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Default I am new here,

I am new here, My name is Natalia.

This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
I have a camera and love to take photos.
http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm

Chinese Beef Brisket


1/2 cup rice wine
2/3 cup soy sauce
3 ounces yellow rock sugar; about 2 walnut sized lump
1 (1 1/2 -inch) piece ginger; sliced
3 star anise
1/2 cinnamon stick
1 (2-inch) piece dried
tangerine peel
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 teaspoons fennel seeds
2 teaspoons cornstarch
(optional)
2 green onions, sliced
(optional)
asian red chile sauce
(optional)
1 3 lb. beef brisket

1. Choose a large pot or Dutch oven just wide enough to hold the beef
brisket. Fill it with enough water to submerge the brisket. Bring the
water to a boil. Carefully lower the brisket into the pot. Boil it for
about 3 minutes (this gets rid of the impurities, which rise to the
surface as foam).

2. Using tongs, carefully transfer the brisket to a colander and rinse
it in cool water. Set aside. Discard the cooking water and rinse the
pot.

3. In the pot, combine 6 cups water, the rice wine, soy sauce, rock
sugar, ginger slices, star anise, cinnamon stick and dried tangerine
peel. Bundle up the cumin and fennel seeds in a piece of cheesecloth
and tie it shut with a piece of string. Add to the pot.

4. Cover the pot and bring the mixture to a boil. Lower the heat and
carefully place the brisket in the liquid. If necessary, add more
water to ensure that the brisket is covered. Return to a boil, then
simmer for about 2 hours, until fork-tender.

5. Remove from the heat, uncover and allow to cool. Remove the spices,
then refrigerate the brisket overnight to allow the flavors to meld.
(If serving immediately, proceed to the next step.)

6. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and cut into one-third-inch
slices. If the brisket was cooled or refrigerated, place the pieces in
a large saucepan and ladle in just enough of the braising liquid to
cover.

Warm over medium heat until heated through.

7. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon or tongs, and arrange the
pieces on a serving platter. Pour a little of the liquid over the
beef. If you want a thicker sauce, cover the beef with foil to keep
warm. In a cup, combine the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water. Bring
1 cup of the braising liquid to a boil and add the cornstarch mixture,
cooking and stirring until thickened, about 1 minute. Pour the sauce
over the beef. Garnish with sliced green onions, if desired, and serve
with red chile sauce.

8. Save the remaining braising liquid. Strain into an airtight
container and refrigerate for up to 3 days, or freeze. Discard any
congealed fat on the surface. The next time you make brisket, use this
liquid in place of some of the 6 cups of water. Add more water to
cover the meat and toss in a new batch of rice wine, soy sauce and
spices.

Note: Yellow rock sugar and dried tangerine peel are available at
Asian grocery stores, usually in the spice aisle. The sugar is
crystallized and often labeled "rock candy," and the peel is labeled
"citrus peel." Or you may substitute 2 tablespoons granulated or light
brown sugar for the rock sugar and dry your own tangerine peel. (To do
so, carefully remove the peel from a tangerine, either in a spiral or
in segments, keeping it in one piece if possible. Hang the peel on a
clothesline or a hook for a few days until completely dry, ashy brown
and stiff. Break off what you need and store the rest in a jar or
plastic bag.) Do not use fresh peel for this recipe. Various Asian red
chile sauces are available in the Asian food sections of supermarkets.


Best regards,
Natalia,

north-west of Russia,
Pskov city.


Download ebooks, all in ENGLISH and Free!
Recipes Russian cuisine with photos.
http://recipe.atspace.com/

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Default I am new here,

pskov_recipe wrote:

> I am new here, My name is Natalia.
>
> This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
> thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
> I have a camera and love to take photos.
> http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm
>
> Chinese Beef Brisket
>
>
> 1/2 cup rice wine


If by 'rice wine' you mean the Chinese Shao Xing rice wine might i
suggest you try substituting Japanese Saki. I tend to think the saki is
a better cooking ingredient than the chinese rice wine. Of course if
you like the rice wine disregard the above. Also after your first
blanching of the brisket, try a quick surface browning of the brisket in
sesame oil, then without draining the oil proceed as you indicate in
your recipe.

