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Old 20-06-2006, 04:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

I'd never been crazy about cold soups, but it seems that I just never had
*good* cold soups before. Last Friday I brought cold borscht to work, and I
liked it a lot. Yesterday I brought another cold soup (cream of zucchini
with sunflower greens), and I *loved* it. Today I brought white gazpacho,
and I'm enjoying it as I write this. (White gazpacho is a kind of almond
milk with garlic and peeled white grapes. The recipe originates in Spain,
same as "normal" gazpacho. Martha Stewart has a cucumber-based soup that
she CALLS white gazpacho, but I think it's just named that because it's
cold.)

In the brutally hot weather we get around Sacramento, cold soups make a lot
more sense than hot this time of year. It's also easy and practical to take
them into work, as I've been doing, and I don't need a microwave to make
them palatable. They'll be a regular part of my cooking repertoire from now
on. I'm glad I broke free of my prejudice against them! Anybody out there
have a favorite cold soup to recommend?

Bob



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Old 20-06-2006, 05:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

Bob-
I live in Sacramento too. . .My favorite cold soup recipe follows.

Myrl Jeffcoat
http://www.myrljeffcoat.com


**************************
Gazpacho

1 C. finely chopped peeled tomatoes
½ C. finely chopped green sweet peppers
½ C. finely chopped celery
½ C. finely chopped cucumber
¼ C. minced onion
2 tsp. chopped parsley
1 tsp. chopped chives
1 small clove of garlic, pressed
2 tbsp. tarragon vinegar
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 C. tomato or V/8 juice

Combine all ingredients in a glass bowl and blend well. Cover tightly
and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve in chilled cups with fried
croutons.

You may liquefy in blender if desired. This will make about 6 servings.

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Old 20-06-2006, 06:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

Myrl wrote:

I live in Sacramento too. . .My favorite cold soup recipe follows.

Gazpacho

1 C. finely chopped peeled tomatoes
1/2 C. finely chopped green sweet peppers
1/2 C. finely chopped celery
1/2 C. finely chopped cucumber
1/4 C. minced onion
2 tsp. chopped parsley
1 tsp. chopped chives
1 small clove of garlic, pressed
2 tbsp. tarragon vinegar
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 C. tomato or V/8 juice

Combine all ingredients in a glass bowl and blend well. Cover tightly
and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve in chilled cups with fried
croutons.

You may liquefy in blender if desired. This will make about 6 servings.



I'm going to try that this week. But I'm going to tweak it to reflect what
I've got: Rather than finely chopped peeled tomatoes I'm going to use
quartered cherry tomatoes. And I'm going to use marjoram vinegar instead of
tarragon vinegar.

Thanks for the recipe!

Bob


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Old 20-06-2006, 01:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups


Bob Terwilliger wrote:
I'd never been crazy about cold soups, but it seems that I just never had
*good* cold soups before. Last Friday I brought cold borscht to work, and I
liked it a lot. Yesterday I brought another cold soup (cream of zucchini
with sunflower greens), and I *loved* it. Today I brought white gazpacho,
and I'm enjoying it as I write this. (White gazpacho is a kind of almond
milk with garlic and peeled white grapes. The recipe originates in Spain,
same as "normal" gazpacho. Martha Stewart has a cucumber-based soup that
she CALLS white gazpacho, but I think it's just named that because it's
cold.)

In the brutally hot weather we get around Sacramento, cold soups make a lot
more sense than hot this time of year. It's also easy and practical to take
them into work, as I've been doing, and I don't need a microwave to make
them palatable. They'll be a regular part of my cooking repertoire from now
on. I'm glad I broke free of my prejudice against them! Anybody out there
have a favorite cold soup to recommend?

Bob


We make a lot of cold cucumber soup in the summer (when the CSA package
is providing 6-8 cucumbers a week). The recipe calls for kirby
cucumbers, but I use what I have on hand. If the cucumbers are very
large, I cut the seeds out.

