General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests

I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around, everyone
was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the husband, who was served
some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops of different flavors of ice
cream. The wife, after she sat down, explained that her husband didn't like
chocolate, but with six people for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying
a chocolate cake.

This sort of thing has happened before at dinners at this house. With salad,
veggies, and soup, that I can recall. The husband is very picky.

Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either offer
choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to just
decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that wasn't
offered to everyone else.

But I don't live with a picky eater, so maybe it just seems odd to me
because I'm not used to it. Maybe if you live with someone like that long
enough, it's routine for them to get a separate item and you don't think
about it any more.

But it also seems odd that the wife acknowledges that people have different
preferences, but she doesn't ask her guests' preferences, she just serves
them.

So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?

--
Donna


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,383
Default Picky eater with guests

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
> wrote:

>So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?


I used to live with a very picky eater. When we had company, I cooked
stuff I knew my wife liked. It would never have occurred to me to buy
a separate dessert for the guests.

serene
--
Kissing Hank's Ass is 10 years old! http://jhuger.com/kisshank
My personal blog: http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
My new cooking blog: http://serenecooking.livejournal.com
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Picky eater with guests

Oh pshaw, on Thu 15 Jun 2006 09:03:26p, D.Currie meant to say...

> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of
> thing?


I live with a *very* picky eater who range of preferred foods is very
limited. I frequently will serve him something different than I provide
for guests because he deserves to enjoy his meal, too. The menu for
everyone else is almost always far more interesting and tasty, and I don't
worry that a guest might want something I hadn't intended to serve them.
Having said that, any guest in my home is welcome to whatever I have on
hand.
--
Wayne Boatwright @@
_____________________
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Picky eater with guests

Oh pshaw, on Thu 15 Jun 2006 09:06:29p, Serene meant to say...

> On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
> > wrote:
>
>>So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?

>
> I used to live with a very picky eater. When we had company, I cooked
> stuff I knew my wife liked. It would never have occurred to me to buy
> a separate dessert for the guests.


That's all well and good, but I don't want to bore my guests to tears.:-)
*I* don't even care to eat what my partner likes.

--
Wayne Boatwright @@
_____________________
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,984
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:

> Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either offer
> choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to just
> decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that wasn't
> offered to everyone else.


Yup, that would be the normal, polite thing to do. What she did is
strange and awkward.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Picky eater with guests

I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...

My son is a bit picky eater, yet an easy-to-persuade boy...so, so far,
no problem comes from his being a picky eater, yet!

cheers,
nessia a.k.a groovy mommy
http://groovymommy.insparenting.com

D.Currie wrote:
>
>
> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?
>
> --
> Donna


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Picky eater with guests

Oh pshaw, on Thu 15 Jun 2006 09:52:12p, groovy mommy meant to say...

> I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
> her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...
>
> My son is a bit picky eater, yet an easy-to-persuade boy...so, so far,
> no problem comes from his being a picky eater, yet!
>
> cheers,
> nessia a.k.a groovy mommy
> http://groovymommy.insparenting.com
>


A lot depends on just how picky and how limited the groups of foods that
your picky eater will eat. In my case, I would be embarrassed to serve
guests only the things my partner would eat. It would also be boring as
hell. :-)

I've been preparing two menus for every dinner meal for as long as we've
been together. I refuse to be limited to just what my partner cards to
eat. Life's too short.

--
Wayne Boatwright @@
_____________________
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
28.19...
> Oh pshaw, on Thu 15 Jun 2006 09:06:29p, Serene meant to say...
>
>> On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?

>>
>> I used to live with a very picky eater. When we had company, I cooked
>> stuff I knew my wife liked. It would never have occurred to me to buy
>> a separate dessert for the guests.

>
> That's all well and good, but I don't want to bore my guests to tears.:-)
> *I* don't even care to eat what my partner likes.



Mostly I don't care that he gets something different, and in this case I
declined dessert entirely. But I saw one of the other guests looking
longingly at the pie -- or maybe it was the added scoops of ice cream -- and
I felt sort of bad that she hadn't been given a choice.

Donna


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Goomba38" > wrote in message
...
> D.Currie wrote:
>
>> Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either
>> offer choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to
>> just decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that
>> wasn't offered to everyone else.

>
> Yup, that would be the normal, polite thing to do. What she did is strange
> and awkward.


