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Old 19-05-2006, 07:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?

I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank

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Old 19-05-2006, 08:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?

"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank


It might help to know the details of the dish, Frank. Fava beans are shaped
like limas, with a similar consistency inside, but darker flavor.


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Old 19-05-2006, 09:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?

In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank


It might help to know the details of the dish, Frank. Fava beans are shaped
like limas, with a similar consistency inside, but darker flavor.


Right. Bon Appetit magazine, June 2006, Page 124. Tuna & Fava Crostini.
The favas are blanched, skinned, oiled, and 3 or so are placed atop a
tuna mixture spread on toasted baguette slices.

-Frank
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Old 19-05-2006, 09:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?


"Chibiabos" wrote in message
...
In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank


It might help to know the details of the dish, Frank. Fava beans are
shaped
like limas, with a similar consistency inside, but darker flavor.


Right. Bon Appetit magazine, June 2006, Page 124. Tuna & Fava Crostini.
The favas are blanched, skinned, oiled, and 3 or so are placed atop a
tuna mixture spread on toasted baguette slices.

-Frank


I've had that recipe in my file for years - they published it back in the
1990s, too. Tough substitution. Think of a large lima bean. Favas are 2-3
times that size, and medium-brown in color. So much for the visual. I'd say
to hell with color, and go with one of the canned white beans, the bigger,
the better. Maybe simmer them with the canning liquid very briefly with
something to darken the flavor. A little bit of oregano, I think. You might
also find canned fava beans, by the way.


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Old 19-05-2006, 09:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?


"Frank Warner" wrote

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.


Can you find lupini beans?

nancy




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Old 19-05-2006, 09:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?

In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Chibiabos" wrote in message
...
In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank

It might help to know the details of the dish, Frank. Fava beans are
shaped
like limas, with a similar consistency inside, but darker flavor.


Right. Bon Appetit magazine, June 2006, Page 124. Tuna & Fava Crostini.
The favas are blanched, skinned, oiled, and 3 or so are placed atop a
tuna mixture spread on toasted baguette slices.

-Frank


I've had that recipe in my file for years - they published it back in the
1990s, too. Tough substitution. Think of a large lima bean. Favas are 2-3
times that size, and medium-brown in color. So much for the visual. I'd say
to hell with color, and go with one of the canned white beans, the bigger,
the better. Maybe simmer them with the canning liquid very briefly with
something to darken the flavor. A little bit of oregano, I think. You might
also find canned fava beans, by the way.


Thanks much for the input. It gives me a place to start.

Thanks also for avoiding the Hannibal Lecter reference.

-Frank

--
Here's some of my work:
http://www.franksknives.com/
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Old 20-05-2006, 02:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?

Frank wrote:

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.


Edamame are sometimes substituted for fava beans.

Bob


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Old 20-05-2006, 03:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?


Frank Warner wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I can't
find favas in the morning.


If the beans are a garnish you can use any beans or don't use beans at
all... a few hard cooked egg slices would probably substitute just
fine, maybe an improvement. So what is this dish that calls for a fava
bean garnish... I'm guessing it's not a bowl of corn flakes.

Sheldon

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Old 20-05-2006, 06:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?


"Frank Warner" ha scritto nel messaggio
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.


I'd go for lima beans, sometimes called (at least here in Italy) white
spanish beans
Cannellini beans have a very similar taste as well
Guido
__________________________________________
http://www.yummyfood.net
Quick and easy international recipes



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Old 20-05-2006, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Fava bean substitute?


"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Chibiabos" wrote in message
...
In article , JoeSpareBedroom
wrote:

"Frank Warner" wrote in message
. ..
I have a recipe that calls for fava beans, which I have never cooked
or
eaten before, and which I don't remember seeing in local markets.

The beans are acting more like a garnish than an ingredient in this
dish, so, what would be an acceptable substitute? I'm told that fava
beans are members of the pea family. Snow peas? Green beans? Lima or
wax beans? I'm just looking for something more common in case I
can't
find favas in the morning.

-Frank

It might help to know the details of the dish, Frank. Fava beans are
shaped
like limas, with a similar consistency inside, but darker flavor.

Right. Bon Appetit magazine, June 2006, Page 124. Tuna & Fava Crostini.
The favas are blanched, skinned, oiled, and 3 or so are placed atop a
tuna mixture spread on toasted baguette slices.

-Frank


I've had that recipe in my file for years - they published it back in the
1990s, too. Tough substitution. Think of a large lima bean. Favas are 2-3
times that size, and medium-brown in color. So much for the visual. I'd
say
to hell with color, and go with one of the canned white beans, the
bigger,
the better. Maybe simmer them with the canning liquid very briefly with
something to darken the flavor. A little bit of oregano, I think. You
might
also find canned fava beans, by the way.


Thanks much for the input. It gives me a place to start.

Thanks also for avoiding the Hannibal Lecter reference.

-Frank


I didn't even think of that!




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