Cold Cream of Cucumber with Dill and Yogurt

6 Kirby (or pickling) cucumbers, each about 5 inches long, ends
trimmed, unpeeled, cut into large chunks
3-4 sour dill pickles
2 Cups plain low-fat yogurt
2 Cups heavy (whipping) cream
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill
salt and pepper
Fresh dill sprigs for garnish

Put the cucumber, pickles, yogurt, cream, lemon juice and chopped dill
in a food processor fitted with the metal blade and process until the
vegetables are finely chopped. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

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Old 20-06-2006, 07:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups


"Bob Terwilliger" wrote in message
...
Myrl wrote:

I live in Sacramento too. . .My favorite cold soup recipe follows.

Gazpacho

1 C. finely chopped peeled tomatoes
1/2 C. finely chopped green sweet peppers
1/2 C. finely chopped celery
1/2 C. finely chopped cucumber
1/4 C. minced onion
2 tsp. chopped parsley
1 tsp. chopped chives
1 small clove of garlic, pressed
2 tbsp. tarragon vinegar
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 C. tomato or V/8 juice

Combine all ingredients in a glass bowl and blend well. Cover tightly
and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve in chilled cups with fried
croutons.

You may liquefy in blender if desired. This will make about 6 servings.



I'm going to try that this week. But I'm going to tweak it to reflect what
I've got: Rather than finely chopped peeled tomatoes I'm going to use
quartered cherry tomatoes. And I'm going to use marjoram vinegar instead
of
tarragon vinegar.

Thanks for the recipe!


I love gazpacho too. But I think I'll wait for decent tomatoes to hit the
stands. Living in Sacramento (yeah, there are a few of us!), you'd think
the grocery stores would be full to the brim with fabulous tomatoes. Not
so. Only place to buy em is at the farmer's market -- or pick em from the
back yard!

TammyM




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Old 20-06-2006, 09:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

I bought some cold soup at Whole Foods last week,
it was good, the ingredients are fresh, no complaints at
all ... it just wasn't what I had in mind. Before anyone
says what's wrong with you, didn't you read the ingredients???,

No, I didn't. It was an impulse purchase, thought I'd try it.

Anyone have a cold soup recipe that would be called
Cucumber Yogurt that would not include cilantro, maybe not
red onion, most assuredly not honeydew melon?

Otherwise do you just whirl together cucumber, yogurt
and mint/salt/whatever?

nancy (not so big on cold soups, either)


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Old 20-06-2006, 09:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups


"Bob Terwilliger" schreef in bericht
...
I'd never been crazy about cold soups, but it seems that I just never had
*good* cold soups before. Last Friday I brought cold borscht to work, and
I
liked it a lot. Yesterday I brought another cold soup (cream of zucchini
with sunflower greens), and I *loved* it. Today I brought white gazpacho,
and I'm enjoying it as I write this. (White gazpacho is a kind of almond
milk with garlic and peeled white grapes. The recipe originates in Spain,
same as "normal" gazpacho. Martha Stewart has a cucumber-based soup that
she CALLS white gazpacho, but I think it's just named that because it's
cold.)

In the brutally hot weather we get around Sacramento, cold soups make a
lot
more sense than hot this time of year. It's also easy and practical to
take
them into work, as I've been doing, and I don't need a microwave to make
them palatable. They'll be a regular part of my cooking repertoire from
now
on. I'm glad I broke free of my prejudice against them! Anybody out there
have a favorite cold soup to recommend?

Bob

I don't have an actual recipe (I wing it), but there are Turkish yogurt
soups that are served cold. They may include cumin, or go the dill or
parsley way. Uusually made with veg stock. Things to give it more body could
be cooked lentils or barley. I guess you could also top it with (garlicky or
parpika-ey) croutons. Or serve with flat bread.

The soup is cooked without the yogurt, then cooled. Finally, the yogurt is
stirred in.


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Old 20-06-2006, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

I don't have an actual recipe (I wing it), but there are Turkish yogurt
soups that are served cold. They may include cumin, or go the dill or
parsley way. Uusually made with veg stock. Things to give it more body
could be cooked lentils or barley. I guess you could also top it with
(garlicky or parpika-ey) croutons. Or serve with flat bread.