It seems strange to me, too. Just about as strange as when she served
dessert at another dinner, and everyone got average/large slices, but one
woman was served a small slice. The woman was chubby perhaps, but she didn't
make any mention of being on a diet or wanting a small dessert. When she saw
the size of her pie compared to everyone else's she looked a bit shocked, to
say the least. She didn't say anything, but the look on her face was enough.

Donna


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
28.19...
> Oh pshaw, on Thu 15 Jun 2006 09:52:12p, groovy mommy meant to say...
>
>> I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
>> her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...


I think it was partly because she's tired of the limited choices, so when
she has guests, it's an excuse to make something else.

If it was me, I would have said, "would you like pie, cake, ice cream, or a
combination of two or three of them?" Let the guests decide what they want,
and how much.

Perhaps there was only one slice of pie left from a previous meal, but in
that case, I wouldn't have brought it out in front of guests.


>>
>> My son is a bit picky eater, yet an easy-to-persuade boy...so, so far,
>> no problem comes from his being a picky eater, yet!
>>


Everyone has things they don't like, but how you handle it is the important
part. Picky eaters that are rude and obnoxious about it are annoying, but if
someone can quietly pick out the bad bits or decline something politely,
that's a different matter.

Donna




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,984
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:

> It seems strange to me, too. Just about as strange as when she served
> dessert at another dinner, and everyone got average/large slices, but one
> woman was served a small slice. The woman was chubby perhaps, but she didn't
> make any mention of being on a diet or wanting a small dessert. When she saw
> the size of her pie compared to everyone else's she looked a bit shocked, to
> say the least. She didn't say anything, but the look on her face was enough.


Ohmygod. How incredibly rude and thoughtless that hostess is. I wonder
if she was even conscience of her action and the "unsaid" statement she
made?
Goomba
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Goomba38" > wrote in message
. ..
> D.Currie wrote:
>
>> It seems strange to me, too. Just about as strange as when she served
>> dessert at another dinner, and everyone got average/large slices, but one
>> woman was served a small slice. The woman was chubby perhaps, but she
>> didn't make any mention of being on a diet or wanting a small dessert.
>> When she saw the size of her pie compared to everyone else's she looked a
>> bit shocked, to say the least. She didn't say anything, but the look on
>> her face was enough.

>
> Ohmygod. How incredibly rude and thoughtless that hostess is. I wonder if
> she was even conscience of her action and the "unsaid" statement she made?


I doubt it fazed her one bit. For one thing, I was helping her serve, so I
was the one who delivered the plates, and I saw the look on that woman's
face. I didn't know what to say.

When I saw the serving size, I just figured that they had discussed diets
before, or that they dined together before, and a small dessert had been
requested. After I put the plate down, it was too late. I think I muttered
something about if she wanted more...but the deed had been done.

When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller pieces for
certain people, rather than make them all even. Which is one reason I go
help her serve dessert. Usually I skip it entirely, and if I'm there when
she's slicing, I can stop her from serving any to me.

Donna


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 431
Default Picky eater with guests

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
> wrote:

>I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around, everyone
>was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the husband, who was served
>some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops of different flavors of ice
>cream. The wife, after she sat down, explained that her husband didn't like
>chocolate, but with six people for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying
>a chocolate cake.
>
>This sort of thing has happened before at dinners at this house. With salad,
>veggies, and soup, that I can recall. The husband is very picky.
>
>Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either offer
>choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to just
>decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that wasn't
>offered to everyone else.
>
>But I don't live with a picky eater, so maybe it just seems odd to me
>because I'm not used to it. Maybe if you live with someone like that long
>enough, it's routine for them to get a separate item and you don't think
>about it any more.
>
>But it also seems odd that the wife acknowledges that people have different
>preferences, but she doesn't ask her guests' preferences, she just serves
>them.
>
>So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?


Bad manners, typical of the ignorant.


jim

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,726
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:
> "Goomba38" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> D.Currie wrote:
>>
>>> It seems strange to me, too. Just about as strange as when she
>>> served dessert at another dinner, and everyone got average/large
>>> slices, but one woman was served a small slice. The woman was
>>> chubby perhaps, but she didn't make any mention of being on a diet
>>> or wanting a small dessert. When she saw the size of her pie
>>> compared to everyone else's she looked a bit shocked, to say the
>>> least. She didn't say anything, but the look on her face was enough.

