the jar, and set it on your kitchen counter for 4 or 5 days, stirring
every day or so. After five days, chill in the fridge, and drink straight
in a martini glass, garnishing with a piece of the pineapple. I don't know
which is better, the vodka or the fruit.Yum.

For variation, you can also add of these items to further punch up the
taste:
*a natural vanilla bean, split lengthwise
*a couple of teaspoons of bar syrup or some white sugar to sweeten
*Use pre-flavored vodkas - Absolut Vanilla, or raspberry or citrus. This
tend to blend and mask with the pineapple, but they're fun anyway.

Let me know what you think!



wrote in message
oups.com...

Any suggestions as to how to do this? I'd presume that, once you
submerge fruit in alcohol, you kill off the bacteria, but I'm not sure.
How long does one want to submerge the fruit? Is there one best time
or does it depend on the type of fruit? Do most people add sugar? Is
there some sort of standard ratio or is it all to taste? Do some
fruits just not work? Is there an online or text reference for all
this? What about the jar that you put it in? Can it be anything or
should it be glass like vodka normally comes in? Thanks. I'm wanting
to get this ready for a wedding.






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