The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.
---
JL

> 2/3 cup soy sauce
> 3 ounces yellow rock sugar; about 2 walnut sized lump
> 1 (1 1/2 -inch) piece ginger; sliced
> 3 star anise
> 1/2 cinnamon stick
> 1 (2-inch) piece dried
> tangerine peel
> 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
> 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
> 2 teaspoons cornstarch
> (optional)
> 2 green onions, sliced
> (optional)
> asian red chile sauce
> (optional)
> 1 3 lb. beef brisket
>
> 1. Choose a large pot or Dutch oven just wide enough to hold the beef
> brisket. Fill it with enough water to submerge the brisket. Bring the
> water to a boil. Carefully lower the brisket into the pot. Boil it for
> about 3 minutes (this gets rid of the impurities, which rise to the
> surface as foam).
>
> 2. Using tongs, carefully transfer the brisket to a colander and rinse
> it in cool water. Set aside. Discard the cooking water and rinse the
> pot.
>
> 3. In the pot, combine 6 cups water, the rice wine, soy sauce, rock
> sugar, ginger slices, star anise, cinnamon stick and dried tangerine
> peel. Bundle up the cumin and fennel seeds in a piece of cheesecloth
> and tie it shut with a piece of string. Add to the pot.
>
> 4. Cover the pot and bring the mixture to a boil. Lower the heat and
> carefully place the brisket in the liquid. If necessary, add more
> water to ensure that the brisket is covered. Return to a boil, then
> simmer for about 2 hours, until fork-tender.
>
> 5. Remove from the heat, uncover and allow to cool. Remove the spices,
> then refrigerate the brisket overnight to allow the flavors to meld.
> (If serving immediately, proceed to the next step.)
>
> 6. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and cut into one-third-inch
> slices. If the brisket was cooled or refrigerated, place the pieces in
> a large saucepan and ladle in just enough of the braising liquid to
> cover.
>
> Warm over medium heat until heated through.
>
> 7. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon or tongs, and arrange the
> pieces on a serving platter. Pour a little of the liquid over the
> beef. If you want a thicker sauce, cover the beef with foil to keep
> warm. In a cup, combine the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water. Bring
> 1 cup of the braising liquid to a boil and add the cornstarch mixture,
> cooking and stirring until thickened, about 1 minute. Pour the sauce
> over the beef. Garnish with sliced green onions, if desired, and serve
> with red chile sauce.
>
> 8. Save the remaining braising liquid. Strain into an airtight
> container and refrigerate for up to 3 days, or freeze. Discard any
> congealed fat on the surface. The next time you make brisket, use this
> liquid in place of some of the 6 cups of water. Add more water to
> cover the meat and toss in a new batch of rice wine, soy sauce and
> spices.
>
> Note: Yellow rock sugar and dried tangerine peel are available at
> Asian grocery stores, usually in the spice aisle. The sugar is
> crystallized and often labeled "rock candy," and the peel is labeled
> "citrus peel." Or you may substitute 2 tablespoons granulated or light
> brown sugar for the rock sugar and dry your own tangerine peel. (To do
> so, carefully remove the peel from a tangerine, either in a spiral or
> in segments, keeping it in one piece if possible. Hang the peel on a
> clothesline or a hook for a few days until completely dry, ashy brown
> and stiff. Break off what you need and store the rest in a jar or
> plastic bag.) Do not use fresh peel for this recipe. Various Asian red
> chile sauces are available in the Asian food sections of supermarkets.
>
>
> Best regards,
> Natalia,
>
> north-west of Russia,
> Pskov city.
>
>
> Download ebooks, all in ENGLISH and Free!
> Recipes Russian cuisine with photos.
> http://recipe.atspace.com/
>

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Default I am new here,

In article .com>,
"pskov_recipe" > wrote:

> I am new here, My name is Natalia.


Hi and welcome! <waves>

>
> This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
> thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
> I have a camera and love to take photos.


Join alt.binaries.food

> http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm
>
> Chinese Beef Brisket


<snipped yummy recipe>

Keep it up! <lol>
Glad to see someone else that cooks with cinnamon!

Cheers!

>
> Best regards,
> Natalia,

--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Default I am new here,

In article >,
Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:

> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.


Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
thanks!

I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article >,
> Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>
>
>>The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
>>superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
>>dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.

>
>
> Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> thanks!
>
> I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p


It either has to be hot or cold. If you drink it cold it has to be good
quality.


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"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>
>> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
>> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
>> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.

>
> Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> thanks!
>
> I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
> --
> Om.
>


I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan is OK
to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's just
sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
except I usually leave it out.
Dee Dee



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Default I am new here,

In article >,
George > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > In article >,
> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
> >>superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
> >>dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.

> >
> >
> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> > thanks!
> >
> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p

>
> It either has to be hot or cold. If you drink it cold it has to be good
> quality.


Tried it both ways.
Still tastes like cream of wheat. Ick!
Using it for a dip sounds like a good way to use up what I have......
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Default I am new here,

In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
> >
> >> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
> >> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
> >> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.

