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Old 21-11-2004, 10:01 PM
Robert
 
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Default Difference between Port and Sherry?

Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries? I know that both are higher alcohol desert wines, and both
seem to be made from adding brandy to red wine.

If I understand correct, "Port" is supposed to be used only for wines of
this nature made in the western region of Portugal. Are Sherries simply
Ports made outside of this region, or is there another difference?


Robert




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Old 22-11-2004, 10:10 AM
Matt Probert
 
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Default

Once upon a time, far far away, the king summoned "Robert"
who replied:

Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries? I know that both are higher alcohol desert wines, and both
seem to be made from adding brandy to red wine.

If I understand correct, "Port" is supposed to be used only for wines of
this nature made in the western region of Portugal. Are Sherries simply
Ports made outside of this region, or is there another difference?


Port and Sherry are simply (or not so simply g) two types of
fortified wine. The process of making them, however, is very
different. Port is (generally) made from red wine fortified with
brandy.

Sherry, however, is made from white wine which has been fully
fermented until dry and undergoes a very sophisticated process that
includes aging in large butts, and sometimes sweetening with sun-dried

grapes of a single specific variety.

Port is made in one small region of Portugal, Sherry in a small region
of Spain.

You may like to know, that fortified wines were invented by the
English during the 17th century. Some wines had brandy added to them
so as to preserve them on the long sea journey back to England,
others, such as Madeira, were accidentally discovered to improve with
the journey. Indeed early Madeira wines after being collected were
sent on a cruise to Indonesia before returning to England! Which has
to be one of the oddest manufacturing processes of all time?

Matt

--
If your encyclopaedia doesn't list "widget glass", you're reading the wrong encyclopaedia.
The Probert Encyclopaedia. Its not the same.
http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com
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Old 22-11-2004, 07:09 PM
DrinkBoy
 
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Default

"Robert" asks...
Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries?...

-----------------------------------

Both Port and Sherry are "fortified wines", but they aren't the same
thing much beyond that. Yes, Port is a product of Portugal, and Sherry
is a product of Spain, specifically the Jerez de la Frontera region.

While Port will traditionally carry vintage year designations (and
there is a lot of strange marketing politics behind this), Sherry does
not. Sherry is almost always the result of a blend of different
vintages and types of wine, which will produce a consistant result
from year to year. Vintage Port on the other hand is strictly
controled and reflects individual characters of a partidular year.
Ruby and Tawny ports can be blends, and therefor won't have a vintage
designation at all.

I've got a little more information that I've compiled on my website:
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Sherry.html
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Port.html

-Robert Hess
www.DrinkBoy.com
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Old 22-11-2004, 07:09 PM
DrinkBoy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Robert" asks...
Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries?...

-----------------------------------

Both Port and Sherry are "fortified wines", but they aren't the same
thing much beyond that. Yes, Port is a product of Portugal, and Sherry
is a product of Spain, specifically the Jerez de la Frontera region.

While Port will traditionally carry vintage year designations (and
there is a lot of strange marketing politics behind this), Sherry does
not. Sherry is almost always the result of a blend of different
vintages and types of wine, which will produce a consistant result
from year to year. Vintage Port on the other hand is strictly
controled and reflects individual characters of a partidular year.
Ruby and Tawny ports can be blends, and therefor won't have a vintage
designation at all.

I've got a little more information that I've compiled on my website:
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Sherry.html
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Port.html

-Robert Hess
www.DrinkBoy.com
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Old 22-11-2004, 07:09 PM
DrinkBoy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Robert" asks...
Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries?...

-----------------------------------

Both Port and Sherry are "fortified wines", but they aren't the same
thing much beyond that. Yes, Port is a product of Portugal, and Sherry
is a product of Spain, specifically the Jerez de la Frontera region.

While Port will traditionally carry vintage year designations (and
there is a lot of strange marketing politics behind this), Sherry does
not. Sherry is almost always the result of a blend of different
vintages and types of wine, which will produce a consistant result
from year to year. Vintage Port on the other hand is strictly
controled and reflects individual characters of a partidular year.
Ruby and Tawny ports can be blends, and therefor won't have a vintage
designation at all.

I've got a little more information that I've compiled on my website:
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Sherry.html
http://www.drinkboy.com/LiquorCabinet/Wines/Port.html

-Robert Hess
www.DrinkBoy.com


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Old 25-11-2004, 12:51 PM
Robert
 
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Default

Robert and Matt, thank you very much for your informative and useful
replies!


Cheers,

Robert


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 12:51 PM
Robert
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Robert and Matt, thank you very much for your informative and useful
replies!


Cheers,

Robert


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 12:51 PM
Robert
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Robert and Matt, thank you very much for your informative and useful
replies!


Cheers,

Robert


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 08:00 PM
Nico
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Robert" wrote in message ...
Robert and Matt, thank you very much for your informative and useful
replies!


Cheers,

Robert


cheers
Nico
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 08:00 PM
Nico
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Robert" wrote in message ...
Robert and Matt, thank you very much for your informative and useful
replies!


Cheers,

Robert


cheers
Nico


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2004, 09:24 AM
ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

se (Matt Probert) wrote in message ...
Once upon a time, far far away, the king summoned "Robert"
who replied:

Could someone reccomend a website explaining the difference between Ports
and Sherries? I know that both are higher alcohol desert wines, and both
seem to be made from adding brandy to red wine.

If I understand correct, "Port" is supposed to be used only for wines of
this nature made in the western region of Portugal. Are Sherries simply
Ports made outside of this region, or is there another difference?


Port and Sherry are simply (or not so simply g) two types of
fortified wine. The process of making them, however, is very
different. Port is (generally) made from red wine fortified with
brandy.

Sherry, however, is made from white wine which has been fully
fermented until dry and undergoes a very sophisticated process that
includes aging in large butts, and sometimes sweetening with sun-dried

grapes of a single specific variety.

Port is made in one small region of Portugal, Sherry in a small region
of Spain.

You may like to know, that fortified wines were invented by the
English during the 17th century. Some wines had brandy added to them
so as to preserve them on the long sea journey back to England,
others, such as Madeira, were accidentally discovered to improve with
the journey. Indeed early Madeira wines after being collected were
sent on a cruise to Indonesia before returning to England! Which has
to be one of the oddest manufacturing processes of all time?

Matt


These two fortified wines are quite good but England has its own
unique brand, buckfast


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