>>
>> Ohmygod. How incredibly rude and thoughtless that hostess is. I
>> wonder if she was even conscience of her action and the "unsaid"
>> statement she made?

>
> I doubt it fazed her one bit. For one thing, I was helping her serve,
> so I was the one who delivered the plates, and I saw the look on that
> woman's face. I didn't know what to say.
>
> When I saw the serving size, I just figured that they had discussed
> diets before, or that they dined together before, and a small dessert
> had been requested. After I put the plate down, it was too late. I
> think I muttered something about if she wanted more...but the deed
> had been done.
>
> When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller
> pieces for certain people, rather than make them all even. Which is
> one reason I go help her serve dessert. Usually I skip it entirely,
> and if I'm there when she's slicing, I can stop her from serving any
> to me.
>
> Donna


I agree this was rather crude of the hostess. If you help her serve
dessert, offer to slice it for her while she does something else like get
the coffee or after-dinner drinks ready. That way you can make sure the
slices are even for everyone involved. If a person is on a diet, there is
no law that says they have to eat the whole serving or, indeed, any dessert
at all.

Jill


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,726
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:
> I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around,
> everyone was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the
> husband, who was served some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops
> of different flavors of ice cream. The wife, after she sat down,
> explained that her husband didn't like chocolate, but with six people
> for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying a chocolate cake.
>

I think she should have offered a choice of chocolate cake, pie with or
without ice cream, or just ice cream to all the guests. Doesn't matter if
her husband is picky, that was just sort of awkward. I'm not overly fond of
chocolate cake, or pie for that matter, but I'd have loved a scoop of ice
cream

Jill




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,734
Default Picky eater with guests


"groovy mommy" > wrote

>I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
> her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...


I can't speak for the wife, but I bet she's just dying to cook for
people other than her picky husband, she is stuck cooking within
his narrow selection. Hey, it's her night, too.

When it comes to dessert, I would have like to have been offered
a choice. I often will try both, small servings. When it's up to me to
provide dessert, I always make sure there is a chocolate and a fruit/
non chocolate selection. More chance everyone will find something
they like.

But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for dessert
then is just that, here's the dessert course.

nancy


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,726
Default Picky eater with guests

Nancy Young wrote:
> "groovy mommy" > wrote
>
>> I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
>> her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...

>
> I can't speak for the wife, but I bet she's just dying to cook for
> people other than her picky husband, she is stuck cooking within
> his narrow selection. Hey, it's her night, too.
>
> When it comes to dessert, I would have like to have been offered
> a choice. I often will try both, small servings. When it's up to me
> to provide dessert, I always make sure there is a chocolate and a
> fruit/
> non chocolate selection. More chance everyone will find something
> they like.
>
> But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
> dessert then is just that, here's the dessert course.
>
> nancy


I wasn't raised having dessert after every meal so I don't really understand
why people feel the need to do that. I guess some folks were raised that
way but to me, dessert is something they offer you at a restaurant. But
then again, I'm not into entertaining, either

Jill


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,734
Default Picky eater with guests


"jmcquown" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:


>> But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
>> dessert then is just that, here's the dessert course.


> I wasn't raised having dessert after every meal so I don't really
> understand
> why people feel the need to do that. I guess some folks were raised that
> way but to me, dessert is something they offer you at a restaurant. But
> then again, I'm not into entertaining, either


Hah, I bet when your mother was serving the other military wives
hot dogs, there was dessert. GarONtee.

nancy


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,984
Default Picky eater with guests

Nancy Young wrote:

> Hah, I bet when your mother was serving the other military wives
> hot dogs, there was dessert. GarONtee.
>
> nancy


Yup, most likely. And keep in mind when serving guests one usually does
do a bit more than the bare minimum or simple family meal. That's what
makes a party a bit more fun, eh?
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,726
Default Picky eater with guests

Nancy Young wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote
>
>> Nancy Young wrote:

>
>>> But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
>>> dessert then is just that, here's the dessert course.