> >
> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> > thanks!
> >
> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
> > --
> > Om.
> >

>
> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
> using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan is OK
> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
> teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's just
> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
> except I usually leave it out.
> Dee Dee
>
>
>


I think I could probably use the water from rinsing rice....... ;-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > In article >,
>> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>> >
>> >> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is
>> >> IMO
>> >> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
>> >> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.
>> >
>> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
>> > thanks!
>> >
>> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
>> > --
>> > Om.
>> >

>>
>> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
>> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
>> using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan is
>> OK
>> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
>> teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's just
>> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
>> except I usually leave it out.
>> Dee Dee
>>
>>
>>

>
> I think I could probably use the water from rinsing rice....... ;-)
> --
> Om.


Om, I'm not sure whether you're serious or not - but just adding this little
adventure of mine.
I read once that the Koreans used their rinsing water from rice to boil
their Korean turnips in. Since I'm quite fond of these turnips I tried it,
until it dawned on me that the rinsing water contained a LOT of talc, unless
you buy the gormet style or "without talc."

So, "What's the matter with eating talc?"
which reminds me of my m-i-l's answer to this kind of statement; i.e., I
don't eat talc: "What does it do to you, Dee?" -- Tee Hee.
Too bad I couldn't say: "Google is your friend."

DH and I get a lot of laughs over this "Google is your friend" because we
are always 'wondering' and then one of us will say "GIYF" and off we go
rolling on the floor with laughter.
Dee Dee



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In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> >
> >> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > In article >,
> >> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is
> >> >> IMO
> >> >> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
> >> >> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.
> >> >
> >> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> >> > thanks!
> >> >
> >> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
> >> > --
> >> > Om.
> >> >
> >>
> >> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
> >> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
> >> using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan is
> >> OK
> >> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
> >> teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's just
> >> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
> >> except I usually leave it out.
> >> Dee Dee
> >>
> >>
> >>

> >
> > I think I could probably use the water from rinsing rice....... ;-)
> > --
> > Om.

>
> Om, I'm not sure whether you're serious or not - but just adding this little
> adventure of mine.


Dead serious. To me, Sake tastes like watered down cereal.
I guess it's just not for me!

> I read once that the Koreans used their rinsing water from rice to boil
> their Korean turnips in. Since I'm quite fond of these turnips I tried it,
> until it dawned on me that the rinsing water contained a LOT of talc, unless
> you buy the gormet style or "without talc."


Heh! I do rinse rice to get rid of the talc.
Can't see tho' how ingesting it could be harmful?

>
> So, "What's the matter with eating talc?"
> which reminds me of my m-i-l's answer to this kind of statement; i.e., I
> don't eat talc: "What does it do to you, Dee?" -- Tee Hee.
> Too bad I couldn't say: "Google is your friend."
>
> DH and I get a lot of laughs over this "Google is your friend" because we
> are always 'wondering' and then one of us will say "GIYF" and off we go
> rolling on the floor with laughter.
> Dee Dee


I understand! ;-)

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...ingesting+talc

Fascinating topic when googled! <lol>
I can't see how ingesting small amounts could be harmful.
No worse than using Bentonite......


>
>
>

--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson


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Default I am new here,


pskov_recipe wrote:
> I am new here, My name is Natalia.
>
> This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
> thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
> I have a camera and love to take photos.
> http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm


This is the recipe that was published in the L.A. Times (and maybe
Chicago Tribune) in thise week's food section. Also referred to in an
earlier rfc post. Is "Natalia" pretending otherwise? -aem

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"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > In article >,
>> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>> >
>> >> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>> >> ...
>> >> > In article >,
>> >> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is
>> >> >> IMO
>> >> >> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
>> >> >> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.
>> >> >
>> >> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
>> >> > thanks!
>> >> >
>> >> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
>> >> > --
>> >> > Om.
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
>> >> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening
>> >> and
>> >> using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan
>> >> is
>> >> OK
>> >> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
>> >> teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's
>> >> just
>> >> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
>> >> except I usually leave it out.
>> >> Dee Dee
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> > I think I could probably use the water from rinsing rice....... ;-)
>> > --
>> > Om.

>>
>> Om, I'm not sure whether you're serious or not - but just adding this
>> little
>> adventure of mine.

>
> Dead serious. To me, Sake tastes like watered down cereal.
> I guess it's just not for me!
>
>> I read once that the Koreans used their rinsing water from rice to boil
>> their Korean turnips in. Since I'm quite fond of these turnips I tried
>> it,
>> until it dawned on me that the rinsing water contained a LOT of talc,
>> unless
>> you buy the gormet style or "without talc."

