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Goomba38
 
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Default Parcook crudites?

I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much raw. I
wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still bright
green, dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this common and I've
somehow missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want to try it. How do
you think they might have done it?
Goomba
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Thu 19 Jan 2006 06:23:08a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Goomba38?

> I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
> broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much raw. I
> wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still bright
> green, dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this common and I've
> somehow missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want to try it. How do
> you think they might have done it?
> Goomba
>


Quickly blanch it by plunging the broccoli into water at a rolling boil for
1-2 minutes tops, then plunge iimmediately iinto cold or ice water. Works
well for cauliflower, too.

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!

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Julia Altshuler
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> Quickly blanch it by plunging the broccoli into water at a rolling boil for
> 1-2 minutes tops, then plunge immediately into cold or ice water. Works
> well for cauliflower, too.



Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to a
rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly 5
minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2 minutes
if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw. When
the timer goes off, I drain and put ice water on top as Wayne says. I
don't normally use salt when cooking, but I'd guess the restaurant where
you ate used salt water. When the broccoli is completely cold, drain,
and let it air dry a tad before serving. (The drying probably happened
as the broccoli was at the salad bar before you got there.)


--Lia

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Goomba38
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> Quickly blanch it by plunging the broccoli into water at a rolling boil for
> 1-2 minutes tops, then plunge iimmediately iinto cold or ice water. Works
> well for cauliflower, too.
>


And all this time I have been serving raw broccoli...raw! Who knew?
Thanks Wayne
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Goomba38
 
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Julia Altshuler wrote:

> Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to a
> rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
> have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly 5
> minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2 minutes
> if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.


finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
be in order next?
Goomba


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Julia Altshuler
 
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Goomba38 wrote:

> finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
> lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
> be in order next?



To make sure it is finger-food type raw to your liking, try leaving it
in the hot, just under boiling water, for only 1 minute. I'd say the
blanching serves to bring out the color and somehow make the salt adhere
better. (I'm not sure of that.) Dipping sauces will be the subject of
the next thread. I love dipping sauces for vegetables.


--Lia

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Goomba38
 
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Julia Altshuler wrote:

> To make sure it is finger-food type raw to your liking, try leaving it
> in the hot, just under boiling water, for only 1 minute. I'd say the
> blanching serves to bring out the color and somehow make the salt adhere
> better. (I'm not sure of that.) Dipping sauces will be the subject of
> the next thread. I love dipping sauces for vegetables.


Yes... anyone have a nice gingery sesame type dip?
I had some baked potstickers at work the other night (someone brought
them from home) and they had a lovely dipping sauce made simply from 1/2
cup red jalepeno jelly, 1/4 cup rice vinegar and 2 tablespoons reduced
sodium soy sauce all heated up together to melt. It was very good! I
think that would be good with broccoli too.
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Goomba38 > wrote:

> I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
> broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much raw. I
> wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still bright
> green, dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this common and I've
> somehow missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want to try it. How do
> you think they might have done it?
> Goomba


It was probably slightly wilted. ;-)

I DO par-cook carrots as I've fouund that more get eaten that way.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Goomba38 > wrote:

> Julia Altshuler wrote:
>
> > Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to a
> > rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
> > have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly 5
> > minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2 minutes
> > if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.

>
> finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
> lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
> be in order next?
> Goomba


Ranch dressing!!!!!!!!! :-d
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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kilikini
 
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"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Goomba38 > wrote:
>
> > Julia Altshuler wrote:
> >
> > > Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to

a
> > > rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
> > > have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly

5
> > > minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2

minutes
> > > if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.

> >
> > finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
> > lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
> > be in order next?
> > Goomba

>
> Ranch dressing!!!!!!!!! :-d
> --


What other dipping sauce for veggies is there? :~) Oh, maybe a honey,
garlic, ginger, chili concoction.........

kili




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King's Crown
 
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I blanch pretty much all my veggies when I make a veggie tray. They all
look so good and they are tastier to me.