>
>> I wasn't raised having dessert after every meal so I don't really
>> understand
>> why people feel the need to do that. I guess some folks were raised
>> that way but to me, dessert is something they offer you at a
>> restaurant. But then again, I'm not into entertaining, either

>
> Hah, I bet when your mother was serving the other military wives
> hot dogs, there was dessert. GarONtee.
>
> nancy


Now that's totally different! Mom had cocktail parties with aperitifs and
Hors d'Oeuvres and sliced hotdogs in a bourbon mustard sauce served in a
chafing dish. But that's not dessert! I think maybe she had petit fours or
lady fingers. I don't know, I wasn't really allowed to do much more than
make an appearance in a frilly dress to say a polite hello

Jill




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,734
Default Picky eater with guests


"jmcquown" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:
>> "jmcquown" > wrote
>>
>>> Nancy Young wrote:

>>
>>>> But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
>>>> dessert then is just that, here's the dessert course.

>>
>>> I wasn't raised having dessert after every meal so I don't really
>>> understand
>>> why people feel the need to do that. I guess some folks were raised
>>> that way but to me, dessert is something they offer you at a
>>> restaurant. But then again, I'm not into entertaining, either

>>
>> Hah, I bet when your mother was serving the other military wives
>> hot dogs, there was dessert. GarONtee.


> Now that's totally different! Mom had cocktail parties with aperitifs and
> Hors d'Oeuvres and sliced hotdogs in a bourbon mustard sauce served in a
> chafing dish. But that's not dessert! I think maybe she had petit fours
> or
> lady fingers. I don't know, I wasn't really allowed to do much more than
> make an appearance in a frilly dress to say a polite hello


I think maybe she definitely had petit fours or lady fingers. (laugh)

nancy


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Picky eater with guests

In article >,
"D.Currie" > wrote:

> When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller pieces for
> certain people, rather than make them all even.


I do that all the time.
--
-Barb
<http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 6-15-2006; Spanish Chicken and
Rice.
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 308
Default Picky eater with guests

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
> wrote:

>Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either offer
>choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to just
>decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that wasn't
>offered to everyone else.


I agree with you. I don't live with picky eaters, but one of the few
things (and I mean few, I think the list is 5very specific items long)
my older son doesn't like is green salad. Guests or no guests, if I
make that as a side dish, I will make another side dish too (often
tomato salad or chinese cabbage salad), but I'll make enough of it
that others can have some too.

Nathalie in switzerland
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 516
Default Picky eater with guests

On Fri, 16 Jun 2006 09:01:20 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
> wrote:

>In article >,
> "D.Currie" > wrote:
>
>> When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller pieces for
>> certain people, rather than make them all even.

>
>I do that all the time.


At their request?

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35,884
Default Picky eater with guests

"D.Currie" wrote:

>
> But I don't live with a picky eater, so maybe it just seems odd to me
> because I'm not used to it. Maybe if you live with someone like that long
> enough, it's routine for them to get a separate item and you don't think
> about it any more.
>
> But it also seems odd that the wife acknowledges that people have different
> preferences, but she doesn't ask her guests' preferences, she just serves
> them.
>
> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?


I don't live with a picky eater. My wife will eat just about anything with the
exception of beets and lima beans. She has some food allergies that we try to
work around. I doubt that I could come up with a dessert that she wouldn't eat,
but if there was, I really doubt that I would go ahead and make it for guests
and then make something different for her.

My son was always pretty adventurous about foods. I can't think of anything he
refused to eat, though there were things he ate grudgingly. I know that he
always complained about roast lamb, though he didn't mind having lamb so much
when it meant that I made curried lamb with the leftovers.



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 516
Default Picky eater with guests

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 22:03:26 -0600, "D.Currie"
> wrote:

>I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around, everyone
>was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the husband, who was served
>some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops of different flavors of ice
>cream. The wife, after she sat down, explained that her husband didn't like
>chocolate, but with six people for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying
>a chocolate cake.
>
>This sort of thing has happened before at dinners at this house. With salad,
>veggies, and soup, that I can recall. The husband is very picky.
>
>Every time this happens, I think that it's not what I'd do. I'd either offer
>choices to everyone at the table, or I'd expect the picky eater to just
>decline whatever it was, rather than get something "special" that wasn't
>offered to everyone else.
>
>But I don't live with a picky eater, so maybe it just seems odd to me
>because I'm not used to it. Maybe if you live with someone like that long
>enough, it's routine for them to get a separate item and you don't think
>about it any more.
>
>But it also seems odd that the wife acknowledges that people have different
>preferences, but she doesn't ask her guests' preferences, she just serves
>them.