>
> Heh! I do rinse rice to get rid of the talc.
> Can't see tho' how ingesting it could be harmful?
>
>>
>> So, "What's the matter with eating talc?"
>> which reminds me of my m-i-l's answer to this kind of statement; i.e., I
>> don't eat talc: "What does it do to you, Dee?" -- Tee Hee.
>> Too bad I couldn't say: "Google is your friend."
>>
>> DH and I get a lot of laughs over this "Google is your friend" because we
>> are always 'wondering' and then one of us will say "GIYF" and off we go
>> rolling on the floor with laughter.
>> Dee Dee

>
> I understand! ;-)
>
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...ingesting+talc
>
> Fascinating topic when googled! <lol>
> I can't see how ingesting small amounts could be harmful.
> No worse than using Bentonite......
>
>> Om.

>

I need go no further. The first hit is
"Avoid ingesting too much. One side effect from over-dosing on talc is a
compacted
colon requiring hospitalization and painful excavation with a spoon to..."

However, it depends on how one looks at it. Talc and ovarian cancer is a
subject (ingestion, or inhaling cosmetics) that I'm not well versed in, but
since talc can be avoided, I choose to do so. I've not worn costmetics for
years (not to avoid talc, tho) and talc is not something I care to ingest.
I see that many pills have/had talc added and I don't know if it is a common
occurrence anymore or not, but I've not seen connotated on the containers.
Even though additives are controversial, talc is one of those that is easily
avoidable -- hopefully!
BTW, turnips cooked in rinse water from talc'd rice tastes no different-ly.

Dee Dee


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In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> >
> >> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > In article >,
> >> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> >> >> ...
> >> >> > In article >,
> >> >> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
> >> >> >
> >> >> >> The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is
> >> >> >> IMO
> >> >> >> superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
> >> >> >> dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
> >> >> > thanks!
> >> >> >
> >> >> > I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
> >> >> > --
> >> >> > Om.
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
> >> >> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening
> >> >> and
> >> >> using and keeping a couple of days. Hot sake as they serve in Japan
> >> >> is
> >> >> OK
> >> >> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
> >> >> teeny-tiny drinks. Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's
> >> >> just
> >> >> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
> >> >> except I usually leave it out.
> >> >> Dee Dee
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> > I think I could probably use the water from rinsing rice....... ;-)
> >> > --
> >> > Om.
> >>
> >> Om, I'm not sure whether you're serious or not - but just adding this
> >> little
> >> adventure of mine.

> >
> > Dead serious. To me, Sake tastes like watered down cereal.
> > I guess it's just not for me!
> >
> >> I read once that the Koreans used their rinsing water from rice to boil
> >> their Korean turnips in. Since I'm quite fond of these turnips I tried
> >> it,
> >> until it dawned on me that the rinsing water contained a LOT of talc,
> >> unless
> >> you buy the gormet style or "without talc."

> >
> > Heh! I do rinse rice to get rid of the talc.
> > Can't see tho' how ingesting it could be harmful?
> >
> >>
> >> So, "What's the matter with eating talc?"
> >> which reminds me of my m-i-l's answer to this kind of statement; i.e., I
> >> don't eat talc: "What does it do to you, Dee?" -- Tee Hee.
> >> Too bad I couldn't say: "Google is your friend."
> >>
> >> DH and I get a lot of laughs over this "Google is your friend" because we
> >> are always 'wondering' and then one of us will say "GIYF" and off we go
> >> rolling on the floor with laughter.
> >> Dee Dee

> >
> > I understand! ;-)
> >
> > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...ingesting+talc
> >
> > Fascinating topic when googled! <lol>
> > I can't see how ingesting small amounts could be harmful.
> > No worse than using Bentonite......
> >
> >> Om.

> >

> I need go no further. The first hit is
> "Avoid ingesting too much. One side effect from over-dosing on talc is a
> compacted
> colon requiring hospitalization and painful excavation with a spoon to..."
>
> However, it depends on how one looks at it. Talc and ovarian cancer is a
> subject (ingestion, or inhaling cosmetics) that I'm not well versed in, but
> since talc can be avoided, I choose to do so. I've not worn costmetics for
> years (not to avoid talc, tho) and talc is not something I care to ingest.
> I see that many pills have/had talc added and I don't know if it is a common
> occurrence anymore or not, but I've not seen connotated on the containers.
> Even though additives are controversial, talc is one of those that is easily
> avoidable -- hopefully!
> BTW, turnips cooked in rinse water from talc'd rice tastes no different-ly.
>
> Dee Dee
>
>


I don't actually use rice water for cooking....... ;-)
I'd rather not eat talc either.

My point was that, to me anyway, saki tastes like cereal water.
Soak some oatmeal or cream of wheat maybe, and drain off the liquid for
the same flavor.

