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Old 07-02-2010, 03:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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notbob replied to sf about gin:

I'm not impressed with Plymouth though; it doesn't have any flavor.


I call it the Greygoose Syndrome. Refine it to the point it has
absolutely no flavor whatsoever, so then the X&Y gens will drink it
and consider themselves cool.

I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.


Try Boodles. My fave martini gin.


I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since it seems
to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make sense to have
different gins for different drinks. For example, based on what I've read
recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be good for gin & tonic,
but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.

In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a much
greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized; manufacturers are
departing quite strongly from the traditional idea of what a gin is supposed
to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of Citadelle and a bottle of some
off-brand which I was hoping would taste of juniper and little else.)

Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as gin:
It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side notes from other
flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different from English gin. To start
with, it's often brown in color, and deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch
gin is served neat in ceramic cups which are filled to the point where
surface tension causes the gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But
today's gin producers are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in
gin to the point where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call
the products "gin".

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.

Bob


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Old 07-02-2010, 05:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.


If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

http://www.southgin.com

Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
the product!)

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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Old 07-02-2010, 06:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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Miche wrote:
In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.


If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

http://www.southgin.com

Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
the product!)

I prefer my own however it is drinkable
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 "atec
wrote:

Miche wrote:
In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.


If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

http://www.southgin.com

Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
the product!)

I prefer my own however it is drinkable


Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland


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Old 07-02-2010, 09:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 19:15:32 +1000, atec 77 "atec
wrote:

wrote:
On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 "atec
wrote:

Miche wrote:
In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.
If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

http://www.southgin.com

Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
the product!)

I prefer my own however it is drinkable


Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland


I seem to have tried it somewhere , but it's weak at only 50% or so by
volume and I prefer a stronger drop for economy of time



Have you tried the Bulgarian Absinthe at 85% abv? Drinking that neat
is only a quicker way to get trollied, it's a real tastebud wrecker.
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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Posts: 40
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wrote:
On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 19:15:32 +1000, atec 77 "atec
wrote:

wrote:
On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 16:50:06 +1000, atec 77 "atec
wrote:

Miche wrote:
In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g., Beefeater,
Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can expound on the
qualities of those gins. I am familiar with Tanqueray and Bombay Sapphire,
but neither of them strike me as something I need to seek out and consume on
a regular basis. I might just have to buy "airline" bottles of several
brands to take notes on how they differ. I'm particularly interested in the
Anchor gins (they make both a Dutch and English version), in the Rogue
Spirits' gins (both the spruce and the pink spruce), and in the Hendrick's
gins.
If you can get it, try South Gin, made in New Zealand. I rather like
it. It's my preferred choice for gin and tonic.

http://www.southgin.com

Miche (no connection with the company other than as a happy consumer of
the product!)

I prefer my own however it is drinkable
Try Blackwoods, made in Shetland


I seem to have tried it somewhere , but it's weak at only 50% or so by
volume and I prefer a stronger drop for economy of time



Have you tried the Bulgarian Absinthe at 85% abv?

No cant say I have but I made some Absinthe years back at 90% by volume
ended to make one pray a little
Drinking that neat
is only a quicker way to get trollied, it's a real tastebud wrecker.

I stick to my Bourbon these days , over ice with a little something to
thin it a very palatable drop after aging a couple of months
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.drink
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Posts: 4,127
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"Bob Terwilliger" wrote in message

notbob replied to sf about gin:

I'm not impressed with Plymouth though; it doesn't have any flavor.


I call it the Greygoose Syndrome. Refine it to the point it has
absolutely no flavor whatsoever, so then the X&Y gens will drink it
and consider themselves cool.

I'll stick with Bombay Sapphire.


Try Boodles. My fave martini gin.


I think it's interesting that notbob specified "martini" gin, since
it seems to me that gins vary so much that it might actually make
sense to have different gins for different drinks. For example, based
on what I've read recently I think the new Tanqueray Rangpur might be
good for gin & tonic, but not as good for Ramos gin fizzes.

In shopping for Delilah ingredients last week I found that there's a
much greater range of flavors in gins than I'd realized;
manufacturers are departing quite strongly from the traditional idea
of what a gin is supposed to be. (I ended up buying a bottle of
Citadelle and a bottle of some off-brand which I was hoping would
taste of juniper and little else.)
Until last week, I thought that gin could be broken down into two main
types: English and Dutch. English gin is what most people think of as
gin: It's a white spirit mainly flavored with juniper, with side
notes from other flavoring agents. Dutch gin is markedly different
from English gin. To start with, it's often brown in color, and
deeper in flavor. Traditionally, Dutch gin is served neat in ceramic
cups which are filled to the point where surface tension causes the
gin to bow out above the rim of the cup. But today's gin producers
are starting to emphasize the non-juniper flavors in gin to the point
where it's debatable whether it's still appropriate to call the
products "gin".
I don't know the difference between the top-selling gins, e.g.,
Beefeater, Gilbey's, Gordon's, or Seagram's; maybe someone here can
expound on the qualities of those gins.


I am unable to detect any real difference among those three and they all
make perfectly good gin and limes. I have tried very expensive gins when
friends offer but I really see little difference.

--
Jim Silverton
Potomac, Maryland



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