I suspect that she is extremely frustrated on a daily basis by the
husband's limitations and uses the dinner party as an outlet for her
culinary creativity. As long as the husband doesn't get anything
obviously "better" than the guests (eg. steak while the others get
burgers) -which would be mean- I understand why she does it. However,
for dessert it would have been nice to offer everyone a choice of pie
or cake. Not only would it reduce the envy factor of people who'd
rather have pie, but the husband's problem would be downplayed.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,879
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:
> I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around, everyone
> was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the husband, who was served
> some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops of different flavors of ice
> cream. The wife, after she sat down, explained that her husband didn't like
> chocolate, but with six people for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying
> a chocolate cake.
>
> This sort of thing has happened before at dinners at this house. With salad,
> veggies, and soup, that I can recall. The husband is very picky.

----
>
> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?
>




It seems kind of rude (like a wedding where the head table eats lobster
while the guests are served chicken) that she didn't give the other
guests a choice.

I don't have any picky eaters (except maybe my son-in-law but he's not
terrible) but I often offer a choice of two desserts and don't mind in
the least when a guest says "May I have some of each."

As far as the rest of the meal, what you see is what y'all get and feel
free to ignore any item you don't like. Oh, and I'd prefer if you
didn't verbally share your dislikes with the rest of us. That makes me
hostile.

gloria p
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Picky eater with guests



> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?



Divorce, separation, homicide. Picky eaters are like spoiled children.
They just want special attention. It's not like the food would kill them or
that it is hard to eat like some Japanese dishes. I for one will not cook
special meals just to please some twit who never grew up.

Paul


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,780
Default Picky eater with guests

On Fri, 16 Jun 2006 01:21:27 -0400, Goomba38 wrote:

> Ohmygod. How incredibly rude and thoughtless that hostess is.


That was my reaction too.

> I wonder if she was even conscience of her action and the "unsaid" statement she
> made?


I wonder why her guests are willing to put up with that nonsense more
than one time.
--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 279
Default Picky eater with guests

D.Currie wrote:

> When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller
> pieces for certain people, rather than make them all even. Which is
> one reason I go help her serve dessert. Usually I skip it entirely,
> and if I'm there when she's slicing, I can stop her from serving any
> to me.
> Donna


Unless someone specifically asks for a small piece, or the recipient is a
child, this is incredibly rude and ungracious. (As is serving a special
dessert to her husband. She had several much better options: serve everyone
a non-chocolate dessert or offer the options to everyone, just to name two.
If she wanted to offer chocolate and fruit desserts, she could have served
everyone several fruit sorbets with a plate of truffles on the table to
select from.)

This person definitely doesn't have the art of entertaining down AT ALL.
Embarrassing and humiliating your guests is not the point!




  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 279
Default Picky eater with guests

Curly Sue wrote:
> I suspect that she is extremely frustrated on a daily basis by the
> husband's limitations and uses the dinner party as an outlet for her
> culinary creativity.


Since she bought the cake, that excuse would seem to be out! <G>


  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,235
Default Picky eater with guests

jmcquown wrote:

> D.Currie wrote:
> > I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around,
> > everyone was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the
> > husband, who was served some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops
> > of different flavors of ice cream. The wife, after she sat down,
> > explained that her husband didn't like chocolate, but with six
> > people for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying a chocolate
> > cake.
> >

> I think she should have offered a choice of chocolate cake, pie with
> or without ice cream, or just ice cream to all the guests. Doesn't
> matter if her husband is picky, that was just sort of awkward. I'm
> not overly fond of chocolate cake, or pie for that matter, but I'd
> have loved a scoop of ice cream


As that wasn't the planned dessert, there might not have been enough to
offer to guests. The pie and ice cream could have been leftovers from
previous meals.


Brian
--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 707
Default Picky eater with guests

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 23:14:22 -0600, "D.Currie"
> wrote:

>It seems strange to me, too. Just about as strange as when she served
>dessert at another dinner, and everyone got average/large slices, but one
>woman was served a small slice. The woman was chubby perhaps, but she didn't
>make any mention of being on a diet or wanting a small dessert. When she saw
>the size of her pie compared to everyone else's she looked a bit shocked, to
>say the least. She didn't say anything, but the look on her face was enough.


