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salgud
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

A few weeks ago, there was a lengthy thread about pizza stones and
whether they made a difference in the pizza. Someone claimed they were
a waste of money.
Last Saturday, America's Test Kitchen did a pizza show. They tested
doing pizza's with and without the stone. No comparison. The crust done
without the stone was limp, floppy and an ugly light brown. The ones
done on the stone were crisp and a nice medium brown, like from a pizza
place.
Of course, some people might discount the show, but unless they cooked
35 pizzas and did a direct comparison, as AHK did, I don't think they
can refute it except as an opinion. The proof is in the kitchen!

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Kent
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.

"salgud" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>A few weeks ago, there was a lengthy thread about pizza stones and
> whether they made a difference in the pizza. Someone claimed they were
> a waste of money.
> Last Saturday, America's Test Kitchen did a pizza show. They tested
> doing pizza's with and without the stone. No comparison. The crust done
> without the stone was limp, floppy and an ugly light brown. The ones
> done on the stone were crisp and a nice medium brown, like from a pizza
> place.
> Of course, some people might discount the show, but unless they cooked
> 35 pizzas and did a direct comparison, as AHK did, I don't think they
> can refute it except as an opinion. The proof is in the kitchen!
>



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Peter Aitken
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

"Kent" > wrote in message
...
>I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required


An essential thing that many people omit is to preheat the stone properly.
It takes a long time, 45 minutes or so. When the oven signals it has reached
temperature the stone still has a long way to go.


--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


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salgud
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


Kent wrote:
> I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
> for a good pizza.


Obviously, you didn't follow the previous thread on this topic.


The question is how do you best use the stone.

Put in on a low rack in the oven.

>
> "salgud" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >A few weeks ago, there was a lengthy thread about pizza stones and
> > whether they made a difference in the pizza. Someone claimed they were
> > a waste of money.
> > Last Saturday, America's Test Kitchen did a pizza show. They tested
> > doing pizza's with and without the stone. No comparison. The crust done
> > without the stone was limp, floppy and an ugly light brown. The ones
> > done on the stone were crisp and a nice medium brown, like from a pizza
> > place.
> > Of course, some people might discount the show, but unless they cooked
> > 35 pizzas and did a direct comparison, as AHK did, I don't think they
> > can refute it except as an opinion. The proof is in the kitchen!
> >


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salgud
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


Peter Aitken wrote:
> "Kent" > wrote in message
> ...
> >I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required

>
> An essential thing that many people omit is to preheat the stone properly.
> It takes a long time, 45 minutes or so. When the oven signals it has reached
> temperature the stone still has a long way to go.


Yes, they mentioned it had to be preheated for a while. Time depending
on the individual oven.

>
>
> --
> Peter Aitken
> Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm




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salgud
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


Bob Myers wrote:
> "Kent" > wrote in message
> ...
> > I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
> > for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.

>
> You leave it in the oven, preheat the oven to a good hot temp (475-500
> will be a "good hot temp" for most home ovens) for a good long time,
> and use a peel to deposit the pizza directly onto the stone.
>
> This, children, is the One True Path to Pizza Nirvana...beware of the
> infidels who would lead you astray with perforated metal pans and
> other abominations, for such is the work of the devil!
>
>
> Bob M.


If I remember right, they put the pizza on parchment paper on the stone
on AHK.

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Bob Myers
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


"Kent" > wrote in message
...
> I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
> for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.


You leave it in the oven, preheat the oven to a good hot temp (475-500
will be a "good hot temp" for most home ovens) for a good long time,
and use a peel to deposit the pizza directly onto the stone.

This, children, is the One True Path to Pizza Nirvana...beware of the
infidels who would lead you astray with perforated metal pans and
other abominations, for such is the work of the devil!


Bob M.



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Bob Myers
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


"salgud" > wrote in message
ups.com...

> If I remember right, they put the pizza on parchment paper on the stone
> on AHK.


You certainly can do this without offending the Pizza Gods - it
may help slide the peel under the pizza, I guess, or help keep the
stone a bit cleaner, but I've never seen any reason to try it. I
just make sure the pizza crust has a dusting of flour on the
bottom (last thing I do after rolling it out is to dust one side and
flip it over onto the peel, then start piling on the ingreadients),
and having a little flour/corn meal on the peel before loading on
the crust. No problems. The pizza doesn't stick to the stone
at all, and about the only difficulty (since my stone is a bit on the
small side, given the size I generally make the pizzas) is plopping
the thing down in the middle of the stone, so that nothing droops
over the edges and spills onto the rack below.

Bob M.


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Blair P. Houghton
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited


Kent wrote:
> I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
> for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.


You place it in a coal-fired brick oven and apply dough made in the
traditional Neapolitan way, covered with whatever the hell you want.

Of course, the stone is superfluous in this recipe...

--Blair

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Christine Dabney
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

On 20 Jan 2006 19:01:01 -0800, "Blair P. Houghton"
> wrote:

>
>Kent wrote:
>> I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
>> for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.

>
>You place it in a coal-fired brick oven and apply dough made in the
>traditional Neapolitan way, covered with whatever the hell you want.
>
>Of course, the stone is superfluous in this recipe...
>
>--Blair


Just like at Pizzeria Bianco... Man,that was some good pizza.

I have tried to emulate it, but come only marginally close, even with
a pizza stone and instructions from Peter Reinhardt and his book,
American Pie.

Got to get some more of that pizza, when I come through that way in a
few months...

Christine


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Blair P. Houghton
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

Christine Dabney wrote:
> On 20 Jan 2006 19:01:01 -0800, "Blair P. Houghton"
> > wrote:
> >Kent wrote:
> >> I don't think there is any doubt that the stone is better; it is required
> >> for a good pizza. The question is how do you best use the stone.

> >
> >You place it in a coal-fired brick oven and apply dough made in the
> >traditional Neapolitan way, covered with whatever the hell you want.
> >
> >Of course, the stone is superfluous in this recipe...

>
> Just like at Pizzeria Bianco... Man,that was some good pizza.
>
> I have tried to emulate it, but come only marginally close, even with
> a pizza stone and instructions from Peter Reinhardt and his book,
> American Pie.
>
> Got to get some more of that pizza, when I come through that way in a
> few months...


Ah, but Bianco's is wood-fired, while Grimaldi's (in Scottsdale and
Ocotillo)
is coal-fired. I'm not sure about Grazie's, but it doesn't match
either
Grimaldi's or Bianco's, so it's neither here nor there.

--Blair
"We have our own Penzey's now, too."

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Bill
 
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Default Pizza stones revisited

On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 21:30:48 GMT, "Bob Myers"
> wrote:

>
>"salgud" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>> If I remember right, they put the pizza on parchment paper on the stone
>> on AHK.

>
>You certainly can do this without offending the Pizza Gods - it
>may help slide the peel under the pizza, I guess, or help keep the
>stone a bit cleaner, but I've never seen any reason to try it. I
>just make sure the pizza crust has a dusting of flour on the
>bottom (last thing I do after rolling it out is to dust one side and
>flip it over onto the peel, then start piling on the ingreadients),
>and having a little flour/corn meal on the peel before loading on
>the crust. No problems. The pizza doesn't stick to the stone
>at all, and about the only difficulty (since my stone is a bit on the
>small side, given the size I generally make the pizzas) is plopping
>the thing down in the middle of the stone, so that nothing droops
>over the edges and spills onto the rack below.
>
>Bob M.
>

I had good results dusting the pizza stone with cornmeal before
placing the pizza on it to cook...

Bill


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