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Old 13-12-2004, 04:07 AM
 
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Default chilling soda water?

Anyone have any ways of chilling soda water once it's gone through the
carbonator and before it gets dispensed out of a soda gun?

I'm thinking about perhaps trying one of those office water cooler
units. Most of them have a stainless steel or plastic resivior for the
water so there won't be any copper or brass that will touch the soda
water.

I was also thinking of a small fridge with a 20 foot coil of SS
tubing in it or even putting the carbonator tank into the mini fridge.
Any thoughts?

thanks all!
Mike B


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Old 15-12-2004, 09:17 AM
Richard J Kinch
 
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Default

Brett Hetherington writes:

Your best bet would probably be the small fridge, although you'll want
to immerse the coil in a bucket of water, since the cold air in the
fridge does not contain enough mass to cool much more than the first
few squirts.


Nope. Flash chilling requires a reservoir of phase-change heat sink:
melting ice, boiling refrigerant. Thermal mass (heat exchanger in contact
with air or water) will not flash chill.
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Old 16-12-2004, 09:10 AM
Brett Hetherington
 
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It'll work as long as the OP doesn't expect to put too much volume through
it.
I was not thinking of flash cooling. I assumed that the coil would be of
some length, say 25 feet, plenty of time to cool a reasonable amount of
soda water. A 5 gallon bucket of refrigerated water represents a heat sink
to be reckoned with, given enough surface area.
Of course, the best method for the op would be to invest in soda kegs and a
refrigerator so he could batch carbonate. I have a commercial carbonator,
and realized quickly that it was serious overkill. But trying to tell a man
with a mission he's on the wrong track is like ****ing on a house fire...

-Brett

Richard J Kinch drunkenly bellowed in
:


Nope. Flash chilling requires a reservoir of phase-change heat sink:
melting ice, boiling refrigerant. Thermal mass (heat exchanger in
contact with air or water) will not flash chill.




--
"They who drink beer will think beer."
-Washington Irving


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Old 16-12-2004, 09:10 AM
Brett Hetherington
 
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Default

It'll work as long as the OP doesn't expect to put too much volume through
it.
I was not thinking of flash cooling. I assumed that the coil would be of
some length, say 25 feet, plenty of time to cool a reasonable amount of
soda water. A 5 gallon bucket of refrigerated water represents a heat sink
to be reckoned with, given enough surface area.
Of course, the best method for the op would be to invest in soda kegs and a
refrigerator so he could batch carbonate. I have a commercial carbonator,
and realized quickly that it was serious overkill. But trying to tell a man
with a mission he's on the wrong track is like ****ing on a house fire...

-Brett

Richard J Kinch drunkenly bellowed in
:


Nope. Flash chilling requires a reservoir of phase-change heat sink:
melting ice, boiling refrigerant. Thermal mass (heat exchanger in
contact with air or water) will not flash chill.




--
"They who drink beer will think beer."
-Washington Irving
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Old 22-12-2004, 06:22 AM
Richard J Kinch
 
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Default

Brett Hetherington writes:

It'll work as long as the OP doesn't expect to put too much volume
through it.


"Too much", unfortunately, is less than even a single serving.

A 5 gallon bucket of refrigerated water represents a heat sink
to be reckoned with, given enough surface area.


No, because it's temperature rises, as does the output, as it is used.

You need a phase-change source to have controlled output temperatures.
Every commercial beverage chiller works on this principle.

Thermal-mass chilling is inefficient and costly per unit of delivery.
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Old 22-12-2004, 06:22 AM
Richard J Kinch
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Brett Hetherington writes:

It'll work as long as the OP doesn't expect to put too much volume
through it.


"Too much", unfortunately, is less than even a single serving.

A 5 gallon bucket of refrigerated water represents a heat sink
to be reckoned with, given enough surface area.


No, because it's temperature rises, as does the output, as it is used.

You need a phase-change source to have controlled output temperatures.
Every commercial beverage chiller works on this principle.

Thermal-mass chilling is inefficient and costly per unit of delivery.


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