Sarcasm aside, I really just do not care for saki! <G>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

>
> I understand! ;-)
>
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...ingesting+talc
>
> Fascinating topic when googled! <lol>
> I can't see how ingesting small amounts could be harmful.
> No worse than using Bentonite......


<nudge nudge> Don't forget to trim up those posts you respond to, ok?
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Dee Randall wrote:

> However, it depends on how one looks at it. Talc and ovarian cancer is a
> subject (ingestion, or inhaling cosmetics) that I'm not well versed in, but
> since talc can be avoided, I choose to do so. I've not worn costmetics for
> years (not to avoid talc, tho) and talc is not something I care to ingest.
> I see that many pills have/had talc added and I don't know if it is a common
> occurrence anymore or not, but I've not seen connotated on the containers.
> Even though additives are controversial, talc is one of those that is easily
> avoidable -- hopefully!


My understanding is not injesting talc (in fact we sometimes inject it
in pleural spaces to cause deliberate scar tissue formation) but rather
a concern about women who powder their bottoms and cootchies to excess.
There is some speculation about increased cancer from that.
Goomba


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In article >,
Goomba38 > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> >
> > I understand! ;-)
> >
> > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...ingesting+talc
> >
> > Fascinating topic when googled! <lol>
> > I can't see how ingesting small amounts could be harmful.
> > No worse than using Bentonite......

>
> <nudge nudge> Don't forget to trim up those posts you respond to, ok?


Yes mom. <lol>

Note I've been a little better lately, but not always....
Depends on how awake I am. I actually need to go to sleep shortly here
as I have to work tonight!

hugs!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Goomba38 wrote:
<snip>

> their bottoms and cootchies to excess.

^^^^^^^^^^^^

Ok, I have now seen everything in rfc including the word "cootchie".

-L.

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Dee Randall wrote:
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>In article >,
>>Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>The combination in equal parts of sesame oil, sake and soy sauce is IMO
>>>superb. I use it in equal parts as a marinade, dipping sauce and
>>>dressing for pasta, meat, fish, veggies & etc.

>>
>>Now I know what to do with the sake dad bought me for my birthday,
>>thanks!
>>
>>I detest sake as a drink. Tastes like cereal water or something. ;-p
>>--
>>Om.
>>

>
>
> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
> using and keeping a couple of days.


I don't like to drink sake, but when mixed with sesame oil and soy sauce
in equal parts its marvellous for cooking.

One can then go on to add onion, ginger, garlic, daikon & etc. with
shrimp, beef, pork, chicken, veggies, rice & etc. it is wonderful, IMO.

I have never had a problem with keeping it, though i often by a small
half bottle and use it all for the mix with soy sauce and sesame oil and
keep it in the fridge.

The japanese buy it by the gallon or larger and keep it at room temp.
for weeks and months without any deleterious effect, at least to the saki

I have been told, and i don't know if it is true or not, but i have
been told that it is possible to get cheap, bad saki in Japan but that
the demand for it is so small (relatively) in the states and Europe that
only the good stuff is imported.

Hot sake as they serve in Japan is OK
> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
> teeny-tiny drinks.


Sulphides? Some american wines effect me the same way, a tiny sip is
enough to give me a head ache. Oddly this does not happen when i cook
with the same wine, perhaps the cooking alters or eliminates the sulphates?

Mirin is a problem at our house as DH says it's just
> sweetened sake. I never know what to do with recipes that use sake --
> except I usually leave it out.
> Dee Dee
>


That is what i understand, mirin is sugar added sake, i could be wrong
but i think there is a difference between saki and sake and iirc one,
saki, is considered a quality product and sake is the japanese
equivalent of vin ordinaire or a less than quality product.
---
JL
>
>

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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>
> I don't actually use rice water for cooking....... ;-)
> I'd rather not eat talc either.
>
> My point was that, to me anyway, saki tastes like cereal water.
> Soak some oatmeal or cream of wheat maybe, and drain off the liquid for
> the same flavor.
>
> Sarcasm aside, I really just do not care for saki! <G>


I feel much the same way about olive oil.
---
JL
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In article .com>,
"-L." > wrote:

> Goomba38 wrote:
> <snip>
>
> > their bottoms and cootchies to excess.

> ^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> Ok, I have now seen everything in rfc including the word "cootchie".
>
> -L.
>


<lol> Well, it's one of the more _polite_ terms!
We see this a lot in elderly females at work. It's a PITA as
the talc ends up in the cup when we do a urinalysis on them.
Interferes with the microscopic analysis... <sigh>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson


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In article >,
"Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" > wrote:

> Goomba38 > looking for trouble wrote in
> :
>
> > Dee Randall wrote:
> >
> >> However, it depends on how one looks at it. Talc and ovarian cancer
> >> is a subject (ingestion, or inhaling cosmetics) that I'm not well
> >> versed in, but since talc can be avoided, I choose to do so. I've not
> >> worn costmetics for years (not to avoid talc, tho) and talc is not
> >> something I care to ingest. I see that many pills have/had talc added
> >> and I don't know if it is a common occurrence anymore or not, but
> >> I've not seen connotated on the containers. Even though additives are
> >> controversial, talc is one of those that is easily avoidable --
> >> hopefully!