That's just RUDE! You don't discriminate against your dinner guests
when you serve them - either put the food on the table buffet-style
and let them help themselves, ASK them how much/what they would like
before you dish, or give everyone the same... the only valid reason to
discriminate in what you give people is if you know that one person is
allergic to something, or on a restricted diet for medical reasons. In
which case the easiest thing to do is to make enough of both foods for
everyone to have a bit if they want it, or to leave the offending dish
off the person's plate and give them more of what everyone else is
eating instead... eg. if I was cooking for a diabetic, I'd make/buy a
sugar-free dessert to accompany the regular one, and dish theirs
first, but I'd still ask if anyone else would like it instead/as well.

When we had guests for dinner we'd usually have a choice of dessert,
and ask people which one they'd like to have... my father would always
say 'both' (he's greedy!) so he'd just get half as much of each, or
I'd give him one and say he could have the other if he was still
hungry when he finished.
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"jmcquown" > wrote in message
. ..
> D.Currie wrote:
>> I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around,
>> everyone was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the
>> husband, who was served some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops
>> of different flavors of ice cream. The wife, after she sat down,
>> explained that her husband didn't like chocolate, but with six people
>> for dinner, she felt that it was worth buying a chocolate cake.
>>

> I think she should have offered a choice of chocolate cake, pie with or
> without ice cream, or just ice cream to all the guests. Doesn't matter if
> her husband is picky, that was just sort of awkward. I'm not overly fond
> of
> chocolate cake, or pie for that matter, but I'd have loved a scoop of ice
> cream
>
> Jill


She's gotten used to the fact that I usually decline dessert, so the last
time she made it a point to ask me. But with everyone else, she just served
up a portion to each.

I also find that a bit odd, not to ask. I always ask people if they want
any, and if it's something that's portionable, I either let them serve
themselves, or I ask them as I'm cutting slices how large a piece they want.
And there is always the option of seconds.

Donna


  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 707
Default Picky eater with guests

On Fri, 16 Jun 2006 09:01:20 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
> wrote:

>In article >,
> "D.Currie" > wrote:
>
>> When she divvies up desserts, she'll often cut larger or smaller pieces for
>> certain people, rather than make them all even.

>
>I do that all the time.


I do too, but in response to people's REQUEST, or what I know of their
appetites... there's no point in dishing up a gigantic icecream sundae
for a person who never eats more than a quarter of it - that would be
a waste of good food - but it's horribly judgemental to say 'you
shouldn't eat dessert because you're too fat/have too many pimples/I
don't like you, so I'm going to give you a child-sized serve for your
own good'. If I KNOW somebody will eat less/more I'll give them a
serve in proportion... more often I'll just cut ALL the pieces small
and tell people that there's more in the kitchen if they want seconds.


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Janet Puistonen" > wrote in message
news:QzAkg.20$d9.5@trndny04...
> Curly Sue wrote:
>> I suspect that she is extremely frustrated on a daily basis by the
>> husband's limitations and uses the dinner party as an outlet for her
>> culinary creativity.

>
> Since she bought the cake, that excuse would seem to be out! <G>


Maybe it's just to escape the boredom of eating what he eats. She doesn't
enjoy cooking so much that she'd make 2 things when one would do, so maybe
this made sense to her.

Donna


  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Puester" > wrote in message
...
> D.Currie wrote:
>> I was invited to a dinner recently and when dessert came around, everyone
>> was served a slice of chocolate cake, except for the husband, who was
>> served some sort of fruit pie with two small scoops of different flavors
>> of ice cream. The wife, after she sat down, explained that her husband
>> didn't like chocolate, but with six people for dinner, she felt that it
>> was worth buying a chocolate cake.
>>
>> This sort of thing has happened before at dinners at this house. With
>> salad, veggies, and soup, that I can recall. The husband is very picky.

> ----
>>
>> So, if you live with a picky eater, how do you handle this sort of thing?
>>

>
>
>
> It seems kind of rude (like a wedding where the head table eats lobster
> while the guests are served chicken) that she didn't give the other guests
> a choice.
>
> I don't have any picky eaters (except maybe my son-in-law but he's not
> terrible) but I often offer a choice of two desserts and don't mind in
> the least when a guest says "May I have some of each."
>
> As far as the rest of the meal, what you see is what y'all get and feel
> free to ignore any item you don't like.