The soup is cooked without the yogurt, then cooled. Finally, the yogurt is
stirred in.


Just remembered, there is also chlodnik (or chlodnik litewski). Think
borscht with yogurt os sour cream. Nice with a boiled egg in the middle or
with some chives. Learned that in Krakow 2 weeks ago. Will post my eating
exeperiences from there as soon as I get the chance to write them down.


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Old 21-06-2006, 01:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

Michael wrote:

this is one of my all time favorites and I do use chicken stock (if I have
some made) instead of water.


I had to smile at this. An episode of "Emeril Live" featured Julia Child as
a guest, and Emeril wanted to make vichyssoise. He remarked to the audience
that using chicken stock provided more flavor to the soup, and Julia
immediately chided him for it, saying that the soup has a much more "pure"
taste if you use water as in the recipe.

'Course you like your martinis dirty, so maybe purity isn't all that
important to you. :-)

Bob


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Old 21-06-2006, 02:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

TammyM wrote:

I love gazpacho too. But I think I'll wait for decent tomatoes to hit the
stands. Living in Sacramento (yeah, there are a few of us!), you'd think
the grocery stores would be full to the brim with fabulous tomatoes. Not
so. Only place to buy em is at the farmer's market -- or pick em from the
back yard!


I just got three pints of cherry tomatoes from the CSA farm. :-Þ

We briefly discussed Sacramento-area CSA's on this list, and you expressed
some interest. Did you decide not to do it this year?

Bob




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Old 21-06-2006, 02:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

Nancy wrote:

Anyone have a cold soup recipe that would be called
Cucumber Yogurt that would not include cilantro, maybe not
red onion, most assuredly not honeydew melon?

Otherwise do you just whirl together cucumber, yogurt
and mint/salt/whatever?


Cucumber, yogurt, mint, salt, white pepper, garlic (roasted if possible),
cumin, and some kind of liquid to thin it further. Water, whey from making
paneer, chicken stock, or buttermilk would work. If you want to put forth a
little more effort, you can make a strongly-flavored "tomato water" by
puréeing tomatoes and then straining them through a coffee filter.

Bob


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Old 21-06-2006, 02:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Warming Up To Cold Soups

Tammy and Bob (Sacramentans)
Have you been to the Farmer's Market that is at Sunrise Mall on
Saturday mornings? I love their produce, vegetables, and fruits.
Superb quality, great prices. . .usually!

Myrl Jeffcoat
http://www.myrljeffcoat.com

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Old 21-06-2006, 02:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Bob - What's the CSA farm?

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Old 21-06-2006, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Myrl wrote:

Tammy and Bob (Sacramentans)
Have you been to the Farmer's Market that is at Sunrise Mall on
Saturday mornings? I love their produce, vegetables, and fruits.
Superb quality, great prices. . .usually!


I've heard that there WAS one, but I'd heard it was on Sundays, and when I
drove out on Sunday morning, nobody was there. No wonder; I was there on the
wrong day!

Only thing is, I'll be hitting that market after I hit the Farmer's Markets
in Lincoln (where I live), Auburn (where I get the best peaches), and
Rocklin (where I got an incredible artichoke-pesto bread). Like I needed
ANOTHER Saturday-morning market!

Bob


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Old 21-06-2006, 02:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Myrl wrote:

Bob - What's the CSA farm?


Here's what I posted here a week ago in response to Tammy asking the same
thing:

www.naturaltradingco.com/home.html is the web site for my CSA farm.
According to localharvest.org, the Natural Trading Company does have drop
points in Sacramento, but you'd have to contact them to make sure.

There are CSA's closer to you; check out http://tinyurl.com/lzxga. If I
lived in Sacramento I'd definitely be interested in Eatwell Farm in Dixon,
since it's year-round. Most of the CSA's around here are only 20 weeks
long.


Bob




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