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Default leftover oatmeal

I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.
Thanks in advance.

Tara
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Tara wrote:
> I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
> bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
> it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Tara


Try making an oatmeal pie. I made one many years ago, turned out quite
good.

Google Oatmeal Pie--there's a ton of recipes out there that look quite
good (some with coconut, or chocolate).--r3

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Default leftover oatmeal

Tara wrote:
> I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
> bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
> it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.



Cooked oatmeal can be an ingredient in yeast bread. (I can look in
_Laurel's Kitchen_ for you if you want details.)


Cooked oatmeal makes a nice thickener for cream soups. Add it to the
chunks of vegetables as they boil and soften. Puree. I like to strain
the soup through a strainer for added elegance, but that's not strictly
necessary. Add cream, milk or soymilk at the end. Then season.


--Lia

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Default leftover oatmeal

Tara wrote:
> I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
> bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
> it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.


Well I've tried, but I cannot imagine how one ends up with two cups of
cooked oatmeal with no plans for it. Was breakfast interrupted? Then
why not just reheat for tomorrow's breakfast. Some things are what
they are, what else do you want oatmeal to be? -aem

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Default leftover oatmeal

Tara wrote:

> I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
> bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
> it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.
> Thanks in advance.


I often add leftover oatmeal to pancake batter. I adjust things to get the
same consistency as a regular pancake batter. Oatmeal makes great
pancakes.




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Default leftover oatmeal

On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 20:18:07 -0500, Julia Altshuler
> wrote:

>Tara wrote:
>> I have about two cups of cooked oatmeal mixed with applesauce and a
>> bit of sugar. Is there anything I could make with this? I'm thinking
>> it could be added to pancake or waffle batter. Any ideas are welcome.

>
>
>Cooked oatmeal can be an ingredient in yeast bread. (I can look in
>_Laurel's Kitchen_ for you if you want details.)


There's the best story about the oatmeal in that book. I'm gonna go
grab it and type it in, because it's one of my favorites:

She pulled down a couple of gallon jars, shook them over the bowl, and
plunged in again with both arms. Soon the batter was dough. It
seemed to come alive in her hands. In fact, I found out later, it
_was_ a sort of living entity for her: Laurel thinks of herself as
merely an accessory to the whole process, whose part is is to call to
life the one-celled microorganisms who do all the work. She nurses a
warm affection for the tiny creatures -- the "yeast basties," as she
calls them -- and never feels completely right about the use we put
them to. I know the conflict still rankles, because just the other
morning as I was about to add a small pan of leftover oatmeal to the
dough we were mixing (it keeps the bread moist and does nice thigs to
the texture), I saw her brow contract sharply.

"Come on, Laurel, out with it. I won't be hurt."

"It's just, well, the oatmeal looks pretty hot still. I mean, for the
yeasties. Do you think you could cool it off first?"

A protest was on my lips -- after all, we were going to _bake_ the
blessed yeasties in another hour, at three hundred and seventy-five
degrees -- until I saw the look of mute suffering on her face, and
without another word, I spread the oatmeal onto a cookie sheet to
cool.

serene
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Default leftover oatmeal


serene wrote:
>
> There's the best story about the oatmeal in that book. I'm gonna go
> grab it and type it in, because it's one of my favorites:
>
> She pulled down a couple of gallon jars, shook them over the bowl, and
> plunged in again with both arms. Soon the batter was dough. It
> seemed to come alive in her hands. In fact, I found out later, it
> _was_ a sort of living entity for her: Laurel thinks of herself as
> merely an accessory to the whole process, whose part is is to call to
> life the one-celled microorganisms who do all the work. She nurses a
> warm affection for the tiny creatures -- the "yeast basties," as she
> calls them -- and never feels completely right about the use we put
> them to. I know the conflict still rankles, because just the other
> morning as I was about to add a small pan of leftover oatmeal to the
> dough we were mixing (it keeps the bread moist and does nice thigs to
> the texture), I saw her brow contract sharply.
>
> "Come on, Laurel, out with it. I won't be hurt."
>
> "It's just, well, the oatmeal looks pretty hot still. I mean, for the
> yeasties. Do you think you could cool it off first?"
>
> A protest was on my lips -- after all, we were going to _bake_ the
> blessed yeasties in another hour, at three hundred and seventy-five
> degrees -- until I saw the look of mute suffering on her face, and
> without another word, I spread the oatmeal onto a cookie sheet to
> cool.
>
> serene


LOL...very cute! Laurel sounds a lot like me...
-L.

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Default leftover oatmeal

In article . com>,
"aem" > wrote:

> Well I've tried, but I cannot imagine how one ends up with two cups of
> cooked oatmeal with no plans for it. Was breakfast interrupted? Then
> why not just reheat for tomorrow's breakfast. Some things are what
> they are, what else do you want oatmeal to be? -aem


I cook breakfast for the six of us. Rich and I pretty much know how
much we eat, but the boys go through growth spurts when they eat and eat
and eat, so we make extra for them. Usually, it all gets eaten up,
sometimes it doestn't. Then, it goes into bread. Although the ideas
for pancake batter and for oatmeal pie sound interesting to me.

Regards,
Ranee

Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

"She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
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Default leftover oatmeal

On 29 Jan 2006 18:22:40 -0800, "aem" > wrote:

>Well I've tried, but I cannot imagine how one ends up with two cups of
>cooked oatmeal with no plans for it. Was breakfast interrupted? Then
>why not just reheat for tomorrow's breakfast. Some things are what
>they are, what else do you want oatmeal to be? -aem


Max and Whit (my 13 month old twins) love oatmeal and applesauce. I
haven't made it in a month or so. I made a large batch, planning on
serving it to them for two or three breakfasts. After Sunday
breakfast, I decided no more oatmeal until they are more adept with a
spoon. You can't spoon feed them anymore; they want to feed
themselves, but they don't know what to do with the spoon just yet.
Each would drop his spoon into his bowl, pick it out, lick it off, and
repeat. Finally, Whit picked up the bowl and drank the rest of his
oatmeal. We all went straight into the bath.

I'll eat a bowl of oatmeal if it's my only choice, but I don't love
it. I do love oatmeal cookies, so I hope I can end up with some
pancakes with a similar taste. Max and Whit can eat those, too.

Tara
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Default leftover oatmeal

I decided to try making pancakes with my leftover oatmeal, mixing it
with a cup of Bisquick, a cup of milk, a pinch of pumpkin pie spice,
and two eggs. I topped the pancakes with blueberries. They were
pretty good.

Tara
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