Yup. When I have people over, and I'm not sure what they like, I tend to
have multiple choices, so everyone has a good chance of finding something to
eat. If there's something they don't like, they don't have to take it, and
if they decide they don't like it after they take a bite, they can leave it
on the plate.


Oh, and I'd prefer if you
> didn't verbally share your dislikes with the rest of us. That makes me
> hostile.


I'd much rather have someone simply say that they don't care for something,
no thanks, than to go into detail about what they don't like, what they
hate, and why and...blah blah blah.

Fine, I won't serve it next time you're here, if I remember, but let's not
have a whole discussion about how it makes you feel or what disgusting
substance it reminds you of. Not at the dinner table.

Donna


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 545
Default Picky eater with guests


"Nancy Young" > wrote in message
...
>
> "groovy mommy" > wrote
>
>>I think what the wife should've done was just prepare the things that
>> her husband likes so the picky issue won't come up at all...

>
> I can't speak for the wife, but I bet she's just dying to cook for
> people other than her picky husband, she is stuck cooking within
> his narrow selection. Hey, it's her night, too.
>
> When it comes to dessert, I would have like to have been offered
> a choice. I often will try both, small servings. When it's up to me to
> provide dessert, I always make sure there is a chocolate and a fruit/
> non chocolate selection. More chance everyone will find something
> they like.


When I have people for dinner, I make sure there are always choices, and
sometimes I think maybe I've gone a little overboard. If there's a green
salad, I'll have a choice of dressings, for example, rather than dressing
the salad for everyone.

Just about everything is served family style, including salad, so people can
choose what and how much they want to eat (and avoid bits they don't like,
if that's what they want to do).

And I'll usually have more choices of sides than when it's just the two of
us, because I want to make sure that everyone gets something they like.
>
> But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
> dessert
> then is just that, here's the dessert course.


We usually don't do fancy parties, it's usually just one couple at a time. I
find it's easier to have a nice conversation that way, and it's easier for
other reasons as well.

Donna


  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,044
Default Picky eater with guests

Donna wrote:

> let's not have a whole discussion about how it makes you feel or what
> disgusting substance it reminds you of. Not at the dinner table.


Especially if you're serving veal and/or foie gras.

Okra's another food that tends to give rise to spirited conversation -- but
that's because the people who dislike okra don't realize how good they have
it: You're NOT serving them natto!

Bob


  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35,884
Default Picky eater with guests

"D.Currie" wrote:

>
>
> When I have people for dinner, I make sure there are always choices, and
> sometimes I think maybe I've gone a little overboard. If there's a green
> salad, I'll have a choice of dressings, for example, rather than dressing
> the salad for everyone.
>
> Just about everything is served family style, including salad, so people can
> choose what and how much they want to eat (and avoid bits they don't like,
> if that's what they want to do).
>
> And I'll usually have more choices of sides than when it's just the two of
> us, because I want to make sure that everyone gets something they like.
> >
> > But then I'm not into 'dinner parties', per se. I guess what's for
> > dessert
> > then is just that, here's the dessert course.

>
> We usually don't do fancy parties, it's usually just one couple at a time. I
> find it's easier to have a nice conversation that way, and it's easier for
> other reasons as well.


That's noble of you. If I had guests that were such picky eaters that they would
not try to enjoy what was offered I would not be inviting them back. There are
restaurants for people like that. There are occasions where we put out a buffet
meal, but for sit down dinner parties I have dinner courses planned. If they
don't like the appetizer they can hope that the entree will be more to their
liking, and if they don't like the entree they can hope for a good dessert. I
like cooking and I like entertaining, but I hate catering to picky eaters.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Were you a picky eater? Andy[_15_] General Cooking 77 18-11-2009 10:53 AM
Fussy Easter or Picky Eater? (long) Melba's Jammin' General Cooking 133 10-05-2009 05:34 PM
picky eater v. ill-mannered hostess TammyM General Cooking 100 18-04-2009 08:27 PM
Vegetable Lasagna for the Picky Eater Karen Bouchard Recipes (moderated) 0 18-12-2007 02:45 AM
I Admit It. I'm A Picky Eater. Terry Pulliam Burd[_1_] General Cooking 59 19-07-2007 04:13 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:17 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"