Lynne

"Goomba38" > wrote in message
. ..
>I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
>broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much raw. I
>wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still bright green,
>dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this common and I've somehow
>missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want to try it. How do you think
>they might have done it?
> Goomba



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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Thu 19 Jan 2006 09:07:58a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Goomba38?

> Julia Altshuler wrote:
>
>> To make sure it is finger-food type raw to your liking, try leaving it
>> in the hot, just under boiling water, for only 1 minute. I'd say the
>> blanching serves to bring out the color and somehow make the salt adhere
>> better. (I'm not sure of that.) Dipping sauces will be the subject of
>> the next thread. I love dipping sauces for vegetables.

>
> Yes... anyone have a nice gingery sesame type dip?
> I had some baked potstickers at work the other night (someone brought
> them from home) and they had a lovely dipping sauce made simply from 1/2
> cup red jalepeno jelly, 1/4 cup rice vinegar and 2 tablespoons reduced
> sodium soy sauce all heated up together to melt. It was very good! I
> think that would be good with broccoli too.
>


One I've tried and liked...

1 large head fresh garlic
1 1/2 cups extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon tamari sauce or soy sauce
2 teaspoons shredded/grated fresh ginger
1/4 teaspoon dark sesame oil

Prepare the garlic head for roasting by cutting it in half horizontally
(through the plumpest portion of the cloves), keeping each half intact.
Place the halves, cut side down, in a baking dish coated with 1/4 cup of
the olive oil. Roast in a 400 degree oven until tender and golden, about 30
minutes. Remove dish from oven and let garlic cool.

To make the sauce: Squeeze the garlic cloves out of the skins and place
them back in the baking dish. Smash the cloves into small bits (leaving
some in chunks is perfectly OK). Scrape the mixture into a bowl and stir in
the vinegar, tamari, ginger and sesame oil. Add the remaining 2 1/4 cups
olive oil. May be prepared several days or weeks ahead and refrigerated.

Bring the sauce to room temperature before serving.

--
Wayne Boatwright տլ
________________________________________

Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!

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~patches~
 
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kilikini wrote:
> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>In article >,
>> Goomba38 > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Julia Altshuler wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to

>
> a
>
>>>>rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
>>>>have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly

>
> 5
>
>>>>minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2

>
> minutes
>
>>>>if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.
>>>
>>>finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
>>>lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
>>>be in order next?
>>>Goomba

>>
>>Ranch dressing!!!!!!!!! :-d
>>--

>
>
> What other dipping sauce for veggies is there? :~) Oh, maybe a honey,
> garlic, ginger, chili concoction.........
>
> kili
>
>

Other ideas - sundried tomatoe dip, spinach dip, creamy garlic dip,
onion dip, hot crab dip, avocado dip, best vegetable dip, dilly dip,
blue cheese dip. I can come up with a lot of good dips for dipping
veggies in.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
~patches~ > wrote:

> kilikini wrote:
> > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >
> >>In article >,
> >> Goomba38 > wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Julia Altshuler wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to

> >
> > a
> >
> >>>>rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
> >>>>have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly

> >
> > 5
> >
> >>>>minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2

> >
> > minutes
> >
> >>>>if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.
> >>>
> >>>finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today. I have some
> >>>lovely broccoli in need of eating. Perhaps some nice dipping sauces will
> >>>be in order next?
> >>>Goomba
> >>
> >>Ranch dressing!!!!!!!!! :-d
> >>--

> >
> >
> > What other dipping sauce for veggies is there? :~) Oh, maybe a honey,
> > garlic, ginger, chili concoction.........
> >
> > kili
> >
> >

> Other ideas - sundried tomatoe dip, spinach dip, creamy garlic dip,
> onion dip, hot crab dip, avocado dip, best vegetable dip, dilly dip,
> blue cheese dip. I can come up with a lot of good dips for dipping
> veggies in.


Hot cheese dip works a treat too.

Herbed sour cream maybe as well, or good ol' guacamole.

Honestly tho', ranch is still my favorite.