> >
> > My understanding is not injesting talc (in fact we sometimes inject it
> > in pleural spaces to cause deliberate scar tissue formation) but
> > rather a concern about women who powder their bottoms and cootchies to
> > excess. There is some speculation about increased cancer from that.
> > Goomba

>
> <post left intact for brevity>
>
> I don't know nothin' 'bout ovarian cancer. Nothin'. I hope whoever has it
> gets thru it.
>
> Michael <- popping in on a thread he would best stay out of


Hey, many guys powder "the boys downstairs" too! (or so I've read.....
<lol>)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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In article >,
Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>

<snipped>
> > Sarcasm aside, I really just do not care for saki! <G>

>
> I feel much the same way about olive oil.
> ---
> JL


Ack! Sacralige!!!!!! ;-D

What kind of oil do you use?
I've been using more Grapeseed oil lately.
It's more neutral in flavor and takes a lot more heat.

I also found that it polymerized faster for re-seasoning cast iron!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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>> I find that buying a bottle of sake as an ingredient for a dish is a
>> expensive crying-shame. The sake is absolutely awful after opening and
>> using and keeping a couple of days.

>
> I have never had a problem with keeping it, though i often by a small half
> bottle and use it all for the mix with soy sauce and sesame oil and keep
> it in the fridge.


I don't buy the small bottles of anything alcohol, based on experience that
the small bottles of wine with 'metal caps' is usually not wine that I care
to drink. (I don't cook with wine that I don't drink, is the caveat.)
>
> The japanese buy it by the gallon or larger and keep it at room temp. for
> weeks and months without any deleterious effect, at least to the saki


Hmm - I've not heard this. Very interesting. I suppose it is for cooking,
not drinking?

>
> I have been told, and i don't know if it is true or not, but i have been
> told that it is possible to get cheap, bad saki in Japan but that the
> demand for it is so small (relatively) in the states and Europe that only
> the good stuff is imported.


I'm not sure what 'good stuff' is, but I've seen it cheaply and expensively
priced (for my pocketbook).


>
> Hot sake as they serve in Japan is OK
>> to drink, but what a headache I have from it next day from just a few
>> teeny-tiny drinks.

>
> Sulphides? Some american wines effect me the same way, a tiny sip is
> enough to give me a head ache. Oddly this does not happen when i cook
> with the same wine, perhaps the cooking alters or eliminates the
> sulphates?



Yes, I'm allergic to sulphites in wine, and it can be either white or red,
and my reaction is bright red cheeks and dizziness. It also goes
hand-in-hand with not liking the particular wine that I have this reaction
to. I keep a wine list of wines purchased, and I never buy that wine again.

PS, I like a white wine I recently bought at Trader Joe's that is
inexpensive (I drink mainly red) *******o Bianco $5.49. I'm thinking perhaps
a white wine such as this might be a good substitute for the saki -- I'm not
sure of the difference in alcohol content - I'd have to look that up.

Thanks for your response,
Dee Dee



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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> In article >,
> Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
>
>
>>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>>

>
> <snipped>
>
>>>Sarcasm aside, I really just do not care for saki! <G>

>>
>>I feel much the same way about olive oil.
>>---
>>JL

>
>
> Ack! Sacralige!!!!!! ;-D


Yes, i know, very heretical of me, but there you go, i have never found
an olive oil i like the taste of. Though i have had foods where it is
an ingredient that were excellent, i not only don't like the taste but
do not know how to use it.

>
> What kind of oil do you use?


For general purposes i use canola oil and believe it imparts a peasant
flavour to foods.

> I've been using more Grapeseed oil lately.


I keep grape seed oil around for the sauteing of beef, IMO it makes an
incredible difference with beef. I like walnut oil for a vinaigrette
and will use avocado oil alone with a bit of lemon or lime juice to
dress a salad.
---
JL

> It's more neutral in flavor and takes a lot more heat.
>
> I also found that it polymerized faster for re-seasoning cast iron!