Ceaser or Italian dressing mixed with sour cream to thicken might work.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Gregory Morrow
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> Ceaser or Italian dressing mixed with sour cream to thicken might work.
>



And if y'all include celery sticks on yer crudite platter DON'T forget to
PEEL the celery...nothin' worse than a celery string hangin' out yer
mouth...

--
Best
Greg




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Chris
 
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"~patches~" > wrote in message
...
>>

> Other ideas - sundried tomatoe dip, spinach dip, creamy garlic dip, onion
> dip, hot crab dip, avocado dip, best vegetable dip, dilly dip, blue cheese
> dip. I can come up with a lot of good dips for dipping veggies in.


Cheese fondue!!


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Joseph Littleshoes
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> ~patches~ wrote:
>
>>kilikini wrote:
>>
>>>"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote:
>>>
>>>>Goomba38 wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Julia Altshuler wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to a
>>>
>>>
>>>>>>rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
>>>>>>have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly 5
>>>
>>>
>>>>>>minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2 minutes
>>>
>>>
>>>>>>if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.
>>>>>
>>>>>finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today.


Am i not getting this? A platter of raw sliced veggies with various
dipping sauces is almost de rigur around here, just about any home i go
to that is serving any kind of refreshment will almost certainly provide
a platter of raw sliced veggies.

I do live in a major, urban 'foodie' area, and tend to know mostly
people who take a serious interest in eating well. And fully half the
people in my social circle are vegetarians of one sort or another.

Some of the more seriously politically correct have stopped using toilet
paper, and even if they don't own a bidet, they keep a plastic squeeze
bottle of water and a special cloth to wipe themselves with. I really
don't want to know how they store this 'cloth' between uses or how they
wash it, though some of them claim to use their hand in the middle
eastern manner.

When this became public knowledge people started not being so put off by
my considering the 'shaking of hands' to be a meaningless social ritual
i choose not to indulge in.
---
JL
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~patches~
 
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Chris wrote:

> "~patches~" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Other ideas - sundried tomatoe dip, spinach dip, creamy garlic dip, onion
>>dip, hot crab dip, avocado dip, best vegetable dip, dilly dip, blue cheese
>>dip. I can come up with a lot of good dips for dipping veggies in.

>
>
> Cheese fondue!!
>
>

Oh yes! Since I'm planning a fondue for the superbowl party perhaps I
could work in veggies to dip. The suggested dippers for the recipe I
have could easily include broccoli and even pineapple both of which are
good on pizza
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Luciano
 
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I'm surprised...no one mentioned seasoning your water. I never blanch in
plain water if I can help it. Flavour your water...add some other veggies,
maybe some chicken bouillion, worchestershire...etc....make it
flavourful...thats probably how the restaurant did it.


"Goomba38" > wrote in message
. ..
>I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
>broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much raw. I
>wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still bright green,
>dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this common and I've somehow
>missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want to try it. How do you think
>they might have done it?
> Goomba



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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article . net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > Ceaser or Italian dressing mixed with sour cream to thicken might work.
> >

>
>
> And if y'all include celery sticks on yer crudite platter DON'T forget to
> PEEL the celery...nothin' worse than a celery string hangin' out yer
> mouth...


If the celery is allowed to wilt EVER so slightly, it strings better.
Then you can crisp it back up by placing the bases in a glass of water
in the 'frige.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson


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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article <MsQzf.17353$Zo.10294@trnddc07>,
"Chris" > wrote:

> "~patches~" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>

> > Other ideas - sundried tomatoe dip, spinach dip, creamy garlic dip, onion
> > dip, hot crab dip, avocado dip, best vegetable dip, dilly dip, blue cheese
> > dip. I can come up with a lot of good dips for dipping veggies in.

>
> Cheese fondue!!
>
>


YES!!!!!!!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Joseph Littleshoes > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > ~patches~ wrote:
> >
> >>kilikini wrote:
> >>
> >>>"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>Goomba38 wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>Julia Altshuler wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>>Here's the way I do it that's even easier for me: Bring the water to a
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>>>rolling boil. Put the broccoli in, cover and turn off the heat. (I
> >>>>>>have electric so I move the pot to a cold burner.) Then time exactly 5
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>>>minutes if I want to consider the broccoli cooked and exactly 2 minutes
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>>>if I want to consider the broccoli blanched but essentially raw.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>finger food type raw still? I am going to try this today.

>
> Am i not getting this? A platter of raw sliced veggies with various
> dipping sauces is almost de rigur around here, just about any home i go
> to that is serving any kind of refreshment will almost certainly provide
> a platter of raw sliced veggies.
>
> I do live in a major, urban 'foodie' area, and tend to know mostly
> people who take a serious interest in eating well. And fully half the
> people in my social circle are vegetarians of one sort or another.
>
> Some of the more seriously politically correct have stopped using toilet
> paper, and even if they don't own a bidet, they keep a plastic squeeze
> bottle of water and a special cloth to wipe themselves with. I really
> don't want to know how they store this 'cloth' between uses or how they
> wash it, though some of them claim to use their hand in the middle
> eastern manner.
>
> When this became public knowledge people started not being so put off by
> my considering the 'shaking of hands' to be a meaningless social ritual
> i choose not to indulge in.
> ---
> JL


You mis-attributed that. :-)

Raw veggie dip trays are a regular whenever I entertain.
The only exception is carrots.

I've found (thru experience) that really very few people like raw
carrots.

They lie and just say they do, then eat everything else and leave those
lay...

If I steam them slightly (I use the faux baby carrots a lot for this) so
they are slightly softened, people eat them up.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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aem
 
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King's Crown wrote:
> I blanch pretty much all my veggies when I make a veggie tray. They all
> look so good and they are tastier to me.
>

Yes, it is a matter of taste. Even a brief parboil produces something
different from raw taste. I almost never parboil things for crudits
because I like them raw. To each his own. -aem

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Gregory Morrow
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> In article . net>,
> "Gregory Morrow"
> <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
>
> > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> >
> > > Ceaser or Italian dressing mixed with sour cream to thicken might

work.
> > >

> >
> >
> > And if y'all include celery sticks on yer crudite platter DON'T forget

to
> > PEEL the celery...nothin' worse than a celery string hangin' out yer
> > mouth...

>
> If the celery is allowed to wilt EVER so slightly, it strings better.
> Then you can crisp it back up by placing the bases in a glass of water
> in the 'frige.



Hmmm...and here all along I thought that cold was always supposed to put the
kibbosh on "erections" ;---p

--
Best
Greg


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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote on 19 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

> On Thu 19 Jan 2006 06:23:08a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
> Goomba38?
>
> > I had broccoli off a salad bar at a restaurant the other day and the
> > broccoli was wonderful! Seasoned slightly, yet still pretty much
> > raw. I wondered if they blanched it or something first? It was still
> > bright green, dry and crunchy, yet not totally "raw". Is this
> > common and I've somehow missed it? Makes for a great nosh and I want
> > to try it. How do you think they might have done it?
> > Goomba
> >

>
> Quickly blanch it by plunging the broccoli into water at a rolling
> boil for 1-2 minutes tops, then plunge iimmediately iinto cold or ice
> water. Works well for cauliflower, too.
>


I use a hot frying pan...chuck in the brocolli and 5 or 6 oz chicken
bullion flavoured water put on the lid 4 or 5 minutes to tender crisp.

Nice clour, flavour and texture.

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.


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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article . net>,
"Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > In article . net>,
> > "Gregory Morrow"
> > <gregorymorrowEMERGENCYCANCELLATIONARCHIMEDES@eart hlink.net> wrote:
> >
> > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > >
> > > > Ceaser or Italian dressing mixed with sour cream to thicken might

> work.
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > And if y'all include celery sticks on yer crudite platter DON'T forget

> to
> > > PEEL the celery...nothin' worse than a celery string hangin' out yer
> > > mouth...