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In article .com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> pskov_recipe wrote:
> > I am new here, My name is Natalia.
> >
> > This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
> > thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
> > I have a camera and love to take photos.
> > http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm

>
> This is the recipe that was published in the L.A. Times (and maybe
> Chicago Tribune) in thise week's food section. Also referred to in an
> earlier rfc post. Is "Natalia" pretending otherwise? -aem


"Interesting" website that has links to all kinds of stuff including
software for "unlimited autoresponding", whatever that is . She
posted a recipe for lemon curd to r.f.preserving a few days ago.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-27-2006, The Best Dead Spread Yet


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>> I don't know nothin' 'bout ovarian cancer. Nothin'. I hope whoever has
>> it
>> gets thru it.
>>
>> Michael <- popping in on a thread he would best stay out of

>
> Hey, many guys powder "the boys downstairs" too! (or so I've read.....
> <lol>)
> --
> Om.


Oh, yuk, did you have to go and bring that UP. :-)
Dee Dee


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"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>>> I don't know nothin' 'bout ovarian cancer. Nothin'. I hope whoever has
>>> it
>>> gets thru it.
>>>
>>> Michael <- popping in on a thread he would best stay out of

>>
>> Hey, many guys powder "the boys downstairs" too! (or so I've read.....
>> <lol>)
>> --
>> Om.

>
> Oh, yuk, did you have to go and bring that UP. :-)


I'm thinking, that poor person who is new here, have they run
screaming into the night yet? I can only wonder how this
thread got to this point.

nancy


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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
> "Interesting" website that has links to all kinds of stuff including
> software for "unlimited autoresponding", whatever that is . She
> posted a recipe for lemon curd to r.f.preserving a few days ago.


"unlimited autoresponding" sounds like a link I would be afraid to
click on. I don't want my machine doing things I don't know about....


But the website has pictures and recipes, including some Russian stuff
that might be interesting. I forgot to look for it, but there's
probably your favorite beet soup there. ;-) -aem

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In article .com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> >
> > "Interesting" website that has links to all kinds of stuff including
> > software for "unlimited autoresponding", whatever that is . She
> > posted a recipe for lemon curd to r.f.preserving a few days ago.

>
> "unlimited autoresponding" sounds like a link I would be afraid to
> click on. I don't want my machine doing things I don't know about....
>
>
> But the website has pictures and recipes, including some Russian stuff
> that might be interesting. I forgot to look for it, but there's
> probably your favorite beet soup there. ;-) -aem


I know; the whole thing is odd. Oh, well. I won't be going back.
--
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In article >,
Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> >>

> >
> > <snipped>
> >
> >>>Sarcasm aside, I really just do not care for saki! <G>
> >>
> >>I feel much the same way about olive oil.
> >>---
> >>JL

> >
> >
> > Ack! Sacralige!!!!!! ;-D

>
> Yes, i know, very heretical of me, but there you go, i have never found
> an olive oil i like the taste of. Though i have had foods where it is
> an ingredient that were excellent, i not only don't like the taste but
> do not know how to use it.


I disliked the way it smelled and tasted also when I was a teenager but
for some reason, I really like it now.

>
> >
> > What kind of oil do you use?

>
> For general purposes i use canola oil and believe it imparts a peasant
> flavour to foods.


It is mild.

>
> > I've been using more Grapeseed oil lately.

>
> I keep grape seed oil around for the sauteing of beef, IMO it makes an
> incredible difference with beef. I like walnut oil for a vinaigrette
> and will use avocado oil alone with a bit of lemon or lime juice to
> dress a salad.
> ---
> JL


I've not tried avocado oil but have heard good things about it.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson


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In article >,
"Nancy Young" > wrote:

> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>> I don't know nothin' 'bout ovarian cancer. Nothin'. I hope whoever has
> >>> it
> >>> gets thru it.
> >>>
> >>> Michael <- popping in on a thread he would best stay out of
> >>
> >> Hey, many guys powder "the boys downstairs" too! (or so I've read.....
> >> <lol>)
> >> --
> >> Om.

> >
> > Oh, yuk, did you have to go and bring that UP. :-)

>
> I'm thinking, that poor person who is new here, have they run
> screaming into the night yet? I can only wonder how this
> thread got to this point.
>
> nancy
>
>


Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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In article >,
"Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet > looking for trouble wrote in
> :

<snipped>
> > Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D

>
> I love "Thread drift" and I'm serious
>
> Michael


Mee too! ;-D
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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>> OmManiPadmeOmelet > looking for trouble wrote in
>> :

> <snipped>
>> > Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D

>>
>> I love "Thread drift" and I'm serious
>> Michael

>
> Mee too! ;-D
> Om.


Mee too, and I'm serious, too,
(Also contributing to this particular thread drift) I'm expecting at some
point there will be someone that will have a snit-fit that the original
poster actually meant such-and-such and why can't one read the intent of the
poster's query in the way it was formed, and why can't you understand it?
BTAIM, doesn't most dialog drift? Don't people usually interrupt and
interject their own reactions -- yes, just as I'm doing now.
Dee Dee



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In article >,
Steve Wertz > wrote:

> On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 17:28:58 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
> > wrote:
>
> >"Interesting" website that has links to all kinds of stuff including
> >software for "unlimited autoresponding", whatever that is .

>
> Think "Spam Software".
>
> -sw


I did - that's kinda what I thought it was. :-/
--
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Dee Randall wrote:

> >> OmManiPadmeOmelet > looking for trouble wrote in
> >> :

> > <snipped>
> >> > Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D
> >>
> >> I love "Thread drift" and I'm serious
> >> Michael

> >
> > Mee too! ;-D
> > Om.

>
> Mee too, and I'm serious, too,
> (Also contributing to this particular thread drift) I'm expecting at some
> point there will be someone that will have a snit-fit that the original
> poster actually meant such-and-such and why can't one read the intent of the
> poster's query in the way it was formed, and why can't you understand it?
> BTAIM, doesn't most dialog drift? Don't people usually interrupt and
> interject their own reactions -- yes, just as I'm doing now.
> Dee Dee


And why hasn't anyone interrupted with a religious rant. And a pointer to his
noodly appendage?
http://www.venganza.org/
Edrena






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"aem" > wrote in news:1138738762.503901.299800
@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

>
> pskov_recipe wrote:
>> I am new here, My name is Natalia.
>>
>> This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
>> thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
>> I have a camera and love to take photos.
>> http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm

>
> This is the recipe that was published in the L.A. Times (and maybe
> Chicago Tribune) in thise week's food section. Also referred to in an
> earlier rfc post. Is "Natalia" pretending otherwise? -aem
>


I don't think so. Note that she says "thank you for the recipe". I think
she's indicating that she is going to make a recipe she found here (Terry
posted the recipe in full).

--
Rhonda Anderson
Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
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"Michael "Dog3" Lonergan" > wrote

> OmManiPadmeOmelet > looking for trouble wrote


>> "Nancy Young" > wrote:


>>> I'm thinking, that poor person who is new here, have they run
>>> screaming into the night yet? I can only wonder how this
>>> thread got to this point.


>> Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D

>
> I love "Thread drift" and I'm serious


Hope you know I wasn't complaining, just confused and amused.

nancy


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Dee Randall wrote:

>>>OmManiPadmeOmelet > looking for trouble wrote in
:

>>
>><snipped>
>>
>>>>Thread drift... Gotta love it! ;-D
>>>
>>>I love "Thread drift" and I'm serious
>>>Michael

>>
>>Mee too! ;-D
>>Om.

>
>
> Mee too, and I'm serious, too,
> (Also contributing to this particular thread drift) I'm expecting at some
> point there will be someone that will have a snit-fit that the original
> poster actually meant such-and-such and why can't one read the intent of the
> poster's query in the way it was formed, and why can't you understand it?
> BTAIM, doesn't most dialog drift? Don't people usually interrupt and
> interject their own reactions -- yes, just as I'm doing now.
> Dee Dee
>
>
>

I had a thread drift on the hem of a skirt once. It wouldn't have been
so bad if it hadn't caught on the restaurant chair. I ended up making a
quick repair in the washroom. That is one good reason to always carry a
small sewing kit in your purse
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> Hey, many guys powder "the boys downstairs" too! (or so I've read.....
> <lol>)



Well my boys are FULLY grown but in the summer they like a nice dose of
talcum powder too...

My boys may be a bit "forward" at times but they are *always* squeeky
clean...

;--p

--
Best
Greg


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Melba's Jammin' wrote:

> In article .com>,
> "aem" > wrote:
>
> > pskov_recipe wrote:
> > > I am new here, My name is Natalia.
> > >
> > > This weekend I am going to make Chinese Beef Brisket,
> > > thank you for the recipe. I love to cook.
> > > I have a camera and love to take photos.
> > > http://recipe.atspace.com/second.htm

> >
> > This is the recipe that was published in the L.A. Times (and maybe
> > Chicago Tribune) in thise week's food section. Also referred to in an
> > earlier rfc post. Is "Natalia" pretending otherwise? -aem

>
> "Interesting" website that has links to all kinds of stuff including
> software for "unlimited autoresponding", whatever that is . She
> posted a recipe for lemon curd to r.f.preserving a few days ago.



"Natalia" I'd bet is some kind of spammer/troll...no doubt next she'll be
offering "home stay accomodation" and "guide services" in Kiev (or Pskov or
wherever) by "young English - speaking lady"...

Wasn't the lemon curd thang from a whiles back? For some reason that seems
to ring a bell...

--
Best
Greg


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