> >
> > If the celery is allowed to wilt EVER so slightly, it strings better.
> > Then you can crisp it back up by placing the bases in a glass of water
> > in the 'frige.

>
>
> Hmmm...and here all along I thought that cold was always supposed to put the
> kibbosh on "erections" ;---p


All men are equal in cold water... ;-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Rhonda Anderson
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet > wrote in
:

> I've found (thru experience) that really very few people like raw
> carrots.
>
> They lie and just say they do, then eat everything else and leave
> those lay...
>
> If I steam them slightly (I use the faux baby carrots a lot for this)
> so they are slightly softened, people eat them up.


Really? Carrots would be one of my preferred raw vegetables. I know quite a
few people who enjoy eating raw carrot. Grated raw carrot is a standard in
salad sandwiches at sandwich shops, and is often found in salads.

I can't imagine eating cold, slightly steamed carrot in preference to
crispy, crunchy, sweet, raw carrots.

Rhonda Anderson
Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
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Posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default Parcook crudites?


Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> OmManiPadmeOmelet > wrote in
> :
>
> > I've found (thru experience) that really very few people like raw
> > carrots.
> >
> > They lie and just say they do, then eat everything else and leave
> > those lay...
> >
> > If I steam them slightly (I use the faux baby carrots a lot for this)
> > so they are slightly softened, people eat them up.

>
> Really? Carrots would be one of my preferred raw vegetables. I know quite a
> few people who enjoy eating raw carrot. Grated raw carrot is a standard in
> salad sandwiches at sandwich shops, and is often found in salads.
>
> I can't imagine eating cold, slightly steamed carrot in preference to
> crispy, crunchy, sweet, raw carrots.
>

It's a matter of taste, of course, but count me in agreement with you.
-aem

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Posted to rec.food.cooking
Joseph Littleshoes
 
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Default Parcook crudites?

aem wrote:
> Rhonda Anderson wrote:
>
>>OmManiPadmeOmelet > wrote in
:
>>
>>
>>>I've found (thru experience) that really very few people like raw
>>>carrots.
>>>
>>>They lie and just say they do, then eat everything else and leave
>>>those lay...
>>>
>>>If I steam them slightly (I use the faux baby carrots a lot for this)
>>>so they are slightly softened, people eat them up.

>>
>>Really? Carrots would be one of my preferred raw vegetables. I know quite a
>>few people who enjoy eating raw carrot. Grated raw carrot is a standard in
>>salad sandwiches at sandwich shops, and is often found in salads.
>>
>>I can't imagine eating cold, slightly steamed carrot in preference to
>>crispy, crunchy, sweet, raw carrots.
>>

>
> It's a matter of taste, of course, but count me in agreement with you.
> -aem
>


While i agree also, fresh is best, i do occasionally pour boiling hot
vinegar flavoured with mustard over a bunch of chopped up, bite sized
veggies, which are then very lightly blanched, but more importantly,
flavoured by the hot vinegar.

Kind of like the bean salads but made with veggies and whole cloves of
garlic.

Green beans i will lightly blanch first, artichoke bottoms, and i think
there are 2 or 3 other veggies that also require a preliminary blanching
and which i would not serve raw but i cant think of what they are.
---
JL
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Julia Altshuler
 
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Default Parcook crudites?

My experience with crudite trays has been that people like to see a tray
with lots of variety including broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery,
and radishes. Then the carrots are the only section that everyone eats
with celery coming in second. My observations are limited to all those
vegetables being entirely raw. I haven't experimented with blanched
vegetables on the crudite tray yet.


--Lia



  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Default Parcook crudites?

Julia Altshuler wrote on 21 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

> My experience with crudite trays has been that people like to see a tray
> with lots of variety including broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery,
> and radishes. Then the carrots are the only section that everyone eats
> with celery coming in second. My observations are limited to all those
> vegetables being entirely raw. I haven't experimented with blanched
> vegetables on the crudite tray yet.
>
>
> --Lia
>
>


I believe; that like pickles, some people like crunchy, and others don't.

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
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